#1
does anyone know if it would be at all possible to build a pedal that when stomped on can bring up your signal over a period of time and can also be set to fade out your signal over a period of time?
#2
volume pedal
Gear
Agile Septor 7
Fender MIM Strat
Epiphone G-400
Ovation Celebrity 12 string
Peavey Classic 50
#5
Quote by cokeisbetter
Yeah. You can also do that with your guitar's volume knob.



ummm... while your playing? not everbody is a hindu god
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

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#7
OK, maybe i didnt make myself clear, i know that you can use a volume pedal or the volume knob or whatever, but i just thought it dbe a great little gadget to have, seeing as i dont have a volume pedalk or a lot of money, i vouldve built a simple stomp box to do the trick for a lot less.
#8
You can do a type of tremolo circuit in which you make the speed slow, and when it reaches the part of the tremolo where the sound goes away, just stop playing so that when it starts to come back up, theres no sound. If I had experience with tremolos, I would give it a shot, but I dont know yet. I will let you know when I get some info on how to do this.
#9
A volume pedal changes the amplitude of the signal by varying resistance in a voltage divider. What you need to do is, instead of a pot, use something where the resistance changes according to another input. Mosfets have changing resistance determined by the voltage at the gate. To make it ramp up or down, you connect the gate to an r/c network, which can produce a log/ reverse log changing voltage over time. Add a latching push switch across half of the network and, hey presto. The time variable can be changed with another pot, but this will apply to both turn on and turn off times. Having them separate is a bit more difficult since you have to take into account voltage drops across channelling diodes which means, if set incorrectly, the volume will never change.
I could build you one, if you can't do it yourself.
#10
Quote by Wyld Stallyn
A volume pedal changes the amplitude of the signal by varying resistance in a voltage divider. What you need to do is, instead of a pot, use something where the resistance changes according to another input. Mosfets have changing resistance determined by the voltage at the gate. To make it ramp up or down, you connect the gate to an r/c network, which can produce a log/ reverse log changing voltage over time. Add a latching push switch across half of the network and, hey presto. The time variable can be changed with another pot, but this will apply to both turn on and turn off times. Having them separate is a bit more difficult since you have to take into account voltage drops across channelling diodes which means, if set incorrectly, the volume will never change.
I could build you one, if you can't do it yourself.


Maybe a schematic will help tell your description .
#12
Maybe a schematic will help tell your description.

Maybe a wad of cash will refresh my memory
yea or maby if you posted a schematic we could steal your idea and sell it to other people......

You guys drive a hard bargain!



Here's an early schematic of the idea. I've looked around my garage and couldn't find any finished ones so I can't remember exact values (some of them have to be quite precise to stop oscillating). Its only got one fade channel for both in and out, but you can add more for:
separate fade in/out times
different fade times, like a shot one for a few seconds + longer ones for the intro to damage inc. / the outro solo for fade to black.
hardly noticeable fade time for muting, but because its resistive you don't get pops when you unmute


Give it a try if you want to, and give me royalties when you do. I have tuition fees to pay!

Dave
#13
I'm really interested in a stomp box like this - was thinking aobut this for a while but didn't know how to attempt it, maybe there are some hi-fi electronic projects that can help us out.
Marty
#14
cheers Wyld, that looks great, let me know when you find the values for everything so i can then build one. You live like half hour away from me aswell, i live in brentwood in Essex!
#15
Quote by thesumoftwo
OK, maybe i didnt make myself clear, i know that you can use a volume pedal or the volume knob or whatever, but i just thought it dbe a great little gadget to have, seeing as i dont have a volume pedalk or a lot of money, i vouldve built a simple stomp box to do the trick for a lot less.


Volume pedals are really cheap, only about 30 quid, and you can fairly easily mod an old wah into a volume pedal. Using an auto fade thing like you're suggesting would be too much like an auto-wah, ie; sh*t.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#16
You live like half hour away from me aswell, i live in brentwood in Essex!

Cool, I worked there for a bit last year at Ford's main offices. I'll test out some values to make it work - I feel like making one now!
#17
thanks dude, i didnt even know that this was possible

EDIT:where do you get your parts from? (i struggle to find places that stock everything that i need)
#18
Try rapid electronics - one of the biggest in England and I can see the warehouse from my window! Stuff's pretty cheap there, because theres a new legislation ("ROHS") where companies can't buy products that contain certain chemicals, since they can't be recycled. Rapid are selling all "non-ROHS" stock off v.cheap, some stuff's less than 1p (I bought 50 jack sockets for 25p). Normal Joes can buy the stuff cheap because you don't need to recycle the stuff you make.
Postage is cheap too, and if your order is over about £30 it's free.
I've got an idea for a much simpler fade pedal that isn't so critical with component values, I'll post it if I've got time/if it works. I just like the complex design because I like having control over absolutely every little bit of my tone (my new rackmount wahwah pedal will have 11 knobs!)
#20

Here's a simpler one - the signal path is completely passive, which most people with tube amps seem to prefer. The little box with the LED in is supposed to be an LED and LDR facing each other surrounded by a roll of black tape, like Fender used to use. Any LED will work really. For the LDR I used one that went from 400r to 1M - that gave almost full volume to no volume. There is a tiny loss in volume like this, but it's impossible to hear, only measure. When it's "off" you just about hear a signal getting through if you turn your amp up to full and don't have any other effects inbetween them. The only way to get round that is to use solid state components but they suffer from distortion when the amplitude is too high. Having effects pedals after this will probably get rid of this.
This will work regardless of what the input amplitude is, whether it's straigh after your guitar or at line out level.
Changing the resistor at the far left to a pot will let you alter the fade time. 1M equates to roughly 1 second, but because the system isn't completely linear the fade times can be slightly different.
Don't worry about the help, I'm just trying to give help where I know what I'm talking about. I'll be needing help later on when I start making tube power amps.
#21
thats awesome, a couple of other things, what is that thing top left? and how would i wire a switch onto this? (im still a realtive n00b at this, i only know the very basics)
#22
At the very top left is a footswitch. You can use a normal dpdt one that everyone uses for true bypass. You just use one half of it, and the other half could be wired to LEDs to show whether the volume is on or off. When the footswitch is pressed on, the LED slowly turns on. The LDRs resistance lowers and the volume turns down, just like using the volume knob on your guitar.
It shouldn't suck tone, but if you want to be safe you can wire a true bypass switch just as you would normally, between the input and output jacks.
#25
Hey, I've never heard of that place! The second one is so simple it should be pretty obvious so probably exists elsewhere, but the first one is more complex and I'd be really surprised if it was on the web before.
#26
I have that effect on my Line 6 Floorboard....

It doesn't work the best all the time, the smoothness of the auto-volume attack can be pretty shoddy if you make the volume turn up quickly, it's best if it's done slowly.

Also, it often has issues with knowing when to go to 0 volume.

I don't use it anymore, it's like trying to cope with Auto-Wah. If you want something done right you've got to do it yourself. Volume pedal all the way!
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