#1
hi, i think this is the right forum.
Anyway i own a Crafter TCL80 Electro-acoustic, and i barely play it, i play my fender strat 99% of the time. The thing with this guitar is that it's REALLY hard to play, the strings are so tough, which makes it hard for me to play solos and to fret every string when i play barre chords. My fingertips hurt after 15 minutes of playing. I'm not 100% sure how to fix this. i think it's because the strings are really high off the fret board, so i have to push down harder. i know it's not the strings because i bought 09's for it and it was still tough.

How can i solve this problem? would filing down the bone bit on the bridge where the strings rest help?

thanks in advance, and please say if something else is the problem.
Last edited by ezequiel89 at Sep 8, 2006,
#2
1-Play it more

2- Use sandpaper on the saddle (bottom side) if you must but high action will help you in the long run.

Your fingers are probibly not used to having to push the strings.
#3
^thanks. that's exactly what i was thinking of doing but i wanted to make sure first. i've had it for 9 months and played it 3-4 hours everyday for 6 months and i always thought it was a difficult guitar to play. Until i got my strat i didn't realize that it was a REALLY difficult guitar, my fingers never fully got used to it but it helped because on every other guitar i've played, they were really easy for me because my finger tips were like rocks, unlike my other friends. Now i just want to make it easier to play so then i play it more, and feel comfortable.
#5
1, PLAY IT MORE
2, TRY SOFTER STRINGS
3, like the other dude said, sandpaper it if ABSOLUTLY needed..
4, press the string REALLY hard when you playy and after a while it'll soften everything up...but it'll screww up your hand (that'll get better later) so dont be a pansy about hurting your hand "pain is just weakness leaving your body" and i think thats about all i cant tell you...

peace out
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#6
Sanding can potentially cause fret buzz if you lower the action too much.

Trust me man, the best solution to this problem is just to play it more.
You just don't have the callus or the finger strength yet - but it'll come.
#8
you dont use it anyway so, go a lighter gauge.
8's elixer coated string.

it will release the neck tension, lower the action, make it easier to press and wont hurt ur fingers as much.
Jenneh

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#9
Acoustic is a sado-masochistic instrument. Your fingers should hurt until you have callouses built up. You shouldn't have to stand on the strings though. That's when you kow something is wrong.
Correct me if I'm wrong; mind over matter works for me. If I don't mind; it don't matter.
#11
I'd say lower the action first, and if that doesnt solve it stop being a wimp. You're going to need to build up your calluses which will prevent most of the pain from playing to long.

If the neck isn't straight, adjust the truss rod. Adjust the action SLOWLY, taking a little bit off the bottom of the saddle at a time until it's comfortable to play. Your nut *may* also need to be reslotted, but I don't have any measurements to go by so I cant tell you for sure.

jcwear - adjusting the 'thing under the headstock' commonly known as the truss rod, is not for adjusting the action. Adjusting the truss rod is only to straighten a bowed/warped neck. You should never use it to make the action better, although if the neck is warped a lot if can make the action high.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#12
Quote by AlGeeEater
I'd say lower the action first, and if that doesnt solve it stop being a wimp. You're going to need to build up your calluses which will prevent most of the pain from playing to long.

If the neck isn't straight, adjust the truss rod. Adjust the action SLOWLY, taking a little bit off the bottom of the saddle at a time until it's comfortable to play. Your nut *may* also need to be reslotted, but I don't have any measurements to go by so I cant tell you for sure.

jcwear - adjusting the 'thing under the headstock' commonly known as the truss rod, is not for adjusting the action. Adjusting the truss rod is only to straighten a bowed/warped neck. You should never use it to make the action better, although if the neck is warped a lot if can make the action high.

Chris


Agreed Dont file anything down lol If you can't setup the guitar pay someone else and asked to have the action lowerd.
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#13
Quote by AlGeeEater

jcwear - adjusting the 'thing under the headstock' commonly known as the truss rod, is not for adjusting the action. Adjusting the truss rod is only to straighten a bowed/warped neck. You should never use it to make the action better, although if the neck is warped a lot if can make the action high.

Chris


Aha, So if the action is outrageously high on all strings, like 20mm or something would it be a truss rod job? ... So changing action is a bridge job mainly? I always naivly thought everything was solved with the truss rod.

Sorry for my incorrect advice
#14
Quote by jcwear
Aha, So if the action is outrageously high on all strings, like 20mm or something would it be a truss rod job? ... So changing action is a bridge job mainly? I always naivly thought everything was solved with the truss rod.

Sorry for my incorrect advice

It depends on if the neck is straight or not. If the neck is bowed, then the high action is usually caused by that. Straightening the neck should fix most of the action issues, although you will still probaly have to adjust the saddle.

If the neck is straight, and the action is really high the truss rod should not be touched at all, the saddle or nut has to be adjusted.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#16
algee is correct- for any of the noobs who are goin to try n argue with him- dont

id check the neck first- see if its bowed at all- if so, fix that first

next- start playing elixers. make acoustic guitar alot easier to play n what not

3rd and final sand the saddle- but only if its that bad

and acoustic solos are ****ing hard btw- dont expect it to be easy
#17
just to clear everything up, I ALREADY HAVE CALLUSES, on every other acoustic guitar i've played i had no problems, i don't feel anything. even a friend who had been playing 4 years said that the strings on my acoustic were really tough, and he's really good. some of you don't realise how tough they are, you can just about bend two notes higher, but really hard big bends whilst playing a little fast, is really difficult. it only hurts if i play at the top of the fretboard constantly (should have mentioned that).
It's DEFINATELY not my fingers. it's probably the truss rod not being straight, if not i'll carefully filing down the saddle.

thanks for the advises, really helpful
Last edited by ezequiel89 at Sep 8, 2006,
#18
keep playin till u have calluses then it wont hurt anymore(freakin pansi)
music=life
everything else is just details
#19
There are 3 commen reasons for acoustic guitars feeling tight.

1) the slots in the nut are not deep enough
2) the truss rod is too loose
3) the action is too high

The 1st thing I would suggest looking at is the truss rod because adjusting the truss rod is free and can be undone. Put a capo on the 1st fret and push the low E down at the 14th fret. Now look at the 7th fret and see how much of a gap there is between the fret and the string. It shouldn't be any more than 2mm. If it is more than 2mm then tighten your truss rod 1/4 turn, retune the guitar, play it for 5 min and then check it again. Keep doing this untill the gap at the 7th fret is between 1mm and 2mm.

If the truss rod is adjusted properly the next thing I would look at is the nut. Put your capo on the 1st fret again. Now look at how much space there is between the strings and the 2nd fret. Now take the capo off and look at how much space there is between the 1st fret and the strings. Is the gap about the same as the gap you had between the strings and the 2nd fret when you had the capo on? If the gap is bigger then your nut needs filing down. If I compleatly lost you then take your guitar to a luthier and ask them if the nut needs filed down. Nearly all acoustic guitars that cost less than $400 will need the nut filed down so this really is the most commen issue causing a tight feeling guitar. The only reason I don't suggest you check this 1st is because most people can't file the nut down themselves.

The 3rd and final thing you should look at is the action. If the action is too high then you can sand off the bottom of the saddle.

Lowering the action by filing down the saddle will hurt the tone of your guitar some so it is important that you file down the saddle as a last resort and only after you have checked and made sure the nut was properly adjusted.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Sep 9, 2006,
#20
^ thanks CorduroyEW, that's was an extremely helpful advise, i understand now what to do, hopefully i'll like my acoustic when i fix it, it's got a good tone but i hate playing it. (sorry for late reply)
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#21
Or pay 50 bucks and get it set up well by a guitar tech. I am not as skilled at this stuff as I would like and don't want to screw up my guitar so I take it to a tech that I trust.

DJ

Once set-up properly it will feel like a new guitar, trust me.
#22
^i could imagine it probably will feel great and paying someone to do it would be less worrying for me but i don't have the money right now for that (saving up for more pedals and a tube amp), anyway i like to do things myself, i pretty sure i know what i need to do.
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Fender USA Stratocaster
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Vox V847
MXR MC401 Boost
Roger Mayer Octavia
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Maxon OD-9
Line 6 Tonecore Verbzilla
Boss Space Echo RE-20
Line 6 DL4
Boss TU-2
#23
Quote by ezequiel89
^i could imagine it probably will feel great and paying someone to do it would be less worrying for me but i don't have the money right now for that (saving up for more pedals and a tube amp), anyway i like to do things myself, i pretty sure i know what i need to do.

Pedals and a tube are expensive. If you get your acoustic set-up you will begin to like it again. (I had the same issue, sort of).

And once again a set-up is cheap.

Do you have a guitar tech you trust?

DJ
#24
well not really, but i can probably get someone from my music course, there are people who repair intruments in my college
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Fender USA Stratocaster
Marshall BluesBreaker

Vox V847
MXR MC401 Boost
Roger Mayer Octavia
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Maxon OD-9
Line 6 Tonecore Verbzilla
Boss Space Echo RE-20
Line 6 DL4
Boss TU-2