#1
ok i am in grade nine (just started) and in my music class there is a band type thing forming and i was picked to play a 4 string Fender bass guitar. i play acoustic and i was wondering if there was anything i can do/ learn on my acoustic to get me use to a 4 string bass guitar. my next question is what can i do when i play in front of ppl that wont make me look like an idiot??? thnx for the replys in advaned

KAM
[highlight]MY GUITAR[/highlight]
Quote by TheAmaranth
I once broke a G-String while fingering an A minor.

A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
#2
The best way is to not be anxious, and try to relax. The best way to develop technique and finger strengh, would be to practice. Watch your favorite bass players or bass players in your favorite bands. Copy their technique and follow it for a bit until you start to develop your own original technique.

People are going to flame me for saying "copy the technique", so let me elaborate. What I mean is that when you first start playing, you are fairly clueless without lessons, and you could develop really bad habits. By watching other bass players and copying what they do, you will get all of your fingers in the right positions and doing the right thing. Time for a super cheesy metaphor. Your favorite bass player is not your role model, but your clay model. You start off following him and then once you become better, you begin to shapen his technique and it starts to become your own. After a while, your technique will be rock solid. *rolls eyes at cheesyness*

The basic concept behind that is true. Otherwise, just practice the bass as much as you can. Good technique is something that takes years to learn, probably as you learned earlier. As for making a fool of yourself, you probably won't have to worry. A lot of people don't know what a bassist is supposed to look like, and the only people who are going to recognize faulty technique are other bass players. That is in a sense a good thing, since they can correct you on anything you are doing wrong. Most of all, have fun.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#3
/thread, thanks to Incubus_SCIENCE

Why don't you see if any friends own a electric bass, or try one out at a local music store, just to get an idea before hand.

You'll be fine, don't worry, and do everything Incusbus_SCIENCE told you already.

PT
Schecterman's Accomplice, of the Schecter Stiletto Players Will Rule The World Club. PM Fett13 or Your41Plague12 to join.

EQ:
Schecter Stiletto Extreme 5
Yamaha RBX170
#4
Inky...there is a great quote.. "We all have idols. Play like anyone you care about but try to be yourself while you're doing so"
#5
Quote by Past-time
/thread, thanks to Incubus_SCIENCE

Why don't you see if any friends own a electric bass, or try one out at a local music store, just to get an idea before hand.

You'll be fine, don't worry, and do everything Incusbus_SCIENCE told you already.

PT


ok the school supplise the bass guitar all i have to do is play it which i dont know how to!!!
[highlight]MY GUITAR[/highlight]
Quote by TheAmaranth
I once broke a G-String while fingering an A minor.

A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
#6
Play it like you are playing your acoustic. If you can, play without a pick.

The strings are tuned E-A-D-G (the lowest 4 strings on your acoustic).

The most common way to pluck the strings, is to place your thumb on the pickup (the blocks on the bass where the sound is picked up) and use your finger like a guitar pick. Keep your thumb anchored.

This man, Les Claypool, is where I stole my technique from. Notice how he uses his fingers as picks, and keeps his thumb anchored. You will begin to hear this man's name used a lot as a bass player. For future reference, he is Primus' bassist.


As far as practicing, I suggest going to down the bad room during one of your study halls and go into a back room and just practice. Before I had a bass guitar, I would steal the jazz band bassist' bass back in 7th grade and go back and play it during lunch. I don't think you should steal someones bass, but if it's open to you, use it as much as you can.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#7
Quote by Incubus_SCIENCE
Play it like you are playing your acoustic. If you can, play without a pick.

The strings are tuned E-A-D-G (the lowest 4 strings on your acoustic).

The most common way to pluck the strings, is to place your thumb on the pickup (the blocks on the bass where the sound is picked up) and use your finger like a guitar pick. Keep your thumb anchored.

This man, Les Claypool, is where I stole my technique from. Notice how he uses his fingers as picks, and keeps his thumb anchored. You will begin to hear this man's name used a lot as a bass player. For future reference, he is Primus' bassist.


THANK U THANK U Incubus_SCIENCE U r god thank u very much!!!
[highlight]MY GUITAR[/highlight]
Quote by TheAmaranth
I once broke a G-String while fingering an A minor.

A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
#8
If you can a DVD with of your favorite band, it is even better to watch the bassist. I got a Primus DVD and copied exactly what Les did for about 3 months.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGh2s5krGg

Les makes everything look really easy, and I don't recommend starting with this tune, but his technique is one to die for. He stays in the camera for most of the song, so its easy to figure out what he's doing.

Primus is an acquired taste, and most people don't like them at first. It just slowly grows on you.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#9
thank you all for responding it will help lots i just have one more question should i play like the bassist in korn in the video coming undone cos i think that is really kewl??
[highlight]MY GUITAR[/highlight]
Quote by TheAmaranth
I once broke a G-String while fingering an A minor.

A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
#10
Here is some basic begginer information that I have found somewhat helpfull.

http://fenderplayersclub.com/pdfs/lessons/beginners_bass.pdf

That should cover alot of the basic's and I have come to found out after asking alot of questions is that you should learn the basic scales first. Major and minor and have them down pat. I was told that should spend maybe a week on each one knowing it inside and out. The thing I do after that is what is called the spider. Which you start past the 12th fret and using proper fretting hand technique you play one fret per finger starting at the g string (bottom one) and all the way up to the top e string. After You got the hang of this try mixing it up, by say doing your pinky finger than index finger than middle ect.

Alot of it is fairly boring but should help devolp good hand skills. As I have learned playing guitar is alot like anything in life if you wanna be good you need a good foundation. Which means good technique and ability in the very basic's. Normaly after I am done practicing that I will work on a song I like to play.

Currently I am working on a jazz song http://www.activebass.com/cgi-bin/page_view.pl?l=15767&p=1&a=0

Which is pretty fun to play. I have been told and I believe its probably the best thing to do as well as learn the song perfectly so you can play it like the pro's can. Than move onto the next song. Remember not to expect to much as your just learning. These things are things i have learned and advice taken from a bunch of other people that I have tried and found works for me. Doesnt mean that it will work for you as you will have to find something that suits you but this could not hurt to try.
#11
Fieldy from Korn is not a good example of a good bass player role model.

He does this thing called slapping where he uses his thumb to play. It will give you a very percusive sound, that is hard to use. He plays like a drummer, not a bass player. I suggest following someone else... And replicating his tone on a Fender Jazz is not going to be easy. He tunes his bass very far down and hits his strings really hard. Unless you are joining a metal band, his style of playing isn't going to get you very far.

I suggest following people like Shavo from System of a Down, or the guy from Deep Purple (I'm looking at your favorite artists in your profile).


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#12
ok i have another question the bass guitar is a yamaha p-bass what is that and is it any good?? and wath is the little trap door thing on the back of the guitar???
[highlight]MY GUITAR[/highlight]
Quote by TheAmaranth
I once broke a G-String while fingering an A minor.

A recent study shows that 92% of all teenagers have moved on to rap music. Put this in your sig if you are one of the 8% who stayed with real music.
Last edited by kam3 at Sep 7, 2006,
#13
The "trap door" is probably an active bass guitar, or that is just where all the electronics are located. I don't suggest opening it.



There are many different types of yamaha p-basses. P stands for "precision". Precision is a kind of bass where the pickup is:
Quote by wikipedia
One split pickup, pieces connected in humbucking mode (1957 ? present);
One split "P" pickup and one eight-pole "J" pickup (2 magnets per string) connected in humbucking mode (some later models);
One split pickup and one humbucker (some later models).

The pickups should look something like this:


P-basses will have a very deep, punchy, gritty sound to them (which is great for rock).


The other main type of bass is a j-bass, or jazz bass. It will look something like this:


Notice the pickups look different. That is because they are j-pickups. Jazz pickups are:
Quote by wikipedia
Two eight-pole pickups (2 magnets per string) connected in humbucking mode.

Jazz basses have a much wider range of sound, but don't sound as punchy or deep as a P-bass. They are better for jazz, blues, funk, and some rock.

If you want to follow up more on precision/jazz read this:
http://www.sweetwater.com/shop/bass-guitars/bass-guitars/buying-guide.php#4
Back to Yamaha... Yamaha makes a wide variety of basses... some good, some not so good. Look for a model, or go to this site and tell us which one it looks most like.
http://www.yamaha.com/yamahavgn/CDA/Catalog/Catalog_GSMFCX/0%2C%2CCTID%25253D224000%2C00.html
Also, behind the headstock of the bass there should be a serial number. Look at that. I can't tell you if its a good bass unless I can tell the year and the model.

I hope this helps somewhat.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#14
I purchased the BBN4 III (i.e. the 3rd edition) for £350 from a second hand shop a few months ago. The first thing that attracted me to it was its looks - plain wooden body with no colours on it, and beautiful curves. The fretboard is rosewood and the colour of the rosewood against the body of the guitar is stunning! The fretboard is also slightly longer than many - it has 24 frets, allowing the player to reach two octaves on each string!

Upon picking up the guitar I felt immediately comfortable holding it. It's well balanced and a weight that't not too heavy - but at the same time gives the feeling of a robustly built guitar. I have played gigs with this bass - the previous owner obviously had too due to a few scratches - and it has never needed any form of repair on it.

The guitar comes with two big fat humbucker pickups. I'm not sure what model they are but they are made by Yamaha. Unlike on many basses, there is a distinct difference in tone between the two pickups. Each pickup has a separate volume control nob - and the third nob is meant to be a tone control. There is a noticeable difference between '0' and '10' on each nob, but nothing noticeable in between - my only criticism on this bass.

One of the most impressive things about the guitar is the tone of it when playing slap. It sounds absolutely amazingly good, and the ease of playing is great. Compared to other basses I have tried, such as many more highly-priced guitars such as Fenders, the Yamaha wins in virtually every aspect. Nicer feel, better-weighted, more comfortable to play, nicer tone (to my taste at least) etc.

For a mid-priced bass guitar, I would most definitely reccomend this! If i had played it and not known the price, I would have put it up at around £6-700. A real bargain!


Review I just found for my bass model. I paid £100 for mine, second hand, and am actually quite chuffed with that deal now...



Really, really nice to play. I reccomend...

EDIT: Actually, looking at the picture again, mine has a different head...
Have a nice day
Last edited by Thy Brad at Sep 7, 2006,