#1
i want to know if i used the thickest strings could i tune my entire bass down another octave but i also want to be able to tune it standard would that snap my basses neck its a squier p bass sadly
#3
Dude thats not even gonna work. The tension is going to be so floppy i'd be suprised if it wouldn't pop right out of the nut. Are you sure you don't just mean a full step down, maybe you got octave and a full step down mixed up or something.
#4
Yeah, even a B string feels a little too floppy for my liking. I don't know how'd you do it. Unless you had strings as large as your pinky.
#5
...

Do you have any idea of how muddy and ****ty your tone would be?
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#6
or buy an octaver, probably safer
Seriously though like these guys have sed it wouldnt really work 2 well
#7
Guys I'm pretty sure he means One Full Step (DGCF Low to High) if thats the case then yes a "heavy" guage string would be perfect for that, and it is possible to play in standard tuning aswell. But it would be strongly advised that you get the bass set-up by a professional (tech at a guitar shop) when changing to a heavier guage string, and you should let him know that you plan on playing down-tuned (and make your mind up regarding playing standard or down tuned more, so he can set it accordingly).

If you do mean a Full Octave, eg e a d g to E A D G (eight steps) then no, a custom bass might, possibly be built to accomidate that, but that is extremely unlikely as the lowest standard tuning I have seen is the C# sub contra bass (low C# standard, I think thats 2 and half steps down tuned) that was built for Jauqo IIIX. And yes that would be muddy AS ! and boomy, plus your amp couldn't really out put that tuning very well.

Oh and on second thought if your consider extended range basses, and the tuning/strings used on them it is possible to get close to a ocatave, but not quite. For example Jean Baudin's 9 string has a low C# string and a High Eb string (C#, F#, B, E, A, D, G, C, F, Bb, Eb) and he has 11 stringed basses which could be 2 more low strings (doubtfull) and that is getting close. *Sorry for going on about that
#8
no dude not a step a octave ive used a cotavator and i love the sound but i hate haveing two notes being played at once
#10
Quote by Bumper
I believe the frequency would be too low to hear.

*brown note comes to mind*

I suggest buying a 5 string... a 4 string would be almost unplayable an octave down. It would destroy your bass, and the clicking of the strings would be unbelieveable. Even with a 5 string. Although, you might be able to move your bridge saddles back really far and highten your action a ton (probably doubtful).


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#12
Quote by ARCtrooper225
try here, although, you'll probably need a new nut and maybe even a new bridge, I trying to do that same thing


thanks
#13
The E note you're talking about it E0. It is 20.60Hz. The human ear can only decipher notes above 20Hz. It would be practically impossible to hear. Notes that low don't have enough punch either, unless you have speakers big enough to use it. You'd be better off getting a five string, the 5th fret E on the five string is very deep, but surprisingly punchy, which is what you'll really want to go for.
#15
Quote by Incubus_SCIENCE
*brown note comes to mind*

.

That SP was amazing.

Thats going to sound horrible, I hope you know. There will be no tension on the strings whatsoever. If you want lower octaves, go with a pedal. But if you try and downtune it that far, record it so we can hear.

you just might discover the brown note.
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#16
Quote by ARCtrooper225
what frequency is the lowest note on a grand piano?


I believe the lowest note on a grand piano is C1.
#17
If you WERE to try and throw a bass down an octave -
the only bass I think that MAY work on would be a Dingwall....maybe.
which is designed to have equal tension through all of the strings, so even a B on a 5 would be poppy and tight.

sweet basses...but even then, it would be like playing a garden hose.

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#18
So if the low E is 20Hz and you go down an octave then you're at 10Hz so if you go down another octave you'll have 5Hz which is the brown note?
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#22
Theres actually a company who makes basses that are tuned down an octave lower and it's not conklin or anything.. i forget the name but the strings were huge!!

would be pretty awesome playing those live... CHEST RUMBLING and such

if i could find there website i'd post it... it has sound clips and all
#23
Quote by CanadianLoonie
So if the low E is 20Hz and you go down an octave then you're at 10Hz so if you go down another octave you'll have 5Hz which is the brown note?


The low E is not 20Hz, it's 40.5Hz, so tuned down one octave would be 20Hz, just at the threshold of human hearing (20Hz to 20KHz). So you might just be able to hear it. But why?

Also, the Brown Note doesnt actually exist - it has never been proved. It's a great myth though
#24
^Oh I sort of saw Bumper's post and thought he meant that the standard low E is 20Hz but he meant that's what it is an octave down.

What equipment would you have to have to reproduce a 5Hz signal from a bass if you tuned it down an octave and then used a pedal to put it 2 octaves down. Would that even work?
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#26
Quote by Bumper
I believe the lowest note on a grand piano is C1.


No, the lowest note is an A0 (B0 is the b-string on a five stringer).

Also, to the threadstarter, it would not be possible for a regular bass to tune down a full octave, as the string tension would be way too loose. However, there is a special custom bass which goes down to low c# (three semi-tones lower than what you want.) Here is some information on it: Sub-contra bass

Edit: The supposed brown-note which was on south park in reality is only an Eb, the 11th fret of the e string, at least the pitch on the south park episode (i got the same pitch on my baritone saxophone when i played a low c, and since the bari sax is tuned to Eb, it is an Eb.
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#27
Quote by Applehead
The low E is not 20Hz, it's 40.5Hz, so tuned down one octave would be 20Hz, just at the threshold of human hearing (20Hz to 20KHz). So you might just be able to hear it. But why?

Also, the Brown Note doesnt actually exist - it has never been proved. It's a great myth though


what´s the brown note?
#28
^it's supposedly a frequency that makes you lose bowel control...doesn't exist though
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#30
From wikipedia:
Quote by Wikipedia

The brown note, according to an urban legend, is an infrasonic frequency that causes humans to lose control of their bowels due to resonance. The name is actually metonymy for a common color of feces. Effective frequencies are reportedly between 5 and 9 Hz, below the audible range for humans (generally humans cannot hear sounds below about 20 Hz). However, as the supposed effects are difficult to explain through known medical science and have yet to be verifiably reproduced in a controlled environment, most medical professionals are of the opinion that the brown note, at least as described in the legend, does not exist.

The brown note is unrelated to brown noise.
[edit]

Testing

The note was tested on the television show MythBusters using Meyer Sound subwoofers on par in quantity and quality with those used at major rock concerts.[1] The experimenters on the show tried a series of frequencies between 5 and 10 Hz at 120?160 dBSPL, but they were unsuccessful in producing the rumored effects. They all reported some physical anxiety and shortness of breath, even a small amount of nausea, but this was dismissed by the participants, noting that sound at that frequency and intensity moves air rapidly in and out of one's lungs.

Other researchers have noted flaws in the methodology of the experiment. Rather than test the entire spectrum below 20 Hz, the MythBusters tested only three specific frequencies: 5, 7, and 9 Hz. In addition, the strategy of surrounding the subject with speakers without accounting for phase effects could have resulted in a loss of effective power being transmitted.

Another show, Brainiac: Science Abuse, performed a similar experiment using 22.275 Hz at −30 dB (according to the show's producers used by Japan's Police and tested by the French Military). During the program, they broadcast the note over the air (and into the living rooms of viewers) in an attempt to cause bowel movements among those who had chosen to stay in the room despite repeated warnings and opportunities to leave. It should be noted, however, that no television speakers and very few subwoofers are able to accurately generate sound at this frequency at a significant volume. They also alleged to have confirmed the myth with a subject, but this subject was out of camera shot for all of the piece except at the very beginning. Using an audio editing software it can be seen that brown note doesn't exist anywhere in the soundtrack. Instead, they replaced it with a 91.8 Hz sine wave tone making it audible to the viewers, therefore not having any effect on one's bowels.

In 2003, a team of researchers held a mass experiment where they exposed around 700 people to music laced with 17.5 Hz sine waves, produced by an extra-long stroke subwoofer mounted ? very appropriately ? in the end of a sewer pipe. The experiment took place in the Purcell Room, London. The team was warned against the experiment by physicists (and a person in the local hi-fi store) who were concerned the audience would have to evacuate their bowels in the concert ? but in this double-blind test of the effects of airborne infrasound, the team reported none of the legendary effects. There were many reports of anxiety in the audience ? and of feelings of pressure on the chest. The team was interested in these extreme bass notes as they have been implicated as a possible explanation for ostensible hauntings.[2]

Jürgen Altmann of the University of Dortmund, an expert on sonic weapons, says that there is no reliable evidence for nausea and vomiting caused by infrasound.[3]

Yes, it is insane. Watch episode 17 of season 3 of South Park.


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#32
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