#2
i dont work at a record label but if i did i'd sign you those are some sweet songs
#4
they ok songs, you could get signed, but what does it matter if your doing what you love?
#5
why get signed? because you can make loads of cash. What's better than making money at the thing you love to do in life? Hell, it beats the **** out of school.
#6
To be honest, You really only make money off your merch..
The label keeps most of the money from the album..
and they pay for your tour and album and video, but you have to pay them back.
Yar.
#7
As it is, no.

Pros: band is tight; sound is current but safe and easy to present to the public without challenging the listener much; you're young

Cons:
-A+R people will listen to about 30 seconds of a song before they will decide to keep listening or to give it the switch. Neither of those songs had a big killer hook that made you want to hang on for the ride in the first 30 seconds.
-singer is far from terrible, but if you want a big fat record deal, he needs to be better - as in pretty much bang on all the time. Especially given that A+R people will assume that you've edited the crap out of your demo, and what they are hearing is the end product of as many takes as was necessary to get it as good as it was ever going to get. Given that, if the singer isn't bang on all the time, they will assume that he will be much farther off in a live situation, and will start pulling out the "pass" form letter.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by Valo
To be honest, You really only make money off your merch..
The label keeps most of the money from the album..
and they pay for your tour and album and video, but you have to pay them back.
Yar.


The standard record deal - if there is such a thing - has the artist receiving about a dollar for each unit sold. Yes, out of that comes recoupments which are outlined in the contract and agreed upon by both the artist and the label. If the artist is smart, they have hired a quality entertainment lawyer to point these things out to them.

If the album sells enough to recoup the expenses incurred by the band, then the band stands to make a good amount of money on it. If the album stiffs, the people who fronted the money to make it possible will want their money back. Translation - recoup album sales means no money for the artist.

Now... factor this in.... The label says that you need to sell 100 000 units in order to fully recoup the expenses. People download your stuff like crazy. As a result, even though people are digging it, you only sell 80 000 copies. Not only is the band on the hook for recoupment, the label will also exercise their option drop the band rather than lose money on anothe release, as the band is not able to sustain themselves financially by meeting sales expectations.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Even with the merch... Your CD sales will probably outnumber merch sales by about 10:1, so you'll sell 10 CD's (and make about $20 before relevant recoupments) at the rate of about one shirt. Say... $25. Now.... you've got that big record deal and you're playing arenas and stadiums and theaters and such. Those venues take in the neighbourhood of 15-20% of your merch sales. $25 x 20% = $20.

Touring expenses are often fronted by the label too, and are then also subject to recoupment out of your tour revenues.

If you (er... and the label) are smart, you will launch a quality project - CD, tour production, video, etc. - at a reasonable expense. This is why you are seeing a lot of work going to smaller studios, less money spent on videos, and scaled-down stage productions.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
I listened to the first 2 minutes of the song "Break of dawn" not sure if the other one was better... but I couldn't feel it.

I don't think you'd get signed from that song... those songs may fly in a bar. But not a record label.

The drummer reminds me of the sound from that muppet off seasame street and the singer is boring.

Sorry.
"I don't want to be hostile. I don't want to be dismal.
But I don't want to rot in an apathetic existence either.
"
-Maynard



| |
#11
i find the songs to b reocurring?... they both started off softer.. and turned on distortion after maybe a minute, sounds the same to me? i like the guitars in it though, not so much the vocals.

work on the vocals abit and i think you could get signed.
Quote by NickRaciti
Ladies don't spit.

(they swallow)


Quote by altronataku
The last nine or ten false readings in gravity wave detectors have been due to the gravity field of my nads.
#12
I havent heard the songs but from my experiance of these boards, I dont think that your topic approached the people the way you should have... instead of saying "New cd! Think we could get signed" It would be more professional and approperate to say "Just got back from the studio, please listen" Kindness really gets you so far, then in your body, you say hey does anyone think this is good enough to get signed? That way people are more inclined to listen to your music with an open ear, instead of a closed mine... do you see what im saying? im going to listen to this when i get home and give you my opioon with an open ears and mind
#13
Im sorry but I dont think the singer is good enough for you guys to get signed. The tone is whats the problem. Try singing less nasaly I dont konw, Not much stuff to say, its good guitar and instrumantals, but the vocals dont cut it, at all.
#14
Quote by ovdojoey
Im sorry but I dont think the singer is good enough for you guys to get signed. The tone is whats the problem. Try singing less nasaly I dont konw, Not much stuff to say, its good guitar and instrumantals, but the vocals dont cut it, at all.



Nasaly... good word! It really turned me off too. There is no market for nasel singers.
"I don't want to be hostile. I don't want to be dismal.
But I don't want to rot in an apathetic existence either.
"
-Maynard



| |
#15
http://www.mercenary.com/probwitmusby.html you dont want to get signed... This doesnt happen to some bands, but it does to most. I know countelss local bands that have had this **** happen to them.

EDIT You don't need a record label to go far, they just loan you money, you still have to pay them back. Saosin went farther then 99.9% of bands without signing to a label (yes i know they are signed now.)
Last edited by IlIk2plygUItAr at Sep 10, 2006,