#1
Sorry if i am in the wrong section but i didnt know where else to go.

anyway, i've been playing guitar for almost 3 years and want to take up piano.
so my question is, is there anything wrong with starting off on a keyboard?
i ask this because i have noticed that normal piano keys are a lot heavier than keyboard ones.
any help would be appreciated. thanks!
#3
think of it like this, most people who start guitar start on an acoustic classical guitar which is different from an electric guitar but it will still get you there, just like that, a keyboard will feel different from a real piano but it will not be deterimental to your playing to start on one
#4
I started, and still play on a keyboard. Athough, I'm not looking to get super proffecient and technical at the piano, I'm just looking to gain an understanding of how it works, and using it for a new texture in my band.

So, I'd say go for it.
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#6
Yea, your finger strength and finger independence will be highly affected in the long term.

Because you use so little strength, wait till you try out a real grand steinway 9 foot, it will feel like raise iron casts with each finger.

Maybe hit the keys harder or something to train finger strength etc.
#7
thanks for the advice. i would like to start on a real piano but i have no where to put it and i certainly cant afford one at the moment.
#8
Hmm, I am doing exactly what you are doing, but about half a year earlier . I was advised strongly to get a keyboard with weighted keys, because when it came to play on a real piano (I get lessons at school) it would be very awkward. And I can understand why.

On a weightless keyed keyboard your fingers do very little work and its just a case of getting them there at the right time. In piano you must take note of the dynamic signs, such as p or f, piano and forte (soft and loud). On a weightless you cannot control that, as you do not apply extra or less pressure, it just goes down.

Of course, its not deathly if you have a weightless, but I would strongly advise you not to, as it gets you used to all sorts of bad habits, such as weak fingers, odd position, pressing wrong keys etc.

You do not need to buy a real piano, you just need to get a keyboard with weighted keys. Just a simple one will do, some different instrument sounds if you wish. These cost around £200-£300 ($370-$550)

Good luck mate, its a great instrument.
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#9
im a music major and i just started my piano proficency class.. the instructor recomended we buy a cheap keyboard to practice with.
#10
Nothing wrong with a keyboard.

The thing about acoustic guitars is that usually the neck is thicker so it is harder to play, but with keyboard to piano it's the other way round.
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#11
Quote by notoriousnumber
Hmm, I am doing exactly what you are doing, but about half a year earlier . I was advised strongly to get a keyboard with weighted keys, because when it came to play on a real piano (I get lessons at school) it would be very awkward. And I can understand why.

On a weightless keyed keyboard your fingers do very little work and its just a case of getting them there at the right time. In piano you must take note of the dynamic signs, such as p or f, piano and forte (soft and loud). On a weightless you cannot control that, as you do not apply extra or less pressure, it just goes down.

Of course, its not deathly if you have a weightless, but I would strongly advise you not to, as it gets you used to all sorts of bad habits, such as weak fingers, odd position, pressing wrong keys etc.

You do not need to buy a real piano, you just need to get a keyboard with weighted keys. Just a simple one will do, some different instrument sounds if you wish. These cost around £200-£300 ($370-$550)

Good luck mate, its a great instrument.



Most keyboards today, do have volosity control, Depending on how hard you hit the key is the louder or softer, weighted or unweighted. Some ever have an Aftertouch (when you hit a key soft, and press harder when holding the note, something will change about that sound, Like when you have a violin patch up for example the aftertouch would be a little vibrato).

Honestly, I dont think it will matter, With the way keyboards are you are still going to have to build up strength with your fingers in order to get the note out anyway (unless you have a Mono synth).

Not knocking weighted keys or anything. It just feels weird when playing a sound different to piano (like an organ sound....organs are unweighted naturally and have a different play style).
#12
Quote by uuuuhhhhhhhh
Most keyboards today, do have volosity control, Depending on how hard you hit the key is the louder or softer, weighted or unweighted. Some ever have an Aftertouch (when you hit a key soft, and press harder when holding the note, something will change about that sound, Like when you have a violin patch up for example the aftertouch would be a little vibrato).


You may be able to do that, but it kind of defeats the point of having the dynamics altogether, as you can easily digitally recreate the sound into however you want, rather than actually applying skill into creating the desired effects manually.

Ultimately it comes down to this however you look at it: in order to learn the Piano without a piano, it is better to use weighted keyboards rather than unweighted.
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.
#13
The touch sensitive keys allow for the dynamic phrasing that would usually be missing on a keyboard - but what about the pedals? I know you can get them separately but after getting all the different pieces it would be better looking for a cheap piano.

Keyboard is good and will do what you need it to do, but in the end there are differences like that between an acoustic and electric that make one harder to play if you don't have access to it often and can't adapt to it quickly as a result.
#14
If you are planning on playing actual piano or using a stage piano in the feature, it'll be the best investment you ever made to get a keyboard with weighted or hammer action. Note though, touch sensitivity isn't the same thing.
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