#1
Just curious, who came up with the tuning for guitar, and why this particular arrangement of notes and intervals?
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#2
It's used because it gives a compromise between playing chords and scales with simple fingerings without ridiculous stretches, overlaps or barres - I don't know where it came from.. guess it just evolved.
#3
Yeah. It's possibly the easiest way to get around the fret board when it was created. Also, before the actual guitar there were other forms of string instruments such as the Citole, Fiddle, Cittern, Gittern, Lute which contained many more strings than your new standard guitar. I guess the evolution of guitar would pave a way into the future for more convenient ways around the fret board.

So there really is no way to find out who actually created a standard tunning. =/
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#4
so well thought, right?
Was thinking about different shape of scale...
If you do the first 3 notes on the same string, it would be difficult. Easier to pluck another string for the 3rd note....
standard tuning provides easy shape of chords.. for instance, there is interval of perfect fifth between strings... it forms a certain sequence. all the notes for the triads will be somehow near the same fret

A crazy man in my country tunes his G string semitone higher...
#5
Seems to me like, originally, it might've been dirived from violin/viola/cello tuning, where the strings are a 5th instead of a 4th apart. With the fewer strings, the 5th tuning give you a greater range, but then when going up to six strings, you can bring down the distance between the strings, since you don't need to compensate for the fewer strings anymore. I don't know if this is what someone ever actually thought, but it's something that'd make sense to me.

Also, I dunno which came first, the oud or guitar, but I'd guess the oud, and the oud tunes by 4ths. There's not a change to major 3rd between the 3rd and 2nd string, though, just 4ths all the way across. As far as I've seen, guitar's the only instrument have a variation in tuning across the strings, most follow one rule straight through.
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#7
No it isn't. If it was, you still didn't tell us why it's "all based on the piano".
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#8
I found it interesting that standard tuning is actually in the minority of tunings, the west is really where its mainly used, everywhere else pretty much sticks with open tunings. Not really on topic but interesting nonetheless.
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#9
Quote by yan_kong
A crazy man in my country tunes his G string semitone higher...

If he also tunes his high E string a semitone higher, he has stapled fourths! Great tuning imo
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#11
Is it to do with the fact you have three very common shapes of chords (F, A and D) that you can move all the way up the board easily?
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#12
Quote by BobFromReboot
No it isn't. If it was, you still didn't tell us why it's "all based on the piano".

the standard tuning on guitar is based off the piano arranged in a way that makes chords comfortable to play...taking mostly from european piano players

& like some1 else said,different parts of the world have different tunings for their stringed instruments,but we are talking about standard tuning here

snatched from wiki
The separation of the first (e') and second (b) string, as well as the separation between the third (g), fourth (d), fifth (A), and sixth (E) strings by a 5-semitone interval (a perfect fourth) allows notes of the chromatic scale to be played with each of the four fingers of the left hand controlling one of the first four frets (index finger on fret 1, little finger on fret 4, etc.). It also yields a symmetry and intelligibility to fingering patterns.

The separation of the second (b), and third (g) string is by a 4-semitone interval (a major third). Though this breaks the fingering pattern of the chromatic scale and thus the symmetry, it eases the playing of some often-used chords and scale, and it provides more diversity in fingering possibilities.
Last edited by DeathDealer at Sep 7, 2006,
#13
it is actually based off of the piano, the idea of standard 12 step tuning was in the college level theory book i read and it basically explained that initally there were only 7 notes, but because of the way they were tuned after you went up an octave it started becoming more difficult to divide the wavelengths up equally and a low C would match a middle C mostly but if you went up more than 1 octave it started getting dissonant.....so then they tried 8,9, 10 and so on and eventually when they started divying it up amongst 12 notes they found that it came the closest to notes matching consonance over 4-5 octaves, even though if you take and measure the wavelength of a low C and compare it to a high C you'll see it's still not divyed up perfectly but so close that the average human ear can't tell the difference
#14
We're not talking about 12 tone theory, that's pretty much the standard in western music for every instrument. We're talking about EADGBe.
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#15
Yeah, two totally different things.

Good question, btw...

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#16
It Was Invented By The Spanish
The B String Was Added When They Decided "hey, Let's Have 6 Strings Instead Of 5"
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