#1
I read earlier about tuning it to concert pitch and I was curious what that was.

Also, on another note, I just learned Dee off of the Blizzard of Oz cd and I was wondering how hard people though that was.
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#3
tehcnically concert pitch is considered A 440, which relates to the middle A on a piano... which is standard A tuning , but tuning to normal EADGBE is guitar concert pitch
#4
gotcha, thanks
Quote by flyingjew34
Practice Practice Practice man. You can't get better at anything without practice. Oh, and mustard too.



I play like I'm breaking out of jail.

--Stevie Ray Vaughan
#5
concert pitch is the a note as it sounds on a piano.
Example, a clairnet is a Bb horn, that means it's C sounds the same as a piano's Bb. so basicaly, a concert pitch is a note on a piano, or properly tuned guitar/ bass
#6
z4twenny is half right. If A is 440hz and the rest of your notes are tuned relitive to A 440hz then that is concert pitch.

Concert pitch has nothing to do with the notes you tune your guitar to. You could tune every note on your guitar to E and your guitar could still be in concert pitch. If you tune your guitar to standard tuneing (EADGBE) but you are sharp by 3 cents (443hz) then you are no longer in concert pitch. Old pianos will often be tuned several cents high or low because concert pitch has changed over the years.
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