#1
When I play a song that I am working on I hear what I am pretty sure now is another note rining out behind the note im playing. I think while I am playing that its causing one of the other strings to slightly virbrate, I was wondering if that is normal or... maybe I am not doing something correctly.
#2
This is very common. You need to learn to build up control and mute the other strings with your hands or reduce vibrations as much as possible. The easiest way to solve this, is to use the floating-thumb technique. This is when your thumb on your picking hand mutes the string above the one your are playing, as apposed to resting it on the pickup. Be able to mute as many strings as possible without having it interfering with your playing. For instance, if I am playing on the D string, my thumb would be resting on the A or E string. It takes a little bit of practice to master, but people say you player faster and cleaner with it.

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#3
Alright I can start practicing that, any other ways to mute I should look into?
#4
you'll eventually learn to mute with your fretting fingers as you play. that will take a while and will come into play slowly.
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#5
I am just really careful about my picking and fretting hands. If I'm playing agressively, I make sure I mute the strings I'm not playing on with my fretting hands. I'f I'm playing a more chordal jazz tune (Jaco's Continuum comes to mind), I will use the floating thumb technique to mute the strings with my open thumb.


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#6
Quote by Incubus_SCIENCE
I am just really careful about my picking and fretting hands. If I'm playing agressively, I make sure I mute the strings I'm not playing on with my fretting hands. I'f I'm playing a more chordal jazz tune (Jaco's Continuum comes to mind), I will use the floating thumb technique to mute the strings with my open thumb.


If the string ABOVE is vibrating then your technique needs improvement (I don't mean this as an insult incubus.) When you are finger picking, you should be pulling through the string, letting your finger come to rest on the string above it, preventing it from ringing.

The floating thumb style is useful to mute the E or B strings when playing on A and D (if you are playing a 5 string.) Although it is ver impractical to faster playing as it requires more unessicary hand movement, than resting it on the pickups. Resting your thumb on the pickup also allows you to get a stronger pluck as you have something solid to push against if need be.

Atleast that's what I've always been taught.
#7
I agree with elemenohpee here, you should defo be pulling through to land on the string above. Muting takes a long time to develop good technique that is subconciously done. Youdont even realise that you are now muting, you just do it automatically...
#8
The Floating Tumb Technique works really well for me
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#9
Quote by Applehead
I agree with elemenohpee here, you should defo be pulling through to land on the string above. Muting takes a long time to develop good technique that is subconciously done. Youdont even realise that you are now muting, you just do it automatically...


if i have to think about how im muting i usually have to pause and really think, whereas if im just playing it normally, i can mute now problem.

like applehead and elemenophee said, it just comes with time. my instructor gives me songs that are purposelly hard to mute or require a lot of muting sometimes just to help me develope the tehnique subconsciencely.
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#10
Quote by elemenohpee
If the string ABOVE is vibrating then your technique needs improvement (I don't mean this as an insult incubus.) When you are finger picking, you should be pulling through the string, letting your finger come to rest on the string above it, preventing it from ringing.

When I say above, I mean if you are playing on the A string, the E string is ringing. I have it almost compeltly under control. Its not an audible rining either. It probably happens to you too, you just don't realize. Play any song, and then pause and mute the strings you were playing. The strings you wern't playing will be ringing.


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#11
^ Sympathetic Vibrations. It comes down to physics. One object vibrating a certain frequency will make another object close by vibrate. it mainly happens when you are playing in a key that has an Open string. For example, fret an E on the A string and leave all other strings open. Hear the open E ringing? but you dont really hear the G and the D ringing. The only to stop that is by muting that biatch
#12
Well I can do the thumb technique now things sound alot more cleaner, I tend to try and get in at least a hour practice each day at teh very least, normaly end up getting around 2 to 3 hours a day. At the very least I have noticed that my left hand is much more willing to move properly now. Though got that anoyying habbit of I need new things to learn lol. Can't tell you how bad I wanna learn to slap. Oh well all in good time.
#13
Quote by elemenohpee
If the string ABOVE is vibrating then your technique needs improvement (I don't mean this as an insult incubus.) When you are finger picking, you should be pulling through the string, letting your finger come to rest on the string above it, preventing it from ringing.

The floating thumb style is useful to mute the E or B strings when playing on A and D (if you are playing a 5 string.) Although it is ver impractical to faster playing as it requires more unessicary hand movement, than resting it on the pickups. Resting your thumb on the pickup also allows you to get a stronger pluck as you have something solid to push against if need be.

Atleast that's what I've always been taught.


i started with the floating thumb technique, because i thought it was easier. Then i started playing music that involved me moving from string to string quickly, and it just buggered up my playing. I agree with you whole-heartedly on this idea elemenophee...i switched, and my playing is so much better. Your finger should mute the string above it because it touches it, but only enough to stop all vibrations.
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#14
Now I am confused, its normaly the e string that rings the loudest out of everything and i know the other finger should mute the string directly above. but its never the string above that rings its normaly the e string that rings.. Also think the a string rings a bit when I play on the g string... So what is the best technique to use to stop this?
#15
...............................

have you read any of the posts?
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#16
No normaly I try and guess at what people are saying instead of reading the post. Accualy I am kidding, no I found out what I needed to know from a diffrent place.

But
i started with the floating thumb technique, because i thought it was easier. Then i started playing music that involved me moving from string to string quickly, and it just buggered up my playing. I agree with you whole-heartedly on this idea elemenophee...i switched, and my playing is so much better. Your finger should mute the string above it because it touches it, but only enough to stop all vibrations.


is what confused me because it seemed like he was saying I should not keep my thumb on the e. I found the easiest thing for me is to keep my thumb on the e and when I play on the g string I will just use my pinky to mute the a. That was a technique I ran across and works good for me.
#17
Quote by Sturek
No normaly I try and guess at what people are saying instead of reading the post. Accualy I am kidding, no I found out what I needed to know from a diffrent place.

But


is what confused me because it seemed like he was saying I should not keep my thumb on the e. I found the easiest thing for me is to keep my thumb on the e and when I play on the g string I will just use my pinky to mute the a. That was a technique I ran across and works good for me.


ok, good luck with it then. just keep practicing it and you'll keep developing it.
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#18
Quote by Sturek
is what confused me because it seemed like he was saying I should not keep my thumb on the e. I found the easiest thing for me is to keep my thumb on the e and when I play on the g string I will just use my pinky to mute the a. That was a technique I ran across and works good for me.


That's what we were saying.

When you are playing you should be pulling through the string into the next one up. So if you are playing on the a string you would be also muting the E string with your playing fingers. (Your fingers should come to 'rest' on the E string for a breif second which is why it mutes.) Pulling the string up away from the pickup is bad technique (unless you are of course popping.)