#1
Hey guys, I've been playing the guitar for a few months now and I've gotten down a few easy songs with open chords but I want to learn some barre chords. The problem is the tabs that I search for, which have barre chords, seem to have a whole bunch of combinations of them. Can anyone give me some suggestions for songs which only have like one or two of them along with open chords so that the whole song doesn't song like **** whenever I try and play? Any help is appreciated.
#3
The trick to most barre chords is to think of them the way you would an E or A chord (and
sometimes a C). An E chord uses the G string 1st fret, D string 2nd fret, and A string 2nd
fret. Replace the normal fingers you would use with your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th fingers so that
your first finger is available. Your first finger then becomes the barre.

Let's say you want to play a G major barre chord... Your first finger would barre at the third
fret, your second finger plays the fourth fret on G, Your 3rd will play the 5th fret A string,
and 4th finger on D string 5th fret.

If you get this concept, then you're ready to move on.

To make it a G minor chord, drop your second finger. To make it a dominant 7 (G7) chord,
keep your second finger on the G string and drop your 4th finger. To make it a minor 7,
use the barre plus your third finger on the A string 2 frets up from the barre.

Look at how these concepts relate to the open E chord, the "Holy Grail" of Rock and Roll.
The first finger is merely taking the place of the nut (all open strings) by moving the open
strings to wherever you barre with your first finger.

The same concept applies to A chords, but I don't want to be boring and tell you all the same things as I did with the E chord.

There are, basically, 2 important things to playing barre chords: knowing where the root
(main note, or tonic) of the chord is on the fingerboard, and knowing how to play a major,
minor, dominant 7, or minor 7 chord based on the string where your tonic is.

There are fancier chords, there are more extensions, there are other forms, but get these
basics down before you try to move to fancier stuff. Don't let the fancy stuff distract you,
pay attention to major, minor, and maj/min 7's. Once you get that down, then worry about
the fancy stuff.

I hope this helps, it's 4:00 am, I just got home from a gig, and I can't get to sleep.
Maybe my insomnia can be useful to someone.
#4
Oh, yeah... Easy song with only a couple of barre chords; Hotel California (Eagles), Just Like Heaven (the Cure), Feel Like Makin Love (Bad Company), blah, lots more. Any song, even with open chords, can include barre chords if you choose to use them.

You mentioned tabs... to figure out what barre chords they are using in tabs, you need
to pay attention to the patterns they use. If you don't recognize these patterns, ask again later, and I might be willing to tell you; or else find someone who can help in person.
#6
Any particular genre?

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
Any particular genre?

Chris


Yea, I probably should have mentioned that. I'm mostly into classic rock but also a few newer bands that I'm into; like Nirvana, Incubus, Smashing Pumpkins...
#9
^ what that guy said, it gives your finger a great workout, and it's got a simple rhythm to follow.
it all ends in tears anyway....
#10
A song that helped me out with barre chords was Jane Says by Jane's Addiction. It's uber easy and fun to play.
#11
Proud Mary is great for practicing beginning barre chords. Most of the song is D and A, except for one line leading into the chorus where you sit on Bm for two whole bars. No fast changes, no fancy in and out of barres, etc.

Intro: CCAm... CCAm....CCAmGFFFFFD
Vs: D.......
Br: A.....Bm......
Ch: D..... (end chorus with intro)

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Thanks for the suggestions, everybody. Now it's time for me to practice!