#1
im just wondering, what's the difference between fretboards made out of different woods? for e.g., ebony, maple, rosewood etc. does it affect sound? or does it affect playability?

thanks in advance
#2
It's more of a looks thing. Some people say it affects your tone a bit, but I don't believe it.
- FJ

Quote by Landover Baptist Church
If you find [balloons in his bedroom], it is a sign that Satan may have taken your child by the hand and skipped off together to see the movie, Up without your knowledge.


#3
i think ebony is supposed to make it sound more compressed. i dont really hear any difference though.
PM me for
#4
sometimes some styles of wood are built into the body and makes it easier to do solos, but if it doesn't say "straight through neck" on the statistics, there is no difference. Straight through necks are one big hunk of wood that the fretboard is not glued to the body which for some reason makes it easier to play...
#5
Maple - Very bright and dense, highly reflective. Great amounts of higher overtones and its tight, almost filtered away bass favors harmonics and variations in pick attack.

Rosewood - The most common fretboard, naturally oily, and works well for any surface that sees frequent human contact. The sound is richer in fundamental than maple because the stray overtones are absorbed into the oily pores

Ebony - Has a snappy, crisp attack with the density of maple, but with more brittle grains, oilier pores, and a stronger fundamental tone than maple. Good amount of percussive overtones in the pick attack, that mute out shortly thereafter to foster great, long, sustain. Also looks darker than rosewood.
"Play with your ears" - Yngwie Malmsteen, Paul Gilbert
Thats what she said...
UGmusic
#6
Quote by madpickin03
Maple - Very bright and dense, highly reflective. Great amounts of higher overtones and its tight, almost filtered away bass favors harmonics and variations in pick attack.

Rosewood - The most common fretboard, naturally oily, and works well for any surface that sees frequent human contact. The sound is richer in fundamental than maple because the stray overtones are absorbed into the oily pores

Ebony - Has a snappy, crisp attack with the density of maple, but with more brittle grains, oilier pores, and a stronger fundamental tone than maple. Good amount of percussive overtones in the pick attack, that mute out shortly thereafter to foster great, long, sustain. Also looks darker than rosewood.


what he's trying to say is that ebony pwns...

but i find that the differences in tone that the fretboard wood makes are negligible, especially when youre using distortion and the like. as far as the feel of the woods go for me, ebony>maple>rosewood