#1
Hey people

I was wondering if anyone knows the key the plug in baby - muse was written in? I tend to go crazy when i cant figure out what key a song is written, especially one that sounds so unique. D major / E Dorian (Same scale different root note) seem to work, but there are some unexplained notes in there...

any ideas?

Hugh
#2
the riff is in B harmonic minor. the verse is in G major with and added b5 note during F#5 and the chorus is in G major with an added b3 note. thats just how I interpret it.
"My style is impetuous. My defense is impregnable, and I'm just ferocious. I want your heart. I want to eat his children. Praise be to Allah!" -Mike Tyson
#3
yeah man that sounds about right, the only thing thats niggling me are the extra notes he throws in to give it that kind of carnival flavour u know?

like in the case of b harmonic minor in the riff, he uses a tritone (flat 5) a flat 7, a maj 6th, is he like mixing scales or what? Its like hes take the b harmonic and added more
#4
Quote by itchy_monkey
yeah man that sounds about right, the only thing thats niggling me are the extra notes he throws in to give it that kind of carnival flavour u know?

like in the case of b harmonic minor in the riff, he uses a tritone (flat 5) a flat 7, a maj 6th, is he like mixing scales or what? Its like hes take the b harmonic and added more


theres different ways of looking at it but the easiest way IMO is to say that he is using the B harmonic minor with chromatic notes added in. The chromatic notes are what give it that carnival sound. Carnival music uses tons of chromatic notes. If that b5, b7, and 7 were in key then they wouldnt sound so odd.
"My style is impetuous. My defense is impregnable, and I'm just ferocious. I want your heart. I want to eat his children. Praise be to Allah!" -Mike Tyson
#8
Whenever those extra chromatic notes are thrown in that's just a bebop scale, in this case its a b minor bebop.
#9
Why did you bump a 7 year old thread for that?!

Anyway, it's not a "bebop scale", it's just a few chromatic notes thrown in for some extra tension. There's no need to find a scale that applies to every single note that's played, especially when these "extra chromatic notes" are better explained individually. I find it rather counter-productive in this case.

Vanstuben's second post says it all, really. Though I don't necessarily agree with the fact that it's B harmonic minor. The intro (which includes the riff people are talking about) is in D major. Not only is it not in B, there's also actually an A note in the I chord. Of course, that chord is followed by a III chord (F#), which has an A# in it, so using an A# over that chord is just normal.

So it's really D major + non-diatonic chord tones + chromatic tension-building notes (for instance these #2s that pull towards 3s).
#10
The F# is the V in B minor, the first part of the riff is in B minor but flirts with D major when it gets to the D arpeggio. Throughout the piece it jumps back and forth.
#12
No chord is played for the first 4 bars but the second time around you will find that the beginning of the intro is given an F#. F# is a chord native to Bm but it is not native to D. The run then climbs a B minor scale starting with A#, which would be used in Bm but not as much in D major. When the D chord first plays that you are talking about, the intro is now playing around with D major.
#13
You do get III chords in major keys pretty often, usually before vi or IV chords. They are obviously related to the use of the V in minor keys and they work similarly.

That A# is there because it implies the F# chord. Though I guess it ends up being B harmonic minor for the duration of that chord. It's not that far-fetched, since it's sort of related.