#1
me again..haha so i need a site/link that will teach me the theory behind the blues scale..i have jazz class tmrw..and i want the threory behind it..not the patterns or w/e im trying to figure it out with all that tritone stuff..but i want an "official" explination help!
#3
EDIT: Nevermind, I was thinking of something else!
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Sep 10, 2006,
#4
wtf! swweeeett..i never knew about that site..thats guna help me alot... thanks i love you
#5
Quote by kirbyrocknroll
Take a certain blues scale and compare it to the same respective major scale. Then compare the degrees.

So let's take the A blues scale.

Ok, the A major scale is:

A B C# D E F# G#

The A blues scale is:

A C D# E F

So let's comparre the two. Compared to the A major scale, the A blues scale has:

1-b3-4-5-b7

So there's your formula if that's what you're asking.


The A blues scale is... A - C - D - Eb - E - G.

The formula is 1 - b3 - 4 - b5 - 5 - b7. (You can spell it differently, but that's pretty much the standard way)

1 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b7 is the minor pentatonic, Brando... but I don't know how you got that from A C D# E F... which would be... 1 - b3 - b4 - 5 - b6. Be careful with your spelling.
Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Sep 10, 2006,
#6
thanks alot..i knew the formula and everything so you derive it from major correct? but is there any theory behind it..not formula...maybe im asking the wrong question..but thanks..so ots first..minor third....perfect fourth.....diminished fourght...perfect fifth.... and then minor sixth ...correct?
#7
um... it's actually derived from a MINOR scale. A minor is A B C D E F G, so the A minor blues just takes out the B and the F and adds an Eb. I know what you're thinking... "so why does my blues progression have major chords?" because the minor third, C, is supposed to contrast with the C# in the I chord, A. the D and E aren't minor either, probably just because the major chords sound stronger. The blues scale/progression is basically a jumble of major and minor elements mixed together. The theory is a bit tricky to interpret. Oh and just so we have it straight, it's 1 b3 4 b5 5 7. if you really want to avoid duplicating scale degrees you could even spell it 1 b3 4 b5 bb6 b7.
"You are amazed that it is so easy to infect men with the war fever, and you surmise that man has in him an active instinct for hatred and destruction... I entirely agree with you."

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Last edited by Dan Steinman at Sep 10, 2006,
#8
ohh okay thanks...cleared most of what i wanted..im not advanced as i should be..playing for about a year..but yeah thanks..cleared alot for me...
#9
Quote by Johnljones7443
(You can spell it differently, but that's pretty much the standard way


How else do you spell it?
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.
#10
Quote by notoriousnumber
How else do you spell it?


Some people prefer to spell it 1 - b3 - 4 - b5 - bb6 - b7 to avoid any duplicate note names.

But with that, anyone new to music theory won't see the bb6 as functioning as a perfect fifth, and then won't recognise the b5 as a passing tone, so most people opt to spell it with a 5 just to emphasize the roll of the b5.
#11
Quote by Johnljones7443
Some people prefer to spell it 1 - b3 - 4 - b5 - bb6 - b7 to avoid any duplicate note names.

But with that, anyone new to music theory won't see the bb6 as functioning as a perfect fifth, and then won't recognise the b5 as a passing tone, so most people opt to spell it with a 5 just to emphasize the roll of the b5.


Ahh, I thought you were talking about spelling a completely different scale. Thanks though.
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.