#1
i was reading thru this article

http://tinyurl.com/orxh3

and i was understanding everything up until the ascending and descending part. i posted this question at the bottom:

i was understanding everything up until the ascending and descending part. now i am entirely lost. are you refering to the exact same scale (e.g. C melodic minor)? does the melodic minor scale stretch into the 9th dimension of space/time? do major scales do this? how does one know which to use when improvising? cuz sometimes you're going all over the place, not just in continuous, linear progression.

but i figured i might get a quicker response here. so what's the deal with that?
#2
ok so a melodic minor scale is based off of a natural minor scale.
a melodic minor scale is simply the natural minor scale with the 6th and 7th scale degrees both raised.

but here's the tricky part: the thing that makes melodic minor weird is that when descending, it is played as the natural minor scale (with the 6th and 7th scale degrees lowered back to normal).
#3
It's my understanding that the only reason this is done is for the purpose of creating a larger number of chords. Nowadays, the decending pattern is rarely used.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 12, 2006,
#4
It's simple. If you hit the 7th or 6th from a note lower than said note, you play natural 7ths and 6ths (ascending). If you hit the 7th or 6th from a note higher than said note, you play natural 7ths and 6ths (descending).

In practice, this is goofy and it is completely acceptable to play the melodic minor the same ascending and descending.

Also, as far as I know, melodic minor is the only scale that you play differently asceding and descending.

Quote by Archeo Avis
It's my understanding that the only reason this is done is for the purpose of creating a larger number of chords.
It is to make there be s trong pull to the root on the way up, and a strong pull to the 5th on the way down.
#5
^ What bgc said. In jazz you can ignore the fact that it's different descending, and you can play it both up and down with the natural 6s and 7ths.
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#6
Quote by psychodelia
^ What bgc said. In jazz you can ignore the fact that it's different descending, and you can play it both up and down with the natural 6s and 7ths.
I've actually heard people call it the jazz scale when they play it the same up and down.
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I've actually heard people call it the jazz scale when they play it the same up and down.



Thats what i call it
But i still know its correct name.
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#8
C major: C D E F G A B C
Intervals: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1

C Melodic Minor: C D Eb F G A B C
Intervals: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7 1

so in the key of C i can't just play the E-flat scale and expect to get the harmonic minor that way, huh? these harmonic and melodic minor scales have their own patterns on the fretboard, as in the ionian, dorian, and vegetarian scale patterns. I gotta learn 2 entirely new sets of patterns... oh my, i've gone cross-eyed.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I've actually heard people call it the jazz scale when they play it the same up and down.

I've heard people call it the jazz minor. Awful name imo

Sethp: Just take it easy with the learning. It are awful patterns to use, but you'll get the hang of it eventually!
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