#1
hey,
I think this seemed the right place to ask this..........

I was wondering if it were possible to record a full band straight on to computer and what would be needed etc.
I have several recording programs, Ableton Live, Cubase SX, Logic Pro 5, Line 6 Riffworks and Reason 9. The ones I can use the easiest are Ableton,Riffworks and Reason. does anybody know if it is possible, miking up the drum kit and putting it through the pa and then linking the pa into my computer, and then doing the same with the other instruments? I have the adapter on my computer to put a line-in (a jack socket).
#2
yes, it is possible. you need mics to mic everything, a way for the mics to go to the computer, and a program to record. and cables to connect everything. lots of ways to do that, look around this forum for ways that other people recomend and use.
#3
why did you feel the need to steal 2000 dollars worth of software if you have no idea about anything about recording?

Adam
Quote by ollie_12318
my grandma is dying and my mum wants me to play something on bass for her, any body got any suggestions?!

Quote by splinter26
another one bites the dust has a pretty cool bass line
#4
You need to spend a lot of money to do this. If you just want to record drums + 2 guitars + bass + vocals for as cheap as possible with pretty decent quality you should get a recording interface like the presonus firepod that has 8 mic inputs. One mic for each guitar cab, one for bass (or you could go direct) one for a vocal mic, and 4 for drums.

That runs at about $600. Then you need about 4 shure sm57's (guitar cabs and bass, one for snare), a shure sm58 for vocals, two small diaphragm condensers for drum overheads, and a shure kick drum mic (not sure what it's called). This is expensive ****, definitely over $1000.

Plug them all in to the firepod, assign each firepod input it's own track in your sequencer, press record.
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#5
Quote by adammarshall409
why did you feel the need to steal 2000 dollars worth of software if you have no idea about anything about recording?

Adam



you know what happens when we ASSUME dont you?

it makes an ASS out of U and ME

maybe he inherited from his rich uncle

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#6
Quote by adammarshall409
why did you feel the need to steal 2000 dollars worth of software if you have no idea about anything about recording?

Adam



for your info I do know alot about recording, just not a full band, and I am asking if it is possible to do with a full band what I do with my acoustic guitar, piano and voice and laptop. I am a solo artist and I have recorded two of my own albums without any help.

And yes when people assume they are normally wrong, I didnt steal the programs, I know a lot of people in the music business and they are given to me all the time.
#7
Quote by Muphin
You need to spend a lot of money to do this. If you just want to record drums + 2 guitars + bass + vocals for as cheap as possible with pretty decent quality you should get a recording interface like the presonus firepod that has 8 mic inputs. One mic for each guitar cab, one for bass (or you could go direct) one for a vocal mic, and 4 for drums.

That runs at about $600. Then you need about 4 shure sm57's (guitar cabs and bass, one for snare), a shure sm58 for vocals, two small diaphragm condensers for drum overheads, and a shure kick drum mic (not sure what it's called). This is expensive ****, definitely over $1000.

Plug them all in to the firepod, assign each firepod input it's own track in your sequencer, press record.



I have all the mikes needed, including the drum mikes plus a powerful pa, I willhave a look around for the firepod you mentioned and see if i can pick one up second hand or something.

Thanks man , appreciated
#8
i dont believe you.

Adam
Quote by ollie_12318
my grandma is dying and my mum wants me to play something on bass for her, any body got any suggestions?!

Quote by splinter26
another one bites the dust has a pretty cool bass line
#9
Quote by Muphin
You need to spend a lot of money to do this. If you just want to record drums + 2 guitars + bass + vocals for as cheap as possible with pretty decent quality you should get a recording interface like the presonus firepod that has 8 mic inputs. One mic for each guitar cab, one for bass (or you could go direct) one for a vocal mic, and 4 for drums.

That runs at about $600. Then you need about 4 shure sm57's (guitar cabs and bass, one for snare), a shure sm58 for vocals, two small diaphragm condensers for drum overheads, and a shure kick drum mic (not sure what it's called). This is expensive ****, definitely over $1000.

Plug them all in to the firepod, assign each firepod input it's own track in your sequencer, press record.

thats basicly it, its expensive, but if you really are serious its worth it. and if you're really really serious about recording, get an eq board as well.
~gtrfrk


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#11
I have 2 sound cards in my computer (which basically works as a 2 channel mixer - i can EQ my bass drum different to my overheads), record drums (i use audition so i can have both sound cards recording their seperate things at the same time) and record the guitars going through a pedal into the puter and vox over the top. You can get some good recording if you set up your mics well.

Live recording is heaps harder - you'll need some really good mics + a mixer, but i guess you could get away with it if you had 6 sound cards or something with the guitars going straight into the puter.
#12
I depends on how complicated you want to get. By miking up the kit and plugging everyone else into the PA, you can do a 'live on the floor' recording. You just need to run the line out (not the powered outs) to the computer's line in jack. This works well. It's not the ideal setup if you want a good pro-sounding recording, and probably won't unless you have someone good at the mixer.

Using this same setup, you can also record just the drums onto one stereo track, then go back and overdub the other instruments one by one. This will give you much better control over the overall sound of the mix.

I tend to like sending each part of the drum kit to its own track in my recording software (Cakewalk Sonar 4). To do that, you do need a heavy-duty sound card and some exteral gear.

I have an M-Audio Delta 1010LT sound card, which gives me 8 analog inputs. I use an Alto L20 mixer that has direct outputs on the first 12 channels. That means I can use 8 mics for a drum track and tap the signal of each individual strip on the mixer and send that directly to the 8 analog inputs on my sound card. I will usually record the drums first, along with one of the guitarist or bassist playing along. We then overdrub the other tracks.

This is my setup and te way it's connected. The rackmount dynamic processors are obviously optional, but do help.


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#13
I got a Firepod, and my drums all setup nice. I'm going to be recording a live session with my band next tuesday, 3 guitars, vocals + drums (maybe bass too if she can make it). Two of the guitars will plug into my Firepod's hi-Z inputs. I will use a condensor mic for the vocals, and the other one as a drum overhead. I will use a tom mic on the kick and the snare mic on the snare. that's 6/8 inputs. That leaves 2 left, another input will will be used to mic the electric bass guitar using my kick drum mic, thats 7/8 inputs. For the third guitar, I'll either see if I can get a DI box or mic the amp with another tom mic. The tom mic just might work, it has similar frequency characteristics as a guitar amp.

ok here's the breakdown
Input 1: Lead guitar (Hi-Z input)
Input 2: Rythm guitar (Hi-Z input)
Input 3: Rythm guitar (DI box, or tom mic)
Input 4: Electric bass guitar (micced amp using kick drum mic)
Input 5: Vocals (Condensor mic, +48V)
Input 6: Drum Overhead *Condensor mic, +48V)
Input 7: Bass drum (tom mic)
Input 8: Snare drum (snare mic)

I use Cubase SX3 and a Presonus Firepod to do my live recording. It lets me record each track on my computer with a 2ms delay (I also got a kickass computer so I can handle the low latency). The firepod costs roughly $800, you can find them for cheaper but it'll be hard to find a second hand model as they are still fairly new.
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#14
you could record a live sound with a condenson in the middle of the room? there are a few problems with this though
In/Rainbows
#15
Quote by Mr. 37
you could record a live sound with a condenson in the middle of the room? there are a few problems with this though


who are you talking about?
Quote by les_paul_01
In Soviet Russia, song copyrights you!
#16
ummm.. im not sure but if youre recording all these things in the same room, wont there be massive bleeding going on?
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#17
Probably would be in the condensor mics, but [depending on the room size and charactarists] you can still achieve a relatively good sound by correctly positioning your mics and using noise filters and other instruments.
Quote by les_paul_01
In Soviet Russia, song copyrights you!
#18
like the other dude said. depends how much money u got. i have a studio that costs around 5000$ but its a professional stuff. that also paid for drywall ect. do it in ur garage or a place ur got extra room.
#19
Quote by Muphin
You need to spend a lot of money to do this. If you just want to record drums + 2 guitars + bass + vocals for as cheap as possible with pretty decent quality you should get a recording interface like the presonus firepod that has 8 mic inputs. One mic for each guitar cab, one for bass (or you could go direct) one for a vocal mic, and 4 for drums.

That runs at about $600. Then you need about 4 shure sm57's (guitar cabs and bass, one for snare), a shure sm58 for vocals, two small diaphragm condensers for drum overheads, and a shure kick drum mic (not sure what it's called). This is expensive ****, definitely over $1000.

Plug them all in to the firepod, assign each firepod input it's own track in your sequencer, press record.



are you looking for subkick? i think thats whats its called
As in, gobias a cup of coffee
#20
for your info I do know alot about recording,

Good. Can you teach me something?

Back to business.

Do you absolutely require tracking the entire band all at the same time? Some bands needs this, some bands do not. It's always cheaper to focus on drums and then overdub the rest.

I couldn't imagine this recording turning out that well. It may be smarter for the band to go ahead and hire an experienced engineer to do at least the drums and the overdub the rest at home. Just a thought. If I was in this situation, this is what I would recommend. (Of course, I'm experienced engineer, so I guess I would just record it myself).

Brandon