#1
My Drummer recently quit, and i really love the songs i've made on my guitar, and he said i can't keep them yet i of course have rights to all songs since i made them up, but he has the drum part. I am willing to buy the rights to them, but am not sure how to go about this. Mainly dealing with paperwork (nothing like big, mind you) but he's going to go into a punk band with an old friend and i want to continue my music, what should i do?
#2
take your songs dude..hes just a drummer. you wrote them, he played a beat to them.
Tool kicks ass
#3
Yeah, I'm pretty sure he has no rights to those songs.
Fender Highway One Stratocaster
Seagull S6+Cedar
Yamaha Pacifica
Epiphone Valve Special
Boss OD-3
Boss DS-1
Dunlop Jimi Hendrix Wah
#4
You can't own a beat or rhthym.

And what kind of friend charges another friend for a piece of a fucking song they wrote?

He's just trying to get your money.
#5
dude drummers dont have any rights to songs if they didnt write the lyrics or any guitar like chords progressions of solos. unless he came up with some really funky and clearly distinguishable beat that you later use. highly unlikely. keep the song
#8
this is completely off topic, but i cant find this info anywhere and a couple friends told me this....Zakk Wylde isnt dead is he?
#11
You can't own a beat or rhthym.

And what kind of friend charges another friend for a piece of a fucking song they wrote?

He's just trying to get your money.


Well he hasn't said anything like that, just that i couldn't use the beats, and it was just an idea if i had to buy them then i would, but you all have proved clearly to me that i don't have to do that. All 6 of ya too boot
#12
When a song is copyrighted, the "song" is defined as the combination of the words and the melody. In other words, none of the following count:

- title
- chord progression
- drum beat (unless it is *so* unique that it is a "compositionally important element" of the song.... thinking Walk This Way, or the "solo" part of Wipeout.)
- rhythmic material
- bass line (*unless it is melodically significant!!*) Bass line for Low Rider would be certainly melodically significant, but bass line for Johnny B. Goode is not.

That's right... NONE of those count. Don't worry about it.

A guitar solo is considered melodic content, and would, therefore, be considered as part of the composition.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
When a song is copyrighted, the "song" is defined as the combination of the words and the melody. In other words, none of the following count:

- title
- chord progression
- drum beat (unless it is *so* unique that it is a "compositionally important element" of the song.... thinking Walk This Way, or the "solo" part of Wipeout.)
- rhythmic material
- bass line (*unless it is melodically significant!!*) Bass line for Low Rider would be certainly melodically significant, but bass line for Johnny B. Goode is not.

That's right... NONE of those count. Don't worry about it.

A guitar solo is considered melodic content, and would, therefore, be considered as part of the composition.

Chris


Wow, thanks a lot, i now can see i have nothing to worry about. Besides even if there was noe of this, i was the one who made the songs up on guitar, and he was the one who left.
#14
copyright them as you, as long as you didnt do it as a band, their noones till someone copyrights them.
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#15
Two things....
1. It doesn't matter who left. It only matters who wrote (ie. owns) the songs.
2. On a technical level, a song is legally copyrighted as soon as it is conceived. There is no "race ya to the copyright office." The trick is *proving* who owned the song first (ie. who wrote it).

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by qwertyasdfzxc
this is completely off topic, but i cant find this info anywhere and a couple friends told me this....Zakk Wylde isnt dead is he?


That's retarded.
Quote by Briyan_15
I think this man has a reputation to defend and "poop head" is not in that reputation.


Quote by omegasus
RUSSELL! WHAT THE ****!!!!
#17
Quote by axemanchris
Two things....
1. It doesn't matter who left. It only matters who wrote (ie. owns) the songs.
2. On a technical level, a song is legally copyrighted as soon as it is conceived. There is no "race ya to the copyright office." The trick is *proving* who owned the song first (ie. who wrote it).

Chris


Ok, now since its was only guitar and drums, and none of the guitar parts came from my drummer that would indeed make them my songs, correct?
#18
If you burn it to a cd under your name, its yours.
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#19
mate unless you are signed and doing some distribution deal i wouldnt worry about it. If you make it big and he sues you he will have a ****e lawyer anyway lol
#20
Is the guitar part playing chords, or an indentifiable *melody?* If the guitar is only chugging out chords and stuff, and the drummer is just keeping a beat, from a copyright standpoint, you don't have a song to worry about, but something that may ultimately be an accompaniment to a song that gets written at some point in the future. No words or melody = no song.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#21
If you guys dont even have a bass player, i doubt he will sue you over the rights to the song. Tell him he can keep his stupid beat, and have your new drummer come up with a better beat to your song.
Not Enough AssHatery
#22
This same thing happened to me, but with my bassist
What if you re-record the song with someone else on drums, and mabye a modified drum beat?
Gonna Leave this town

Gotta leave this town

Gonna make a whole lotta money

Gonna be big yeah...
(Jimi Hendrix - Hear My Train A Comin')

flickr
#23
try asking Dirk_gently he is ug's resident "legal eagle" so he'd know what he's talking about for sure
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#24
definately ask dirk gently and yes the melody i would keep if i were you, as for the beat you can pretty much modify it in almost ANY way and it wouldn't be copyright infringment as in the Vanilla Ice VS Queen case waaaay back when
#26
Quote by add45
This same thing happened to me, but with my bassist
What if you re-record the song with someone else on drums, and mabye a modified drum beat?


Similar thing here too. I was working with a bass player who came up with a four-bar melody.... arguably eight bars, but whatever. I used this melody as the basis for a song, had the song all finished, and then he pulled out. He said he didn't want me to use the bassline (yeah, his four-bar melody), as it was special to him because he wrote it for his wife.

So, even though I borrowed some melodic content from that bassline for the basis of the first line or so of the verse, the rest of the song was different enough (uh.... because he only came up with four bars....) that I consider it a secondary part of the song, and my part is more like 90% of the melodic content. Besides, the vocal melody was based on his bass line, not an exact copy. I then had to re-write the bassline to have a similar effect (because, based on the tonality and melodic structure, it was integral to the mood of the song), but be significantly different enough from the original so as to avoid any allegation of stealing his melody. In the end, I came up with something way better, but what a pain in the neck.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.