#1
I've been wanting to learn theory for quite a while and just never got around to getting a teacher. I mainly want to learn theory to compose riffs, construct chords and to harmonize and create melodies, but I've just heard varying things about theory. I've heard that it's the best thing you can do with your musical career and then people I know who have learned theory say that once you start writing, you throw all theory out the window. What should I do?
2005 Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Marshall JCM900 MKIII Master Volume head
Carvin G412T cabinet
Line 6 DL-4
Boss BF-3
Boss CS-3
Boss NS-2
Boss OD-20
Boss PH-2
Ibanez TS-7 (being modded soon!)
#2
Learn as much as possible. Ive played (guitar) for 5 years self taught, and am just started to learn as much as possible. And its facinating to me. Learn as much as possible, and learn to play piano. It makes things easier, and it will make you a better musician.
Not Enough AssHatery
#3
Yeah, I've really been wanting to learn piano for quite a while. I've been trying to immerse myself in as many musical instruments as possible as of late, just so I can expand my musical knowledge and skill.
2005 Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Marshall JCM900 MKIII Master Volume head
Carvin G412T cabinet
Line 6 DL-4
Boss BF-3
Boss CS-3
Boss NS-2
Boss OD-20
Boss PH-2
Ibanez TS-7 (being modded soon!)
#4
i didn't find that it was incredibly helpful in making my guitar playing better, but i did find that i had a better understanding as to why i was palying it. like sweetfracture said, learn piano. that will make you a better musician. at any rate, theory won't hurt and it will help with harmonizing
#5
I'm self taught with minimal theory and what I do know helps so much trust me. Key changes , harmonizing , creating riffs yes it all does pay off in the end... I like to put it in this form

learn ALL the rules , then BREAK em.
#6
You don't throw it out the window; that would be ridiculous. I will use an analogy.

Johann Santana is the best pitcher in the league right now. He throws the ball right and does good things for the Twins. But when he pitches, he is not thinking "bring arm back, lift leg, follow through." He's just pitched so many times that it just comes naturally.
#7
I think it depends on the person. Right now I'm learning some theory and it has helped a bit. It hasn't helped me compose anything new but if there's say, a certain sound or mood I want to have in a song then i'll use some theory to figure out what I need to do. Of course, I also just doodle around and hope I hit something that sounds great. Actually, some of my best riffs come from just doodling around. This probably isn't much help since I defended both sides so I'll just say learn the theory.
GMO INC.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You don't throw it out the window; that would be ridiculous. I will use an analogy.

Johann Santana is the best pitcher in the league right now. He throws the ball right and does good things for the Twins. But when he pitches, he is not thinking "bring arm back, lift leg, follow through." He's just pitched so many times that it just comes naturally.

I love analogies