#1
now in theory class we are doing minor and major 2nds. on this worksheet i have it says "write a diatonic half step above and below the following notes. and the note is an #A os would the answer be a D and a xB? im confused
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Quote by timsafatass
Dude, you cant play it because your right handed, you can only play it on a left handed guitar
Last edited by justshreddin16 at Sep 13, 2006,
#2
it would be B natural(above) and G double sharp(below)
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#3
Gx - A# - B.

The Gx to A# is diatonic from the A# major scale (vii° - I) and the A# to B is diatonic from the F# major scale (iii - IV).
Last edited by Johnljones7443 at Sep 13, 2006,
#4
thank you
and thats what i put i just wrote it wrong on here cuz i was looking at the next one
lol, thanks a bunch though, im sure ill be on here alot this year asking questions.
Quote by Which_Guitar
i've started to learn the HALO theme song (the hard one) to kill time!


Quote by timsafatass
Dude, you cant play it because your right handed, you can only play it on a left handed guitar
#5
Quote by Johnljones7443
Gx - A# - B.

The Gx to A# is diatonic from the A# major scale (vii° - I) and the A# to B is diatonic from the F# major scale (iii - IV).

Damn that confused me. Maybe it's just because I'm not sure on what a diatonic is. . . Also can someone refresh me on the times you need to use a double sharp or a double flat?
#6
^A diatonic half step is a half step that occurs in a diatonic scale. You should know that in general, you don't write diatonic scales with one note name occuring more than once. You use enharmonic spellings.

So, any half step that occurs in a diatonic scale is always going to be written with two different note names, which is where it differs from a chromatic half step where it's simply be written as A - A# or C - C#, relative to the same note.

You use x and bb in a situation where that particular note name must function as a particular degree of a scale, or chord.

Take a °7 chord: 1 - b3 - b5 - bb7.

That bb7 is the same note as the major 6th... but spelling it 1 - b3 - b5 - 6 would be wrong because the 6 implies that the note is functioning as some kind of 6th, when we know it isn't - it's functioning as a 7th, a diminished 7th. So we write it bb7 to emphasize that it is functioning as some kind of 7th within that chord and relative to the other tones.

Y'understand?
#8
^Well no, 'the diatonic scale' isn't the major scale - a diatonic scale is any scale comprising of seven notes seperated by five whole steps and two half steps.

In diatonic theory, it's a general rule that you don't spell two different intervals with the same note name... which is where bb and x come in and the function of each note is important.

If you want more elaboration, just ask.