#1
Whats the difference between the tritone and the augumented/diminished 5th?..
#2
nothing but name really
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#3
domronr just posted an article in the columns about it. its amazing go check it out
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#4
so they are the same interval just depends on which context ala aminor/cmajor scales
#5
yah basically
Quote by Freepower

B) Think. This may be hard if you havent done it before, so start slow and with a metronome.

Quote by Punk Poser
What's in my wallet:
Broken Dreams, crushed oppurtinitues, and an old condom.

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well, we are pricks, but were arrogant, not ignorant.
#6
i dont understand in what context the interval name is used-the tritone article didnt explain this. Is it based on the triads within a certain key eg B diminished in the key of C?..
#7
Quote by K10P
Whats the difference between the tritone and the augumented/diminished 5th?..


A tritone is the same as an augmented 4th, which is enharmonic to a diminished 5th. Most of the time you'll see it to specifically denote half an octave, as it's an interval that spans three whole steps.

Quote by K10P
i dont understand in what context the interval name is used-the tritone article didnt explain this. Is it based on the triads within a certain key eg B diminished in the key of C?..


The name tritone is the name of the interval. Just as an augmented sixth would be called a minor seventh, or a diminished sixth would be called a perfect fifth.

The tritone occurs in a lot more places than the vii° triad of a major key, though.
#8
just to expand a bit, the tritone is so called because it is a three tone interval. that makes it six half tones, which caused the church to call it the devils interval (well that combined with the dissonance it creates). this led to the medieval church banning the locrian mode because it is the only mode with a diminished fifth instead of a perfect fifth, thus somehow becoming the devils mode or something.

the tritone is also present in some other chords, such as in any dominant sevent chord. the interval between the major third and dominant/minor seventh is a tritone. which gives the chord its tension and thus gives a strong resolution in a V7-I movement.
#9
Quote by Johnljones7443
A tritone is the same as an augmented 4th, which is enharmonic to a diminished 5th. Most of the time you'll see it to specifically denote half an octave, as it's an interval that spans three whole steps.


The name tritone is the name of the interval. Just as an augmented sixth would be called a minor seventh, or a diminished sixth would be called a perfect fifth.

The tritone occurs in a lot more places than the vii° triad of a major key, though.



thanks JPJ-apologies for dissing you previously-you know your shiet