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#1
Everyone thinks lead is harder, but has anyone thought bout a great rhythm guitarist, all the chords they must know, i think lead and rhythm are equally difficult, one knows chords the other knows scales, anyone agree?
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#4
rhthyems harder if your a lead guitarist, and lead guitars hard if your a rhthyem, but if one learns both then they are set
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#5
true but im sure rhythm guitarists know some scales and can base chords on them, but a rhythm guitarists focus on chords and lead guitarists focus on scales, so it seems that they are equal in difficulty
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#6
i play rhythm in a band but whenever im practicing im always playing the lead parts. i know the lead and rhythm for a lot of songs but my other guitarist is just more suited for lead. I think they are almost equally hard to play.
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#7
James Hetfeild,Dusty from Between the Buried and Me are great at keeping time.


Zacky V. sucks at rhythm he only plays half of the real power chords that are played on the CD
#8
Someone, I don't know who the hell who, said that you had to be a good rythem guitarist before you become a great lead guitarist.
#9
Are you on crack???

rthym harder than lead
wtf:

I know way more chords than my rthym guitarist does and that probably goes for most bands. Just becuase i prefer to riff and add harmonize with the vocals don't mean i don't know my chords.
#10
uh no these are all falacies. both lead and rhythm players should know chords AND scales; they're fundamental things all guitarists should obviously know. however what makes a good rhythm player is how he creates uh let me see RHYTHM!! for the lead player to follow which is pretty ironic haha. the lead player usually comes up with melodies, solos, passages, etc to play over these. bottomline is: greatness comes from how the two kinds or players compliment and interact with each other, in my opinion anyways...
#11
Lost Hippie,i never said it was harder,and that means ur a rhythm guitarist u just dont play it in your band
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#12
Lead and Rhythm are just labels people try to place on music. Both are equal in every which way you just dont know it!!!
#13
i just had to address this because i always hear people putting rhythm guitarists down because they don't solo, and people don't realize some chords are just played in single notes for lead, and that makes the lead guitarist better, it doesn't make sense
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Last edited by IbanezxXx at Sep 14, 2006,
#14
in the modern world rythm playing is the most important, lead playing only lasts for like 30 seconds of a song at most in the modern world, unless its guitar instrumental type stuff
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#15
Quote by Guitar Skater
James Hetfeild,Dusty from Between the Buried and Me are great at keeping time.


Zacky V. sucks at rhythm he only plays half of the real power chords that are played on the CD


well zacky v is in a great band, making a ****load of money, partying most of the time, getting laid, making music and performing live, in front of thousands of people. everyday

he must be doing something right then dont u think?
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#16
/\ Correction: In modern more mainstream type stuff rhythm is usually more important. There's still bands that have some nice lead parts and solos. Also, a lot of the rhythm in nu metal type stuff is mostly powerchords. Just because it's more important to the song doesn't mean it's harder.

EDIT: That's to ScottishAngus
#18
that depends on the band, in alot of them that is true, but the rhythm guitarist can do chords involving more strings
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#20
same here
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#21
i love playing both, each provide some new challenge for me
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#22
They're equally difficult but unless your in a jazz/shred band, rythmn is ALOT more important (a half decent solo over a killer riff is better than a killer solo over a lousy boring riff)
#23
^ and yet so many bands get away with it
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#25
The simple fact of the matter is that as with most instruments, the challenge is dependant on the instrument and the way you play it. Quite frankly, I think that playing rhythm is a little harder even though I'm primarily a lead guitarist.Think about it - as a lead guitarist, you can screw up play out of tempo, and numerous other things and it can still sound good. When playing rhythm, bass, or keyboards, though, everything has to be generally perfect or it can throw the whole song off. However, you must also take into consideration the laughably basic rhythms used by excellent lead guitarists (John Petrucci, for example). Then you can have jazz rhythms that a lead guitarist like Steve Vai would snap trying to play. It's all dependant on what you're used to playing and what you do the most. People say bass guitar is easier, but once you actually immerse yourself, bass can be incredibly challenging. Especially if you want to play it WELL. Look at Les Claypool, Victor Wooten, and Billy Sheehan amongst others. It just all depends.
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#26
I don't really think that either would be harder. It all depends on your skill as a musician.
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#27
I must say that this is a dumb thread, because a great guitar player doesn't just stick to one. Hell, ANY guitar player shouldn't stick to one. Me and my guitarist trade off all the time, because you can't have one guy soloing all the time and one guy playing rhythm, that structures your sound too much, you can't have true consistency, that's impossible and stupid, really. Sure bands have done that, but a lot of their songs have the same feel as well.
#28
However, you must also take into consideration the laughably basic rhythms used by excellent lead guitarists (John Petrucci, for example). Then you can have jazz rhythms that a lead guitarist like Steve Vai would snap trying to play.


Just because they don't choose to play "complex" rhythm parts doesn't mean they can't.

The whole discussion is bloody stupid.
#29
Quote by Erc
Just because they don't choose to play "complex" rhythm parts doesn't mean they can't.

The whole discussion is bloody stupid.


I didn't say that they couldn't, Captain Numbnuts. I said there are rhythm guitarists that are better than Steve Vai is a lead by far.
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#30
Quote by IbanezxXx
Everyone thinks lead is harder, but has anyone thought bout a great rhythm guitarist, all the chords they must know, i think lead and rhythm are equally difficult, one knows chords the other knows scales, anyone agree?


I've played lead and rhythm as well as bass (on the sixstring though) and I would have to say it depends on what you know and use. Playing lead I have the pents, scales, patterns, etc, as well as chords. As rhythm player I have triads, inversions, 7ths, minors, etc, as well as chords. As bass well...

Most of the music are chord based so you should learn your chords inside out. What makes chords? There's stuff in it. For a good start look at the caged system.

Now to me, lead and rhythm are equal because it's the same stuff. It's how you use it that makes it lead or rhythm.

After reading someone's post I remembered that we used to have lead and rhythm guitars in the band. That's in the 60s and the 70s that I played. Nowadays we're using first guitar and second guitar as they both play lead and rhythm.
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#31
Quote by OldRocker
I've played lead and rhythm as well as bass (on the sixstring though) and I would have to say it depends on what you know and use. Playing lead I have the pents, scales, patterns, etc, as well as chords. As rhythm player I have triads, inversions, 7ths, minors, etc, as well as chords. As bass well...

Most of the music are chord based so you should learn your chords inside out. What makes chords? There's stuff in it. For a good start look at the caged system.

Now to me, lead and rhythm are equal because it's the same stuff. It's how you use it that makes it lead or rhythm.

After reading someone's post I remembered that we used to have lead and rhythm guitars in the band. That's in the 60s and the 70s that I played. Nowadays we're using first guitar and second guitar as they both play lead and rhythm.


Stop being so God damn smart, you crotchety old bastard.
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#32
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#33
Look at jazz players that do both. At the same time! Thats good guitar playin'.
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#35
They're equally hard in my opinion. Just look at any good death metal tab. Those rythms can sometimes look like a solo played in power chords and you have to be exactly accurate with timing or it sounds like ****.
#36
Like some guys said, it equally harder, that depends of the musical arrangement and not if is a solo lick of rythym riff. And of course, the lead guitarist have to learn to play rythym either. ie: Kirk Hammett.
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#37
um, they're equal. both can be difficult and complicated and both can be really easy and simple. argument over.
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#38
Quote by Sean-Man
rhthyems harder if your a lead guitarist, and lead guitars hard if your a rhthyem, but if one learns both then they are set

that's a load of crap

there's a word called "practice" out there, look it up.
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