#2
nah just count. like if you want to find a major chord, just use root, 3, 5. or minor root b3, 5.

there are tons more
Quote by Mad Marius
No, I saw them on that documentary, Jurassic Park. They walked around and ate electric fences and people.
#3
thoretically u only need to know the way the major and minor scales are made, like wot intervals are needed. from here u can pretty much construct any chord
#5
Its not that complicated really, you do not have to know for example the interval between notes 2 and 5 in Am7#13. You could work them out easily, but basically everyone only knows the intervals from the root. You basically have the answer in the chord itself. So, if we were to take Am7#13, we know that A is the root, that from that is a minor 3rd and minor 7th(check chord theory) and from that its just a #13.
Quote by Robbie n strat
In the changing rooms we'd all jump around so our dicks and balls bounced all over the place, which we found hilarious.



Little children should be felt, not heard.
#6
Quote by fade2dust
thoretically u only need to know the way the major and minor scales are made, like wot intervals are needed. from here u can pretty much construct any chord

so i need to know the notes in the major scale in every key?
#7
Quote by Don't Read This
so i need to know the notes in the major scale in every key?

Ehh, sort of, but not really.

In every major scale, the chords follow a certain pattern:

Major
minor
minor
major
major
minor
diminished

So that means that the first chord in the scale will be major, the second one minor, etc..

So in C major, the chords are C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, and B diminished. Now, let's say you want to know the chord F major, but you don't know the notes.

1) You can take the F major scale:

F G A Bb C D E

take the 1st 3rd and 5th degrees of it (1 3 5 is the major chord formula)

F A C

and there is your F major triad, made up of the notes F A and C.

Now, for this method, you would need to know the notes in every key, depending on the chord you want, but you don't need to memorize every scale, thanks to the handy-dandy circle of fifths:

--------------------------------------------------------------

The Circle of Fifths

This is a device used to determine the notes of each key in the major scale. Here is a lovely picture of it. Take it, hold it, and love it.



Now, as you can see, C is up at the top and is in the middle. That is because it has no sharps or flats. As you move clockwise, you will move into the sharp keys. As you move left, you will run through the flat keys. By sharp and flat keys, I mean that is how you would write the scales.

C major: C D E F G A B
G major: G A B C D E F#
D major: D E F# G A B C
A major: A B C# D E F# G#
E major: E F# G# A B C# D#
B major: B C# D# E F# G# A#
F# major: F# G# A# B C# D# E#
C# major: C# D# E# F# G# A# B#

I've bolded every new sharp written in each key, progressing clockwise through the circle of fifihs. As you can see, the sharps are added in this order:

F C G D A E B

This can be remembered with the acronym:

Father
Charles
Goes
Down
And
Ends
Battle


This is where the sharp keys end.

Now for the flat keys, going counter-clockwise.

F major: F G A Bb C D E
Bb major: Bb C D Eb F G A
Eb major: Eb F G A Bb C D Eb
Ab major: Ab Bb C Db Eb F G
Db major: Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C
Gb major: Gb Ab Bb Cb Db Eb Fb
Cb major: Cb Db Eb Fb Gb Ab Bb

I've bolded the new flats this time. the order is reverse of the order that you add sharps, B E A D G C F. Which can be remembered with the acronym:

Battle
Ends
And
Down
Goes
Charles'
Father


I know this is hard to take in at first, but give it time and don't rush into it. It'll come. It's like a language. The more you use it, the easier it'll come eventually.

------------------------------------------------------

Now, for the second method to finding a chord.

Okay, let's use the F major chord again. We know that chords are built off of thirds (and if you don't, this is a good time to tell you that chords are built off of thirds ) so we can take the C major scale (since we know that F major is part of the C major scale thanks to our major scale chord "pattern") and stack thirds on top of F (basically, we take every other note starting from F to get our F major chord).

C D E F G A B C D E F

There! We have F A C again, which is our F major chord.

That help any?

#8
^Hey Brando... wanna post that Co5 bit for me in MT on PB? I'm going to archive that thread soon (if Andy gets around to making that new forum ).. so that will be a nice addition.

/off topic post