#1
I'm posting to know what the noticeable difference is between string gauges is like. You see, I've been playing for a bit now, a few years, and have never properly changed a string, I've unstrung it then restrung with the same one to see if I knew how to, but never a new string. I always took it to my local shop for that and thus never nknew what thickness they were.

I know they get thicker like 0.09 is thinner than 0.11 but does a change in string gauge affect the sound they make?

I'm aware that different gauges have different bending abilities and sustain but is this really noticeable? And is there a way of measuring them?

Add everything relevant to this because I'm sure it'll help many other people who are starting to restring for the first time.
#2
The tone is stronger in thicker guages. I'm not sure about the measuring the sustain and bending though.

A lot of guitars are fit with 9s or 10s when you buy the guitars, so maybe something in that area would be good.
#3
The tone changes slightly, You may not even notice the sound change. But thicker strings are ALOT harder to bend, comparing say a 9 and 12,13 gauge string.
#4
There is a slight tone change but the most noticable difference is how they play. I hate using anything .09 and smaller cause my fingers slip on them and they feel loose, especially on my guitar since I tune a half step down. But, that's just me. I didn't find strings I liked until I tried a few different brands, types and gauges until I decided on D'Addario .10's.
#5
lower tunings often used in genres like metal are better suited with heavier gauged strings
#6
Also one more question: when asking for D'addario 0.10 gauge strings. How would i pronounce D'addario and would I say nought point ten or just point ten or what? It's a bit of a stupid question bur I don't wanna sound like a moron.
#7
When I switches from 0.009 to 0.010 I noticed a huge difference in the sound my guitar had. Don't forget that when you switch string gauge your guitar will probably need the intonation adjusted and maybe also a trussrod adjustment. And just ask for "D'addario 10s"
Washburn X50 PROFE
Dean Custom 450
Morley PWA Pro Series Wah
Big Muff Rams head
Zoom G2
Ibanez Phase Tone
Randall RG75 G3

Tales of Ale: http://www.talesofale.com
#8
A lot of people say the tone difference isn't noticeable, but when I siwtched from 9s to 10s last year, a drummer who I jam with who doesn't play guitar mentioned that my guitar sounded different without knowing sh*t about strings/tone/anything, so there you go. I play with 13s now and the tone from them is f*cking good.

Remember if you upgrade your strings to check the general setup and intonation of your guitar.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#9
This is a quick explanation of how magnetic pickups work:

A pickup is a magnet (or several pole pieces) wrapped in several hundred winds of wire. This creates an electromagnet. When a ferrous body vibrates through a magnetic field, such as a steel string, it causes the magnet to create an electrical signal. Now this is where the difference in string guage comes in - the larger the body vibrating through the field, the more powerful the electrical signal created. The more powerful signal from the pickups means a more powerful signal running to the amp. This creates more volume and "more tone" from thicker strings. Of course, if you're just changing by one guage, the effects will be negligible; going several guages, however, should create a noticable difference. Also, thicker strings will create a signal that loses less integrity as it travels along a cord, so longer cords will suck your tone less with thicker strings.
Hi, I'm Peter
#10
Quote by mark-2007
Also one more question: when asking for D'addario 0.10 gauge strings. How would i pronounce D'addario and would I say nought point ten or just point ten or what? It's a bit of a stupid question bur I don't wanna sound like a moron.

Wikipedia:
"The D'Addario (phonetically pronounced Da-Dairy-O) family of string-makers originated in the small Italian town of Salle in the province of Pescara."

I usually say "D'Addario O elevens," as in the letter O. Which is weird now that I think about it because I always make a point to differentiate between 0 and O. When reading numbers to people.
#11
Quote by mark-2007
Also one more question: when asking for D'addario 0.10 gauge strings. How would i pronounce D'addario and would I say nought point ten or just point ten or what? It's a bit of a stupid question bur I don't wanna sound like a moron.



i pronouce it "dee add ahh ree ohh"
and if i wanted gauge .009s then i would just say "nines" or .010s id just say "tens" they know what i mean, plus its easier.
Been away, am back
#12
I think .009s are easier to play if you don't tune down much but heavier strings definitely give you a thicker tone. They make hybrid sets to where the G,B and, E strings are smaller Than the E,A and, D. I'm not sure if D'Addario makes a hybrid set.