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#1
So I want to get an electric guitar, but I've heard conflicting arguements as to whether or not it's best to start right away with an electric, or to start off with an acoustic first.

Which option should I go with? And what brands and price ranges should I consider?
#2
You could always get an electric and use heavy gauge strings with high action.
#3
depends on what your going to start to play......if you wanna start to play green day and and Nirvana and other beginner music that requires distortion get a guitar and amp.....but if you really want to get the rhythm get an acoustic
#4
Not surprisingly, I have no idea what you just recommended me. Heavy gauge strings? high action?
#5
hmm i'd say acoustic because

-builds finger strength better
-easier to pick up and play or transport (no cords or amps) which means picking it up to practice or jam with a friend will be less of a hassle
-better value. say you want to spend $400, if you go acoustic you'll get a guitar that will last you many years. if you buy an electric and an amp, both will probably be cheap and you'll outgrow them quickly (by outgrow, i mean that their poor quality will hinder your ability to become better on the instrument)
"You are amazed that it is so easy to infect men with the war fever, and you surmise that man has in him an active instinct for hatred and destruction... I entirely agree with you."

--Sigmund Freud in a letter to Albert Einstein

#6
Quote by Exershio
You could always get an electric and use heavy gauge strings with high action.

what he means by this is that to achieve the same fingerstrength-building as on an acoustic, you could buy heavier strings and have your guitar adjusted to make it harder to play. but in my opinion, a guitar that is hard to play won't help you as much as one that's easy to play because you'll be less frustrated with the easy to play one and PLAY IT MORE. that said, acoustics are generally harder to play (not impossible), and i'm sure there are plenty of people who started out on electric and turned out fine, but if you start on acoustic, you won't have a learning curve if you have to go from electric to acoustic, and plus you'll absolutely fly on an electric when you do eventually buy one. of course, if you can't see yourself seriously playing acoustic in a million years, go for electric.
"You are amazed that it is so easy to infect men with the war fever, and you surmise that man has in him an active instinct for hatred and destruction... I entirely agree with you."

--Sigmund Freud in a letter to Albert Einstein

#7
Get a guitar that suits the type of music you like most.

That said, you can learn to play on either.

Accoustic is a little harder to fret and bend cleanly, but you get used to it. Plus, you don't have to worry about an Amp. And the sound is sweet.

Electric is best for rock / jazz / metal / pop. You can explore a wider range of sounds with it.
#10
I say just go with what will best suit the style of music you want to play. You'll have no problem going from one to the other after you get well-situated with your instrument of choice.

Also, as long as you get a decent quality beginner instrument (I personally reccomend Squire for electric or accoustic), your learning progress will not be hampered even the slightest. The only the thing that will be affected is the quality of your sound, and that's nothing to worry about at this point.
#11
Quote by silvadolla
i'd say get an electric guitar, it'll keep you interested.

that's not necessarily true. what if he's more into acoustic music? they both have their advantages and disadvantages when it comes to learning to play. just get the one you're more interested in.
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#12
electric is easier id recommend that, an acoustic will just frustrate you and you might quit then after a while get the acoustic to build finger strength.
ibanez rocks
#13
Well, like I said in my original post, I want to play electric, but some people say that it's better to start out with an acoustic before going to an electric.
#15
Id say acoustic to start with mate. It ll bring up caloses and finger strength gradually, and u wont be tempted to go right into shred based playing and give ur self one hell of a muscle cramp
#16
Quote by MuzzleFlash
Well, like I said in my original post, I want to play electric, but some people say that it's better to start out with an acoustic before going to an electric.

Go electric if you want it. You'll build finger strength sooner or later.
Dickless.
#17
Quote by gallagher2006
Id say acoustic to start with mate. It ll bring up caloses and finger strength gradually, and u wont be tempted to go right into shred based playing and give ur self one hell of a muscle cramp


^Yeah, that's right... tell someone who has no interest in playing the acoustic guitar.. to play the acoustic guitar? Reeeeal smart.

Yeah - playing the electric might be physically easier than playing the acoustic guitar - but he wants to play music that requires an electric guitar, why the hell would you tell him to buy an acoustic guitar?

He won't be able to play most of the music he wants to on an acoustic guitar - he won't be able to reach the frets, play the bends, play with distortion - he's a beginner or god sakes, he's going to have trouble learning on an electric, let alone on an acoustic.

If he starts out on an acoustic, a month down the line he'll get discouraged because 1) he can't play along to his favourite songs and 2) he won't be able to execute the basic techniques required to jam along to his favourite songs and ergo he's more than likely to give it up, all because because someone on a forum wanted to raise his post count by posting a complete and utter loads of bollocks.

Threadstarter.. you want to start on electric? Start on electric.. don't listen to anyone who says 'Oh start on an acoustic, you'll build finger strength up quicker' because they don't know what they're talking about.
#18
Quote by Dan Steinman
... but in my opinion, a guitar that is hard to play won't help you as much as one that's easy to play because you'll be less frustrated with the easy to play one and PLAY IT MORE. ... but if you start on acoustic, you won't have a learning curve if you have to go from electric to acoustic, and plus you'll absolutely fly on an electric when you do eventually buy one. of course, if you can't see yourself seriously playing acoustic in a million years, go for electric.


+1.... from someone who has been *teaching* guitar longer than most of you have been alive.

Acoustic.... but a decent one.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Quote by Johnljones7443


Threadstarter.. you want to start on electric? Start on electric.. don't listen to anyone who says 'Oh start on an acoustic, you'll build finger strength up quicker' because they don't know what they're talking about.



and you do?
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#20
Quote by axemanchris
+1.... from someone who has been *teaching* guitar longer than most of you have been alive.

Acoustic.... but a decent one.

Chris


Wait, are you agreeing or disagreeing with him?
#21
Agreeing... a decent acoustic guitar won't be that difficult to play. I'm not talking a Martin or a Taylor... Poster should get a half-way decent used Yamaha or something for a couple hundred. It will play nice and sound nice.

With acoustic - and I often go one step further and suggest a classical guitar to start - the strings are a little further apart (meaning the pads of your fingers will be less likely to sink down and block the strings below - a VERY common source of frustration for beginning guitarists), the frets a bit wider (increasing reach dexterity), and requires more strength development to play. To go from there to an electric will be such an easy step - like jumping up and down on the moon instead of on earth. Going from electric to acoustic, though, would be like trying to navigate stairs with ski boots on. "Bloody hell... why is this so hard? I do it all the time!!" hahaha...

I often suggest classical because the strings are just that much further apart, and the frets just that much wider again.... and the nylon strings don't cut into your finger tips quite so much as the steel strings.

Learning on a cheap (ie. poor, difficult to play) acoustic is like trying to learn to swim with a snowmobile suit on.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
But it wouldn't be very appropriate if I tried to learn acoustic songs with a classical, would it?
#23
Quote by MuzzleFlash
But it wouldn't be very appropriate if I tried to learn acoustic songs with a classical, would it?

no.

what kind of music made you want to learn guitar in the first place? tell us that and we can probably give you a better suggestion as to what kind of guitar you should get first.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#24
When I was about to buy a guitar I aske the same question to a friend who was in a band and older. I also asked on a few different band forums and most people told me start on Acoustic because you'll understand music theory and build more finger strength. They also said that it's easier to transport and such.

They also said acoustic is tougher because it's harder to change a screw up into something cool. People I talked to also said if I learned acoustic and got good at it, that I would enjoy electric alot too.

My buddy said something that has stuck with me forever though

And I quote:

"If your worried about which one is harder, don't even start playing because they are both tough."

It also matter how much money is available for you to spend. If you ahve enough to buy an electric and a good practice amp then buy it if you want it.

It all comes down to how you want to play and WHAT YOU WANT TO PLAY.

Me myself chose acoustic.
#25
So then while a classical guitar might be good for a pure beginner, playing songs that don't belong to that instrument defeats the purpose of having a classical, even if it is used just as a starting point, right?

As for what kind of music, rock/metal and related genres. So, electric guitar obviously. But the question is whether or not I should start off with an acoustic or electric. I can understand the reasons for learning to play an acoustic first, and it seems like the best thing to do. However, I much prefer electric guitar songs over acoustic guitar songs. So while getting an electric guitar might provide me with immediate gratification, working my way up to an electric might be easier for me in the future.

That's the conclusion I've come up with based on what I've read. And if my conclusion is correct, then it's more of a personal decision, which would make it a very difficult one.

#26
Quote by AiCPearlJam

It all comes down to how you want to play and WHAT YOU WANT TO PLAY.


Ya, I was hoping it wouldn't come down to a personal decision. Those are the hardest to make IMO.
#27
Then by all means get an electric. Make sure you have enough money for all the accessories and stuff too.

See I like early 90's Alt/Grunge/Rock and blues so I lvoe Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains unplugged stuff., So I got an acosutic. I think you should get an electric if you enjoy it more. Better learn an electric then buy an acoustic and never learn at all right?
#28
well here's the issue. learning to play guitar isn't easy at all. you will get frustrated.... BUT if you're at least working towards learning songs you actually like, chances are slimmer that you'll give up on the instrument.

Don't worry about which one is tougher and which one builds finger strength etc.

If you're buying your very first guitar, your biggest concern should be staying interested long enough to get over that initial hump of knowing absolutely nothing.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#29
I went through this exact question a few years ago when I thought it'd be really cool to learn how to play a musical instrument. And I thought that an acoustic guitar was the best way to go because it's just one thing, and it'd be easy to pick up and play anywhere around the house. I even got one that was acoustic/electric, which basically meant there was a mic and pre-amp in the acoustic body - not that you can get any convincing electric guitar sounds out of it. The guitar I bought was a Takamine EG240RS - so not a bad guitar at all.

And for 4 years, it sat in the corner collecting dust.

Then about a year ago I got the game Guitar Hero, and really enjoyed playing the game. It made me realize that what's important is being able to play the songs that I enjoy, not some folk song or just the acoustic intro to Fade to Black. The most important thing about learning the guitar is to be motivated to play. For me, I grew up with 80's and 90's rock/metal, so being able to play those songs really motivates me. And that means a electrical guitar, not acoustic.

So regardless of the pros and cons of electric versus acoustic, the most important factor (IMO) is how well each one matches the type of music you hope to learn and play.
Ibanez RG2570E, Epiphone VJH-PP, Celestion V30 Lopo Line 1x12, EHX Metal Muff, Yamaha Magicstomp MKII, Tascam CD-GT1 MKII
#30
That is an important consideration. Absolutely. I believe in getting a foundation of basic chords and skills that you can apply to songs that you like. Surely not every song a person wants to learn are just wanking on power chords through some max-gain channel. If it is, all they'll learn with their electric guitar is a bunch of power chords, and they come out after two years not really knowing anything.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#31
I don't know why, axemanchris, but I have a hard time figuring out the point that you're trying to make in each of your posts.

Anyways, going back to your post at the top of this page, you recommended starting with an classical acoustic guitar as the easiest way to learn the basics and transition to an electric. But I know that classical guitars are somewhat different than acoustic-acoustics and electrics, so is the difference small enough to allow skills to transfer from classical to other types of guitars?
#33
The skills (not necessarily the repertoire) you learn on a classical guitar can generally be applied to any guitar.

Classical guitar:
1. Nylon strings = not so hard on the fingertips.
2. Frets wider - develops greater reach dexterity
3. Strings farther apart - Remember learning that first C chord and having the pad of your first finger wanting to slouch down and accidentally mute the first string? How about learning F and the pad of the second finger wanting to droop down and cut off the second string you were trying to hard to barre? With more space between the strings (not between the strings and the fretboard), there is a little more "forgiveness room" so that your pads of your fingers are less likely to get in the way of the strings below the ones you are fingering.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#34
most people start on accoustic but you don't have to, its all a matter of taste - you'll probably fiind an electric guitar easier to play but it can be annoying when you have to plug in your amp and leads etc. You will find an accoustic harder on your fingers and using an electric guitar u should still build up finger strength. the choice is still down to you though. whatever you pick get a good one take someone with you that knows what to look for cos' if u get bad one its torture. i've got a fender accoustic and a takamine - the takamine is best but still rough on the fingers. my electrics are levinson blade and an ibanez jem the jem is my bestest...
#35
Okay.

So if I were to get an electric guitar, what what you recommened for a beginner?
#36
Get whatever guitar fits the type of music you wanna play...like if you wanna play acoustic songs get an acoustic guitar or the other way around.

You want a beginner electric? What's your price range?
#37
Well, I'm not familiar with the price ranges for electric guitars. What would you recommend for a decent, but unexpensive one?
#38
Quote by MuzzleFlash
Well, I'm not familiar with the price ranges for electric guitars. What would you recommend for a decent, but unexpensive one?


ibanez rg series guitars are reasonable
#40
I recommend a Les Paul.

Seriously, I think a Les Paul will get you started and it is a fairly versatile guitar to get a variety of tones out of. I see everyone from jazz to metal players using one.

You can get a decent inexpensive LP starting at $150 to $200 from a variety of brands. I play rock/metal, and sometimes I wonder if I would be better off with an SG, Ibanez, ESP, or some other more rock/metal focused guitar. But when it comes down to it, if Kirk Hammett can get his tones through a Les Paul, well heck, that's good enough for me to continue using mine.
Ibanez RG2570E, Epiphone VJH-PP, Celestion V30 Lopo Line 1x12, EHX Metal Muff, Yamaha Magicstomp MKII, Tascam CD-GT1 MKII
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