#1
This is a pretty newbie question, but I've been using the stock strings on my Ibanez GSR200FM for as long as I've had it, which is about 4 months. I have no clue what gauge the strings on it are, either.

If I changed to Ernie Ball Power Slinkys (55, 75, 90, 110) would I have to readjust the nut, action, or intonation?

I want thicker strings because I do drop C alot, and they get really really floppy.

Is there any way to measure my current set, or should I just bite the bullet and get thicker strings and deal with whatever I have to set up?
#4
probably a set up with the new strings would be a good idea, if you plan to usually play in drop C you could even have your tech set it up specifically for that tuning. ask a tech, you might have to get the nut reshaped, you might not. and i imagine an experienced bassist could probably guess what guage strings you have, btw.
"You are amazed that it is so easy to infect men with the war fever, and you surmise that man has in him an active instinct for hatred and destruction... I entirely agree with you."

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#5
Power slinky's, a bit of nut filing (VERY easy, the guitar techs at the stores even recommend you do it yourself to save a few bucks), and obviously bridge adjusting (which should be done after every string change, regardless wether you change the guage. just remember to work with intonation/action once youre in tune, it should be: Restring, loosen strings, tune up, play a bit, tune again, readjust action to your liking, tune again, adjust intonation, retune just to be safe )
#6
Quote by Niff
If I changed to Ernie Ball Power Slinkys (55, 75, 90, 110) would I have to readjust the nut, action, or intonation?

I want thicker strings because I do drop C alot, and they get really really floppy.

Is there any way to measure my current set, or should I just bite the bullet and get thicker strings and deal with whatever I have to set up?
Use a Micrometre (an engineers measuring device) to measure the gauge of strings on your bass, if you use heavier gauge string they will pull in the neck more so when you have taken off the old strings tighten the truss rod about a quarter of a turn this should enough to compensate for the heavier/thicker strings.
I always ascertain the gauge of the strings by the above method when I buy a Bass.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#7
Quote by John Swift
Use a Micrometre (an engineers measuring device) to measure the gauge of strings on your bass,

Is this an easy tool to get? Do they sell them at hardware stores?
#8
aaah! john's right... the truss rod completely slipped my mind.

On that note: a lot of people will say "dont mess with the rod, better safe than sorry" and a lot of people will say "you'll be fine".

best way to think is inbetween: it is fine, IF You adjust very gradually and are careful about it, and if something seems wrong, it might just be, so its not a bad idea to have a second person with you (preferably a guitarist of sorts :p
#9
Quote by kmbuchamushroom
Is this an easy tool to get? Do they sell them at hardware stores?
It is easy but expensive, check out any engineers that you may know, I have three, the one in the shot is my late Father's and about 60 yrs old it shows that the bottom E on that 1964 SG is 0.0050 (50 thou).
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G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#10
Quote by John Swift
It is easy but expensive, check out any engineers that you may know, I have three, the one in the shot is my late Father's and about 60 yrs old it shows that the bottom E on that 1964 SG is 0.0050 (50 thou).

Much appreciated, thanks!
I'll see if I can scrounge one up somewheres.