#1
Two of my bandmates and I are disagreeing on the key of a song we're in the process of writing.

I'm not going to tab out what we have because it'd take too long, but I'll give you the notes that are in the song.

A B C D E F G

Hmm... to me it appears as though this is in C Major, but those other guys I mentioned earlier claim it's in E Minor.

Based on those notes, though, it would be either in C Major or in the relative key of A Minor.

E Minor, which is relative to G Major, has the notes...

G A B C D E F#

As you can see we play an 'F', not an 'F#'.

So... maybe the scale they're referring to is different, but is still in the key of E Minor?

I'm confused, honestly, and would appreciate any input.
#2
That would be Gb7... or C. You're right.
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#4
yep its C
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#7
Don't listen to the other guys who posted quite yet. Please, provide a chord progression so I can further understand how the notes are being applied.
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#8
Yeah.... I was thinking that too. If, for instance, the chord progression really seems to resolve around an Em chord - essentially using an E phrygian structure, it could be most correctly analyzed in Em. The F naturals would essentially be accidentals occuring throughout the piece, but with the harmonic/tonal center being on E it could make it a variant of Em.

Please also specify which chords are major and which are minor. They're not all major are they?

Chris
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#9
If it's based around E, it's E Phrygian, E Minor.

If it's based around A, it's A Aeolian, A Minor.

If it's based around F, it's F Lydian, F Major.


Do you see where this is going?
#10
We have yet to evolve to the verses where there would be more of a "steady" chord progression.

Right now we have this prog-rock like intro going that starts with an A Major, then there's a walk down going A G F (the notes, not chords) E Major, followed by another walk down E D A.

This is done twice, and then we play it again except the lead guitar plays an octave higher with the walk downs, and rather than end on an E Major chord and let the lead play the next three notes alone (which is the walk down of E D A), the rhythm guitar plays A Major, G5, A Major, F Major.

Based on the walk down, the lead guitar does a trill with E and D, and then the rhythm guitar goes into a riff based around E Minor, G5, A Major, C5, and B Major.

After that, we have an ascending bridge based partially off of the G Minor scale, that we play in one octave, a higher octave, the first octave again, second octave again, same octave, a higher octave, back down, and up again.

Basically that's what we have right now. We're still just trying to work with the intro, but I'd hate to find we're going in the wrong direction.

We're music theory n00bs.
#11
Well you wouldn't find A Major or B Major in the standard E Minor scale, but nor would you find them in C Major. Basically you're not playing in a straightforward scale. Can't really hlep you much more than that, being self-taught, theory isn't really my forte.
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#12
Sorry, I'm not sure why I said "A Major" or "B Major" (I posted at about 5:30 this morning, so my mind wasn't working)...

Those should have said A5 and B5, both of which contain notes in C Major.
#13
B5 has an F# in it which is not found in C.

It sounds like you're in some sort of key revolving around A.

"Right now we have this prog-rock like intro going that starts with an A Major, then there's a walk down going A G F (the notes, not chords) E Major, followed by another walk down E D A."

That bit is totally key of A. The G and the F would be considered bVI and bVII chords, and are essentially "borrowed" from A minor. The fact that you start on A major, go to E major, and then go back V-IV-I (going back to the A) in A is the giveaway here.

"This is done twice, and then we play it again except the lead guitar plays an octave higher with the walk downs, and rather than end on an E Major chord and let the lead play the next three notes alone (which is the walk down of E D A), the rhythm guitar plays A Major, G5, A Major, F Major."

This is pretty much cut from the same cloth as above. I'm guessing from the F it goes back to A?

"Based on the walk down, the lead guitar does a trill with E and D, and then the rhythm guitar goes into a riff based around E Minor, G5, A Major, C5, and B Major."

This sounds like to shift to the key of Em, basically. The E and D notes in the trill fit, an Em, G5, C5 and B major all fit that perfectly. The B would be made major because it is the V chord in the key of Em (this is where your harmonic minor comes in). The only thing that doesn't fit neatly is the A MAJOR. A minor would make more sense from an academic perspective, but if you like it, don't change it just because it is more "academically" correct. With the A major, you have a C# in that chord, which doesn't really "get along with" the C5 chord immediately following. There is no C# in the key of Em (unless you count melodic minor, yeah....). So, either way, something is funny there. The A minor chord would use a C natural which does fit in the key of Em, and will "get along with" the C5 chord immediately following.

Chris
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
I'm just curious, and please don't consider this hijacking, but does the Gb7 scale = C Major scale?? If so, what mode of C is the Gb7 scale?

As for the threadstarter's question, it might really be Em, like your bandmates said.