#1
Basically, what does it do? When do you use it? Is it so usefull that I'm willing to pay 60 euros more to get the AD30VT instead of the AD15VT?
#4
Lets you have that "cranked amp" sound at lower volumes. Apparently.
#5
No, it's not. It's a wattage control- it lets you play with the poweramp limited to one watt, fifteen watts, or thirty watts.
#6
Well, it's a smooth throw knob, so it's not that specific. Supposedly it allows you to play with the power amp at anywhere from 0.1 watts to 30 watts. But yeah, 5kuzgib has it right. I don't notice any substantial sound difference, though. If you just leave your gain and volume controls dimed, you can use it as a master volume, essentially.
Hi, I'm Peter
#7
My AD60's isn't a smooth throw, it's got intervals at 1, 15, 30 and 60
#8
Quote by Danno13
My AD60's isn't a smooth throw, it's got intervals at 1, 15, 30 and 60

Ah, ok. Well, I'm sure your AD60's actually does something. But yeah, on the cheaper AD series amps, they're smooth throw. But you wouldn't know that unless you went slummin' with us
Hi, I'm Peter
#9
Actually, I remember now, and you're right. I was gonna buy an AD50, and the shop guy was showing me all the cool stuff about it, and he described the wattage thing as a "master-master volume knob" and let me turn it some.

And then I found some more money lying around, so I bought ten more watts. But that's not ze point.
#10
It does nothing. And the amp sounds like **** cranked anyways. So really theres no point to it.
Epiphone Goth Les Paul Studio
Ibanez SA120
Peavey Raptor EXP
Takamine Electric Acoustic
Boss CS-3
Boss DD-6
Boss TU-2
Boss MT-2 (For use with my Vox)
MXR M-108 10-Band Eq
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Peavey JSX Head
Vox AD50VT