#1
Ugh, my drummer is a freakin' moron. He wants to go into a recording studio to record a song we made in 1 day...We've been a band for 1 week. He says we need to make albums before playing shows so people have things to listen too if we suck live. Where the hell is the logic in that? Surely you practice, write songs, play gigs, then save up money to go into a recording studio when you are REALLY good, good enough to possibly get signed to a label. Not within 1 week of playing together! He's got his priorities way wrong, and he is the type that CANNOT lose an argument and can't be wrong, no matter what the subject is. Can anyone else see the idiocy in his decision to get studio time? I'm sure as hell not paying for anything...I haven't even got vocals for the song yet!
#2
Yeah, that dosn't sound like a good idea at all, I don't have a band or anything, but I would definatly record more songs until you start studio recording. But I know that typ that can't be wrong, it's so anoying. Another peice of advice is, if he sucks kick him out of the band and get a new drummer.
#3
record a demo type stuff with your computer.... see riffs and recording forum.

This way you both win (he gets some recordings and you don't have to chop off your right arm to pay for studio time)

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#4
that does sound pretty idiotic, especially because you only have one song, with no words, and nothing else, its not worth the expensive studio time. Hell, you could prolly do a decent recording that you can do at home, for much less cost, and burn that on a cd and then sell that, and actually have some spending cash,
#6
Don't call him idiotic, this is why. You want to have a demo not so people can hear you if you suck live but so that places will book you and people can listen to you anytime. Also, if someone is talking your band up and then pops in a demo and someone else can hear it then it is easier to gain new fans. You probably don't need to go into the studio for one incomplete song, but as soon as you have about 3 songs good and tight. You want to know your stuff BEFORE going into the studio so you can save money. You can also do it at home, but if you don't have the equipment then you could do the studio.
#7
yeah if you're really serious, you should make a demo, itll help you get better gigs, but yeah you should write about 4-5 songs and be able to play them backwards and forwards without screwing up, thne you can sonsider going into a studio to record a demo.
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#8
yeh maybe thts a bit early. my band didn't record anythin for a year. and you should record some stuff before ur lyk reli good so people can hear ua nd to amke them com 2 ur gig. or o u can hw people on the other side of the world ur stuff.
#9
It may be a bit too early for you to be seriously considering a demo of original material. If you can come up with a song that really rocks that quickly, I'd say keep at it until you have enough material for a short demo CD (typically 3 songs). Then, try to record those at home, using some computer software (Audacity is free) and microphones. This will give you an inexpensive demo that you can give to potential venues, and you'll also have a demo that you can give to a producer when you go into the studio.

Having you ideas already recorded gives them something to base the production on, and you can tell him what you'd like to improve, or remove, from the finished, professional product.

#10
Studio time actually doesn't cost that much, unless you're going for a high-level pro studio.. But recording one incomplete song is stupid indeed. You can record and do basic mixing for like 2-3, maybe more, songs in an hour or two as long as you are good enough and the band plays tight together... So it's not that great of a spender, and having a high quality demo definitely wins over a crappy home recording. But it sounds like you'd be spending more time practicing than actually recording in the studio if you went along with your drummers idea, so yeah :p
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#11
or you could buy your owen mulit-track recorder. they can be quite expensive but once you've bought it you can record as mcuh as you want when and wherevre you want.
If you want a cheaper one with really good quality then buy the Korg D4, (4-5 stars in U;ltimate Guitar reveiw) it's what i ahd and it does the job really well.
#12
Like some of the others have said, having a demo tape is definitely a plus, and quite necessary if you wish to gig out and get a fan base, but it sounds like its too soon.

Wait until you get at least a thirty minute set together. Then record three or four songs for an EP. Make sure you can play the songs competently as a group as well.

Once you are ready for those two things, its all downhill after that. You'll be able to get gigs with a demo tape and possibly make some money by selling it as well. Maybe even some radio exposure.
#13
I see this all the time, a band starts out practices 2 or 3 times writes a few songs and immediately wants to start recording. Doing it yourself alright go ahead spend the time and do it but don't think about going into a studio yet. Good songs usually come with time, that time wil usually get faster as your band gets more familiar with each other and a common style is built up however theres no need to rush into a studio. Most people don't know the half of what is involved in a studio, there is a lot more work and things that must be taken into consideration. You've got to for one consider that your paying per hour, so if you go in there after practicing a song a few times chances are you aren't going to be playing it perfect and you're going to pay paying to practice your part. Secondly recording it is one thing, but there is the time of the engineer to mix it, the time of an engineer to master it...etc.

Don't make this mistake, in a professional situation for a signed band usually an album is released before they start performing the songs live, but that doesn't apply to you. These professional bands have been playing for years before they even get signed and before they even release this album. Give yourself time to grow, practice write good songs, If you get really serious and have really solid well put togehter songs than in a year from now sure go into the studio and record them, but don't do it now especially if it's unfinished.
#14
Tell your drummer that this is the order things should go in:
1. Get good
2. Write songs
3. Play shows
4. Get a following because of the shows
5. Record album
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#15
in my experiance, drummers get really hyped up about **** really fast. my drummer with a 2 week period we had had 2 practices and he already wanted to play a show, i was like 12 and i was like no... you have to keep drummers in line theyre kinda like a dog when someone comes to the door they freak out and bark.
#16
Quote by WhereArtEsteban
in my experiance, drummers get really hyped up about **** really fast. my drummer with a 2 week period we had had 2 practices and he already wanted to play a show, i was like 12 and i was like no... you have to keep drummers in line theyre kinda like a dog when someone comes to the door they freak out and bark.


why is everyone being so harsh to dummers all of a sudden
fair enough some of them can be liek that but so can guitarists etc...
the drummer in my band is probebly the most unforsightable (it looks like a word) person in the band and he doesn't really want to get anyhtign done.
#17
Quote by b0xD
Ugh, my drummer is a freakin' moron. He wants to go into a recording studio to record a song we made in 1 day...We've been a band for 1 week. He says we need to make albums before playing shows so people have things to listen too if we suck live. Where the hell is the logic in that? Surely you practice, write songs, play gigs, then save up money to go into a recording studio when you are REALLY good, good enough to possibly get signed to a label. Not within 1 week of playing together! He's got his priorities way wrong, and he is the type that CANNOT lose an argument and can't be wrong, no matter what the subject is. Can anyone else see the idiocy in his decision to get studio time? I'm sure as hell not paying for anything...I haven't even got vocals for the song yet!


I pity the fool, he sounds like hes pretty new to being in a band.
Quote by fukyu1980
LOL ! muther fuker i was gonna say that LOL!
#18
Well, I've seen plenty of bands face this problem. It's even been reason enough for a couple of bands to split!!

For now, just concentrateon writing songs, and arranging them properly. Develop your own sound. Then record a home demo to see how much time it takes you to record one song properly. You'd want to do this as Studio time costs. This'll also serve as practice for your studio recording as well. Most probably, you'll get a wake-up call on how much more you've to practice.
#19
Tell your drummer that you will...If he pays all of the studio time,this way you get experience on recording and record the song (not the album he wants lol). Otherwise,If hes not paying, tell him that its too soon to record and that you need to make the song better to record it.