#1
yeah I deffinatly need help. I'm about to get my first guitar, and I've decided on a acoustic but besides that I'm lost.
#3
$250 or less.
Led Zeppelin
Nirvana
Nickleback
Country in General
3 Doors Down
Creed
Lots of Classic Rock
idk.
#4
hmm ive not looked into a lot of low price range acoustics, but i think yamaha arer a good acoustic make. with classic rock it might be more beneficial to go with an electric, however if your minds made up look into yamaha
#5
well i think it'd be better to learn on an acoustic. but an acoustic electric. that doesnt exactly have the electric sound so whats the point?
#6
definatly to learn you have pros and cons for starting w/ an acoustic.. an electric is 'easier to play' because of the string size and tension.. but then when you pick up a acoustic you have a tougher time to adjust than the other way around...

and the point of an acoustic electric is to amplify your sound .. thats about it... but if you put a cry baby on there..then you are making some funky stuff... but its not natural hehe.
#7
Quote by Loosfur
definatly to learn you have pros and cons for starting w/ an acoustic.. an electric is 'easier to play' because of the string size and tension.. but then when you pick up a acoustic you have a tougher time to adjust than the other way around...

and the point of an acoustic electric is to amplify your sound .. thats about it... but if you put a cry baby on there..then you are making some funky stuff... but its not natural hehe.

but i picked up my acoustic and found it just as easy from day one, the onlything was larger frets.
Electric acoustics can also sound warmer and give a better tne when through an amp, mine sounds beautiful in an amp but onli a little better than average normally.
#8
ohh. okay here's a question. i'm a 14 year old girl with little hands, is there any guitar that would make it easier to play all the chords or do i just have to learn how to stretch
#9
Quote by krusinkuntriii
ohh. okay here's a question. i'm a 14 year old girl with little hands, is there any guitar that would make it easier to play all the chords or do i just have to learn how to stretch

the thing is, you're gonna need to stretch your hands some point, an ibanez or any other make of 'shred guitar' will be easier for stretches, but if your liek me it will take a long time before you properly get going.
P.S. stop before your fingers bleed, otherwise you cant play for days
#10
Quote by krusinkuntriii
ohh. okay here's a question. i'm a 14 year old girl with little hands, is there any guitar that would make it easier to play all the chords or do i just have to learn how to stretch


have a look at the Jasmine line by Takamine. these guitars seem a bit smaller to me. i've never compared the specs but i've played several and they all seemed a tad smaller and the necks might have been a little smaller as well. a friend of mine has an epiphone acoustic and the neck on it is definitely a little smaller than any of my guitars so maybe give those a look, too. both the Jasmine line and many epiphone acoustic are going to be within your price range.
#11
Quote by krusinkuntriii
ohh. okay here's a question. i'm a 14 year old girl with little hands, is there any guitar that would make it easier to play all the chords or do i just have to learn how to stretch


I'd honestly recommend that you start learning to stretch, the sooner the better. A smaller guitar will lose it's intonation as you go up the neck, you'll eventually want to play a "full sized" guitar for that reason alone. If you start on something small, it'll make it harder for you when it's time to make the transition.

Also, please don't lean on your hand size as an excuse. My 11 year old son got started on guitar by playing a full sized BASS guitar. He complained about his hands not being big enough, either, but he worked at it and got the hang of it.
#12
Quote by slatsmania
I'd honestly recommend that you start learning to stretch, the sooner the better. A smaller guitar will lose it's intonation as you go up the neck, you'll eventually want to play a "full sized" guitar for that reason alone. If you start on something small, it'll make it harder for you when it's time to make the transition.

Also, please don't lean on your hand size as an excuse. My 11 year old son got started on guitar by playing a full sized BASS guitar. He complained about his hands not being big enough, either, but he worked at it and got the hang of it.


i didn't hit on any of that in my post, but i completely agree with everything you said. the guitars i reccomended aren't parlor guitars by any means, they just seem to be slightly smaller to me. i know the epiphone my friend has is a "full sized" guitar, it's just the neck that seems a TAD smaller. i think that the neck on the guitar is actually the same neck as the Gibson/Epiphone SG model electric guitars. as i said, i'm not 100% sure whether or not the jasmine line by takamine is a "full size" guitar, but if it isn't it's probably a 15/16 or something like that.
#13
Sometimes it's better to start on a cheaper, beaten-up old crappy guitar. Then you can learn how to cope with all the problems you may face with any guitar from day 1 :-) and if it puts you off completely, then you just ain't cut out to play .
Psycho Killer,
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