#1
Ok I have a question about guitar sheet music, this gonna be pretty long and confusing. But before I go any further I want to clarify that I do understand how to read sheet music for a different instrument BUT not for guitar. That being said you can us any terms that pretain to sheet music and I will understand them.

The thing I don't understand is how so many notes that the guitar is capable of playing can fit in the five barlines on sheet music. Do the notes go many barlines above usual and many below the usual. Also this might not make sense but I'll try anyways, For example on the low E string is the 3 fret natural then the second 4 fret sharp and so on. If there is some source online for free that tell you how to read guitar sheet music could someone show me it.

Thanks to anyone who can offer some help.
#2
yes the notes go quite a few barlines under and sometimes above the normal. i think it's usually around 4 in either direction, i could be wrong though.
#3
I thought sheet music was the same for all instruments. It's just notes after all.

If you're in standard tuning, the note on the open low E is just below the third extra bottom line, and the high E string on the 22nd fret is on the sixth extra above line, if that makes any sense. The range of a guitar with 24 frets is 4 octaves if I'm not mistaken.

And low E string, 3rd fret is G, 4th fret is G#, so every fret is a semitone.
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#4
Quote by I likeallguitar
The thing I don't understand is how so many notes that the guitar is capable of playing can fit in the five barlines on sheet music.

They don't. It's as simple as that.
Many times, guitar sheet music will be written on a grand staff, so you have your treble and bass clef. Because yeah, anything from your low E string to your 3rd fret C on the A string would require ledger lines on the treble clef. Some guitar sheet music is actually written only on the bass clef, because many times a majority of the notes will just be that low.
The guitar naturally sounds an octave lower than written. A normal middle C on the guitar is an octave lower than your middle C on, say, a piano. That's just the way it is. So really, when you sight read and play guitar sheet music, it would be more accurate to play everything an octave higher. It's one of the weird things about the guitar.
Basically, most guitar sheet music requires a grand staff. Otherwise you would have a ridiculous amount of ledger lines, and it would look terrible. A good way to get started on learning to sight read guitar music would be to download this incredibly useful little game called Fretboard Warrior. It shows you a highlighted fret on the guitar, and you have to choose which note it is from a list at the bottom of a screen. It may be hard at first, but it builds up your memory of the note locations on the fretboard so fast that it's ridiculous. It personally helped me out a LOT when I was learning the notes, so hopefully it helps you as much as it helped me.
Reading music really isn't that hard. Someone with your experience in doing so should know this. It's reading the music and finding the notes on the guitar that's the tough part. I have problems with it too. Just start slow, learn your notes, then maybe try sight reading and playing a few simple C major/A minor pieces to build your skills. Everyone starts slow, but once you get good at it it becomes easier and easier to learn. Practice hard, and good luck!
#5
the lowest note you would normally notate for guitar would be the low E , which would be the space below the third ledger line below the treble cleff staff.

if you're notating very high notes , all above the 12th fret say, you could write the whole passage in 8va , which means play an octave higher than written.

otherwise , you would use ledger lines above the staff.

writing guitar in grand staff wouln't really make any sense because you need only go three ledger lines below the staff for any guitar music .
#6
Also guitar sheet music is written an octave higher than its actually played traditionally, so you need to take that into account.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Sep 18, 2006,
#7
Quote by stringzzz
writing guitar in grand staff wouln't really make any sense because you need only go three ledger lines below the staff for any guitar music .

For the most part, that's true. But like I said, for any song that uses extensive use of the guitar's low E through C (lots of thrash metal uses open E or open A as a pedal tone), there would be so many ledger lines that it'd just be easier to notate on the bass clef, not to mention it would look better. I don't know about you, but I'd hate to read sheet music of Metallica's "Master of Puppets" on just the treble clef!
#8
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
Also guitar sheet music is written an actave higher than its actually played traditionally, so you need to take that into account.



correct , and the reason for this is to allow guitar music to be written on one staff.
#9
Quote by SethMegadefan
For the most part, that's true. But like I said, for any song that uses extensive use of the guitar's low E through C (lots of thrash metal uses open E or open A as a pedal tone), there would be so many ledger lines that it'd just be easier to notate on the bass clef, not to mention it would look better. I don't know about you, but I'd hate to read sheet music of Metallica's "Master of Puppets" on just the treble clef!



if your low E is tuned down to a D or even C , the tuning is separate footnote at the begining of the piece.

even though I,m tuned down to D , i'm still going to read that note as an E.
#10
Quote by stringzzz
if your low E is tuned down to a D or even C , the tuning is separate footnote at the begining of the piece.

even though I,m tuned down to D , i'm still going to read that note as an E.

Huh? When I said E through C, I meant E all the way up to C, not down to C. If you have E or A pedal tones, you're still in standard turning, and you're still going to need ledger lines; what point are you trying to get across? I'm afraid I'm confused.
#11
Quote by SethMegadefan
Huh? When I said E through C, I meant E all the way up to C, not down to C. If you have E or A pedal tones, you're still in standard turning, and you're still going to need ledger lines; what point are you trying to get across? I'm afraid I'm confused.



you are going to have a couple of ledger lines that fall into the bass clef , yes.

but in your original post you said something about guitar music being written on the grand staff , which means treble clef and bass clef written separately for the whole piece (i.e. piano music )

this is not the case for guitar music.
#12
Quote by stringzzz
but in your original post you said something about guitar music being written on the grand staff , which means treble clef and bass clef written separately for the whole piece (i.e. piano music )

this is not the case for guitar music.

...Are you sure? I'm almost positive I've seen guitar music on a grand staff before... cripes, I'm like 99% sure here...
#13
Quote by SethMegadefan
...Are you sure? I'm almost positive I've seen guitar music on a grand staff before... cripes, I'm like 99% sure here...



you were probably either looking at a bass part or a keyboard arrangement.
#14
Quote by stringzzz
you were probably either looking at a bass part or a keyboard arrangement.

Yeah, I guess that's possible. Come to think of it, most of the sheet music I get wasn't originally composed for guitar, so yeah, I could just always be looking at keyboard arrangements and I just play them on the guitar. That's probably it, now that I think about it.
#15
Thanks guys this I quite a bit of help I'm getting a better grasp on things. THis my be of topic but it does have to do with the sheet music. On power tab were above the tab it shows the sheet music sometimes the same exact notes aren't shown the same on the actual sheet music. Does any know why? Also thanks for link that fret warrior thatll defianetly be useful.
#16
Quote by I likeallguitar
On power tab were above the tab it shows the sheet music sometimes the same exact notes aren't shown the same on the actual sheet music. Does any know why?

Could you post a pic? From what I understand, power tab makes tab and sheet music exactly the same. I've never used it myself, though, so I'm not sure. Could you maybe explain a bit more, or get a picture up?
#18
Assuming you have a PC and not a Mac, you should have a PrtSc (print screen) key somewhere on your keyboard. Just look at what you want to take a picture of, and hit that key; it will copy a picture of the entire screen.
Now go to Paint or Photoshop or something and just hit Paste. If done right your screenshot should then be pasted into your document.
Save the picture and go to some sort of image hosting service. If you have a Photobucket account already, that's great. If not, either get one (it's free and fast), or use another image hosting site that you're registered on. Just do whichever's easiest.
Once uploaded, your pic should then be given an image code. If it's not listed right under the picture (like Photobucket I know does), then just right-click the image and hit "properties", and the url will be there too. Just copy/paste that url into your basic image tags
[img]paste url here[/img]

in your post, and voila! It should appear.
I'm sorry if I'm being too vague. For one thing, I'm very computer-illiterate, and I'm bad at explaining things to go along with that. So if you're still having problems posting images of screenshots, just ask. I'd be more than happy to clarify further (and I promise to try not to confuse you any more than you already may be confused!).