#1
Alright I've got a few questions about band practicing since I just formed my first band

We have no singer so we decided that we would just do make shift vocals for practices and it's looking like I might end up singing Cocaine by Eric Clapton now the question is

Here is where the situation gets a little tricky

I have no intentions of doing vocals long term ever but since we can't find a singer and no one has the equipment what do I need for practices? and when eventually playing a show (which is one our goals, to play at least a few small gigs) can I rely on a place to have something for us to use vocal wise? I'm kind of short on cash since all my money goes towards gas and guitar stuff since that is my main focus

thanks to all the kind people in the musicians talk forum!
Quote by brandonian
you nose started bleeding, so the first thing you do is post it on UG? i don't understand the reasoning behind that one my friend



Quote by unplugtheradio
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#2
Well i think that if you dont want to be a singer then you shouldn't worry too mcuh about vocal practice/ equipment. Just try to find someone to sing for you guys.

But since you asked, most decent venues have their own equipment for vocalists, and singers at practice usually use a small pa (300 watts or so) or sing through a bass/keyboard amp (what i do... although its not great, its cheaper than a PA) and... yah. You also need a semi-decent mic and cable.

But i stand by my recommendation. Either find someone to sing or have one of your current members get REALLY hyped about singing full-time.
#3
thanks

but why Bass instead of a gutiar amp doesn't it cover a wider range or frequencies or what not, Yeah i know I really don't know what I'm talking about here but what type/size bass or keyboard amp would be the best

any one else?
Quote by brandonian
you nose started bleeding, so the first thing you do is post it on UG? i don't understand the reasoning behind that one my friend



Quote by unplugtheradio
screw grammar i practice economic typing.
#4
A singing guitarist, whether you really saw yourself as one or not, is a guitarist with more skills and that is always desirable if this band doesn't work out.

you could, if you arrange what would happen to the equipment if the band broke up, purchase a mic and a cable with the band all chipping in a little bit of money. Or, play a gig that has a mic and use the money earned by the band to buy one.

DJ
#5
if you're going to buy a bass/keyboard amp, make sure that it's bigger (or, plain and simple, louder) than your guitar amps. I made the mistake of buying an amp that is the same size as my guitar amp and you totally could not hear the vox. And Vox are quite important.
#6
Well a bass/keyboard amp works better from my experience because it is mroe true to the sound

Most cheap guitar amps are really REALLY high pitched and make your voice sound like the Strokes. Plus if you have sort of a deepish voice (like me) then you could damage the amp and it would be nearly inaudible when you hit your lower notes

bass/keyboard amps are generally recommended for cheap vocal amplification
#7
Quote by Animeguy
Well i think that if you dont want to be a singer then you shouldn't worry too mcuh about vocal practice/ equipment. Just try to find someone to sing for you guys.

But since you asked, most decent venues have their own equipment for vocalists, and singers at practice usually use a small pa (300 watts or so) or sing through a bass/keyboard amp (what i do... although its not great, its cheaper than a PA) and... yah. You also need a semi-decent mic and cable.

But i stand by my recommendation. Either find someone to sing or have one of your current members get REALLY hyped about singing full-time.


no. A) you don't really need 300 watts
B) don't get a keyboard amp. get one of the cheap P.A. kits. stereo, room for more channels when you need them, and you will ALWAYS find you need another channel for something, I have 8 channels and I'm running out. it'll also have reverb, you'll be able to practice as well as be ready for all the minor gigs that you don't think are important now, but you need for expierience. when you're trying to play a private birthday party, you'll thank me. Get one of the fender Passport series, I've heard good things.

edit: just try and keep in mind the fact that vocals are another instrument, and they are, depending on what kind of you music you play, much more important that the guitar MOST of the time. so don't skimp out too much. get a decent mic at the least. cheap ones make you sound airy and bad, or boomy and bad.

doubledit: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Passport-P150-Portable-PA-System?sku=480634 worth the money. I spent upwards of 1,200 on essentially the same thing
Last edited by Spazz128735 at Jan 12, 2007,
#8
Sorry to hijack the thread but yeah my band has been having some vocal problems. You see, I DO intend to be able to do either lead vocals and/or backing vocals and was wondering if it's necessary to get a PA system for myself. So it's a yes then right? About how many watts in case I need to provide the system myself for small-medium sized gigs? (Like b day parties as mentioned)
#9
FIRST OF ALL... WHAT THE HELL EVER HAPPENED TO WRITING ORIGINAL SONGS?!

Second, IF you are a good singer, go for it.

If not, believe me... find one.

That doesn't imitate other singers.

He/she has to have his/her own voice.

Anyway, if you're going to stick with it...

The worst option is to get a REAL mic (with the three lil' plugs) and get a transformer to plug it into an amp.

The okay option is to use an acoustic amp... again... with a REAL mic.

The best option is to buy a small $150 - $250 P.A system on www.musiciansfriend.com