#1
Right. I replaced the stock neck humbucker in my Peavey with an old PAF from an 89 JEM. Thing is, its ****.

It sounded great in the bridge of my squier. But now its seems weak and flat. Could I have wired it wrong? I did the earth wire, and then soldered the red and white together to the pot on the same spot.

Any help?
#4
you dont use a bridge pickup as a replacement for a neck pickup.
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#5
Quote by blueeleguitar
you dont use a bridge pickup as a replacement for a neck pickup.

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#6
Quote by blueeleguitar
you dont use a bridge pickup as a replacement for a neck pickup.


You can use whatever pickup you like in the neck - many artists do, and it certainly wouldn't account for the weak output you're getting.
By chance, I came across this http://www.spencley.com/projectguitar/ - a guy who was fitting a DiMarzio PAF (which is what's fitted in JEMS) and he had the same problem, and solved it.
#7
Considering the PAF is intended as a neck pick up............


Well does anyone know about the wiring as its old? I know the bare wire is the earth but then there is a white and a red that come from one wire. Are they both hot and get soldered to the pot? Because thats what i have done
#8
All I can suggest is that you take the white to hot and the red to ground - if the pickup sounds out of phase i.e. hollow sound, then just reverse the connections.
#9
Quote by blueeleguitar
you dont use a bridge pickup as a replacement for a neck pickup.

That doesn't explain it because dedicated bridge pickups usually run hotter than neck pickups to compensate for the tighter string oscillation.
Quote by reeced
All I can suggest is that you take the white to hot and the red to ground - if the pickup sounds out of phase i.e. hollow sound, then just reverse the connections.

He's right. You should ultimately have 2 wires connected to your ground and one to your switch (hot).
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#11
I think it's to reduce noise. One grounds the chassis of the pickup while the other completes the actual circuit.
Hi, I'm Peter
#12
Right I tried that and still no luck. I can get it to work, but it is just sounding too flat and weedy, not like a ****ing PAF!!!!

ANY ideas before I have to rip my guitar open again???