#1
what are modes used for? like, when i use a scale in a different mode, what's the difference? it's the same notes, so i don't see what i could do with them, could someone explain to me? Thanks
#2
Modes are useful for achieving a different sound while staying in the same key. That's what I use them for. They are also useful for soloing in jazz.


Relation between modes and Major scales

Ionian(major)
Dorian: b3 b7
Phrygian: b2 b3 b6 b7
Lydian: #4
Mixolydian: b7
Aeolian(Natural Minor): b3 b6 b7
Locrian: b2 b3 b5 b6 b7

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#3
hm, how do you do that? how does that different sound come in? it's the same notes is it not?
#5
Quote by frankieD2989
the diffrent sound comes from using a resolving to a diffrent root note


Not quite. The different sound comes from the way the notes relate to each other. Say you are in A minor (aeolian) An A to a C is a minor third, but if you were playing in Locrian, that would now be a B to a C, which would be a minor second.
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#6
do you see the difference in the chords or melody making? i dont' get it too much for some reason. i'm going to look a bit more into it, but any help will be greatly greatly appreciated, this is where i am stuck at the moment in my theory studying.
#7
Quote by frankieD2989
the diffrent sound comes from using a resolving to a diffrent root note



Also the chord being played behind it.
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#8
Quote by Nautaflcl
do you see the difference in the chords or melody making? i dont' get it too much for some reason. i'm going to look a bit more into it, but any help will be greatly greatly appreciated, this is where i am stuck at the moment in my theory studying.



in the key of lets say c major

when your playing a c major chord you could use c ionian to solo over it.

When d minor comes. Play D dorian because thats the mode for D in this key.

The chord defines the mode
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#9
Yep. If you are playing in C major and have an F chord playing under it, you would be playing in F Lydian.

Also:

*COPY and PASTE RESPONSE *

Okay...the modes of the major scale. Each degree of a major scale can be a starting point for a new scale called a mode. Each mode has it's own unique intervals, which you must emphasize to get the "correct" sound out of them.

C major: C D E F G A B

C major's modes:

C Ionian (major) C D E F G A B
D Dorian D E F G A B C
E Phrygian E F G A B C D
F Lydian F G A B C D E
G Mixolydian G A B C D E F
A Aeolian (minor) A B C D E F G
B Locrian B C D E F G A

I'll explain more later, but I have to go at the moment.

Ok, back! Anyway, every major scale follows that mode pattern (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, etc.)

Now, I bet you are wondering: Why does a mode matter if it has the same notes as it's major scale? Good question.

The harmonic order of strengths can answer that question! The harmonic order of strengths is 1 3 5 7 9(2) 11(4) 13(6)

This will make sense in a minute. Let's say you are writing a solo or a song in C Ionian (major). If you resolve on the 1st degree of the scale (C) then the resolution would be stronger than if you resolved to, say, B, which is the 7th degree of the scale. So the farther to the left of the HOS, the more complete the resolution will be; the farther to the right, the weaker.

Now, let's say you are writing a song or solo in G Mixolydian. If you resolve on C (the 4th degree of the G Mixolydian scale), then as you can see, 4(11) would be pretty far to the right on the HOS, thus resulting in a weaker resolution.

The chord(s) being played under the mode also have an affect on the sound of the mode. If you are playing a C major scale over an F chord, you would be playing in F Lydian.
Last edited by kirbyrocknroll at Sep 19, 2006,
#10
h/o, i think i kind of get it, i just sat here and thought about it for about......ten minutes.lol but hm, if you could do me one huge ultimate favor, and give me an example, like, an actual example. of how that would sound different than soloing over the chord in it's normal order. thanks, if it's not too much, thanks. :]
#11
k, got it, but i have a new question, what is a resolution? like, farther to the right, weaker, but farther to the left, stronger, but what is a resolution?
#12
Ex:

A standard Chord Progression in C major is:

C major-F major-G major-C major(hold this chord for 4 beats [or whatever])

You would be resolving to the C major chord.

#13
ok, i think i pretty much got it. , thanks alot. much. so the farther to the left, the stronger the resolution and the farther to the right, the weaker, gotcha. thanks alot man, i think i got it. i'll try that out, thanks alot. :]