#1
The other day I posted a thread about properly daisy chaining some fx pedals, since I'm getting a new rig. I've been playing guitar for over half my life, but sadly, I've never owned a decent tube amp. Plenty of nice - decent solid states, but never anything remotely close to the half stack I'm getting, hopefully by Friday.

I should've had it either today or tomorrow, but musicians friend dicked around for three days and didn't bother to verify the card info until this morning after I threatened to cancel the order, which I subsequently did and hour and a half later. Now waiting on 2 day delivery from Sam Ash!

Anyway, now that thanks to the wisdom of the fine folks here at UG, I now know the proper way to hook all the fx together, I have a few kind of important questions about the amp, so I don't f*** anything up. Oh, and I almost forgot, I downloaded the owners manual from Peavey, and it doesn't really go into any great detail about my questions.

1. How do I hook this thing up?

More specifically, what cable (besides the obvious power cable) goes where? and What do I set the impedance to if I'm going to be using a single 4x12 cab?

2. What FX do I run through the fx loop and which ones do I not? (I read somewhere about not running any kind of gain/overdrive through the fx loop)

3. What are some good sites that list different set ups and amp settings?

Once again, thx in advance.
#2
1. Its straightforward, theres an output on the back of the head which goes into the back of the cab :P.

2. Its completely up to you, its personal preference. I personally prefer to have all my effects before my amp, instead of in the fx loop. try different stuff and see what you like.

3. You can get good settings on the UG Ultimate Settings forum :P
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#3
Quote by Ibanezsabb

1. How do I hook this thing up?

More specifically, what cable (besides the obvious power cable) goes where? and What do I set the impedance to if I'm going to be using a single 4x12 cab?

you need a "speaker" cable that goes between your speaker out on your amp, and the input on the cab. Your cab will have an ohm impedance rating, and the jack will probably be labeled for stereo or mono coressponding to the input used. Just match up the head impedance setting with whatever jack you use, preferable the mono input. You can use regular instrument cable for the FX loop. FX send goes to your pedals, FX return comes from your pedals back into the amp


2. What FX do I run through the fx loop and which ones do I not? (I read somewhere about not running any kind of gain/overdrive through the fx loop)

no set rule, whatever sounds best. Normally, people use modulation effects like chorus, delay, reverb, etc. on the loop, and OD/Distortion in front.


3. What are some good sites that list different set ups and amp settings?

Once again, thx in advance.

can't help there, maybe go to the ultimate settings sticky, that might have something you're looking for.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#4
1. Just run a "Speaker" cable from the powered output of the head to the back of the cab. The cab will have a certain impedance. Set the head to that impedence and you will be fine. Never turn the head on when it is not connected to a cabinet.

2. Most of the time, modulation effects are put into the effect loop. Put overdrives in front of the amp along with wah.

3. Just check the Settings thread. There are many. I recommend playing around with it yourself until you get a sound that you like. What someone else thinks sounds great, you may dislike.
#5
I also have a question about how to hook up a cab and head.

I've been playing guitar for a pretty long time but I've never had a head/cab. Recently I purchased an old Sound City 50 Plus head. I also bought 2 Celestion Vintage 30's (8 ohms) and am almost finished making a custom 2x12 cabinet.

Since I have never worked a head I need some help. All of these questions are noob-ish, but I'm just afraid that I'll **** something up and destroy my head.

For reference here is a link to the front of the head : http://www.blackguitars.com/Sound%20City/soundcity50.jpg

1. At the front of the head, there are 4 inputs. Two Brilliant and two Normal. I take it this is for Stereo. My cabinet will be in mono. Which inputs should I use? Does that mean everytime I want to switch the channel, I have to unplug the cable and plug it into the other one?

2. At the back there is a switch for volts (V), what determines what voltage I use?

3. At the front, on the far right, there are two switches. One is for Standby/On, the other is for Mains/On. Because there is no switch for off, does that mean the head will always be on standby? Also, what does the Mains switch do, and when do I use it?

4. You guys mentioned that you must use a "speaker" cable to connect the head and cab. Is that just a normal 1/4" cable that you would use from the guitar to the cab?

5. There is a 3 way switch on the back of the head labelled "Grounding Switch" what exactly does this do?

I cant thank you enough for taking the time to read and (maybe) answer all my silly questions.

Thank you all very much!
#6
Quote by xgilmourisgodx
I also have a question about how to hook up a cab and head.

I've been playing guitar for a pretty long time but I've never had a head/cab. Recently I purchased an old Sound City 50 Plus head. I also bought 2 Celestion Vintage 30's (8 ohms) and am almost finished making a custom 2x12 cabinet.

Since I have never worked a head I need some help. All of these questions are noob-ish, but I'm just afraid that I'll **** something up and destroy my head.

For reference here is a link to the front of the head : http://www.blackguitars.com/Sound%20City/soundcity50.jpg

1. At the front of the head, there are 4 inputs. Two Brilliant and two Normal. I take it this is for Stereo. My cabinet will be in mono. Which inputs should I use? Does that mean everytime I want to switch the channel, I have to unplug the cable and plug it into the other one?

I don't actually think that's for stereo, but rather for input sensitivity like the old Marshalls. The low sensitivity inputs were for hot pickups and whatnot. Also, if it's like an old marshall, you can jump the inputs with a patch cable to get more gain. For switching between the inputs, an A/B or A/B/Y box might work well.

edit: You might not want to try the "jumping" trick, I know it works with old marshalls, but they have a very simple design, I'm not familiar with your amp or how the inputs are wired.


2. At the back there is a switch for volts (V), what determines what voltage I use?
it's for your line voltage where you plug the amp in, one setting is probably for North American standard 120 volts, one is probably for the EU 220V.


3. At the front, on the far right, there are two switches. One is for Standby/On, the other is for Mains/On. Because there is no switch for off, does that mean the head will always be on standby? Also, what does the Mains switch do, and when do I use it?

Both switches up - standby is on, power is off. No power is going to the amp because the mains switch is off.

power switch down(on), standby up(standby position) - amp is powered up, but no signal running thru the tubes because the amp is still in "standby" position. Leave it like this for a minute when you first turn the amp on to let the tubes heat up to operating temp. The amp should be on(any indicator lights on), but you won't hear anything because only the heater filaments in the tubes are active.

power switch down(on), and standby switch down to "ON" position(off standby) - Amp is powered up, and tubes have signal, you should be hearing sound at this point, with the amp functioning normal.


4. You guys mentioned that you must use a "speaker" cable to connect the head and cab. Is that just a normal 1/4" cable that you would use from the guitar to the cab?

It's not normal instrument cable, instrument cable is shielded, and uses very thin wire. Speaker cable is a much thicker wire, and it is unshielded. Instrument cable is meant to carry the passive signal from your guitar to the amp. Speaker cable takes the powered signal from your amp head, and powers your speaker cabinet. There is MUCH more power going thru the speaker cable obviously.


5. There is a 3 way switch on the back of the head labelled "Grounding Switch" what exactly does this do?


That's for noise issues where you have ground loops with other equipment and hum. You can use that to lift the circuit from grounding to the chasis. You don't need to worry about it unless you are getting ground hum.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Sep 22, 2006,
#7
Quote by Erock503
I don't actually think that's for stereo, but rather for input sensitivity like the old Marshalls. The low sensitivity inputs were for hot pickups and whatnot. Also, if it's like an old marshall, you can jump the inputs with a patch cable to get more gain. For switching between the inputs, an A/B or A/B/Y box might work well.

I just have to get one thing strait... When you "jump the inputs with a patch cable to get more gain", what inputs do you use ? I have an old marshall with 4 inputs, and I use the treblely highgain input.. I could use some more gain and think it sounds like something for me...

http://www.shibuyagakki.com/studio/studioimage/astkizai/jcm800.JPG

its not my amp, but its a similar... I use the upper left input
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#8
4 inputs

input 1 --------------input 2

O 1. high sens ----------O 2. high sens.

O 1. low sens -----------O 2. low sens.


you plug the guitar into the upper input 1, high sensitivity

take a 1/4" instrument patch cable, and run from (input 1 low sensitivity) to the upper (input 2 high sensitivity)

this bridges your inputs
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#9
ok thanks
Gibson Les Paul Standard
Takamine G Series 6&12 string accoustics

Marshall JCM 800 50w 1987 (4 input)
Marshall 1936 Cab

Jim Dunlop CryBaby
MXR 10 band EQ

R n'fn' R!
#10
np
Quote by xgilmourisgodx
I also have a question about how to hook up a cab and head.

I've been playing guitar for a pretty long time but I've never had a head/cab. Recently I purchased an old Sound City 50 Plus head. I also bought 2 Celestion Vintage 30's (8 ohms) and am almost finished making a custom 2x12 cabinet.

btw, forget to mention it, but you should pay close attention to how you are going to wire those speakers. If you wire them in serial, it's going to be 16ohm together, if you wire them in parallel, it will be a total of 4ohm. You want to make sure you set your amp head accordingly to match whatever impedance it's going to see, depending how you wire your cab. It should have either a switch or different outputs on the back corresponding to the impedance.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Sep 22, 2006,
#13
I'm getting a crackling/buzzing/humming noise coming out of my head... and I dont think its my guitar because even when I turn the volume down on my guitar the noise doesnt disappear.
I've tried the ground switch in all the positions and it doesnt work. I've tried all the inputs and its still the same deal. I also messed around with the sensitivity switch and tried different combinations with the ground switch, and im always getting buzz.
One thing I noticed is that when I put the sensitivity to 2, the buzzing/crackling changes into a humming noise.
Another thing I've discovered is that changing the volume on the head doesnt affect the volume of the buzzing.
Does anyone have any suggestions or advice?
Thank you very much.
#14
That's usually the sign of a bad preamp tube, especially since it's there even with the guitar volume down. how old are the tubes?
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#16
yeah, definitely time for a tube change. Powertubes last about 1-2 years with average playing time before the sound quality begins to degrade. Preamp tubes usually last twice as long. That's an approximate obviously, there is no set time. You should be really impressed by a tube change if you like the sound now however. When I got my head, the tubes were 3+ years old, and new tubes made it sound like a new amp again. The difference was night and day. I would change the power tubes and preamp tubes while you are at it. You want a matched set of powertubes. Eurotubes, thetubestore, Dougs tubes are all reputable vendors. I like JJ's personally, and Bob over at Eurotubes is very helpful.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#17
I noticed that there is barely ANY difference between my solid state Marshall and my Sound City tube amp... could that be due to the tubes?
#18
hard to say, I don't really know much about the amp, but new tubes should make big difference if the current ones are 5+ years old. My amp sounded very flat and dull with old tubes, and the gain really seemed weak. From everything I've read about those amps though, it should be kicking ass all over a SS amp.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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Last edited by Erock503 at Nov 3, 2006,
#20
np man. I'd be curious to hear that amp. I was reading about Gilmour's rig in GW recently, and he was using the SC L100 back in the day. That thing must have a killer clean tone.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#21
Right now it just sounds like a decent solid state. To be honest I'm freaking out that even with a tube change, it'll still sound like this.
Maybe it's my guitar (Ibanez RG)? I dont know.
#22
well, what kind of sound are you trying to get out of it? At low volumes, it probably will sound like a quality solid state. If you want power tube saturation, you're going to need to crank it up and push the power section, and that takes a lot of volume. From what I've read about those amps, they are based mostly on clean tones, so you use an OD pedal and fx stompboxes to get the sound you want. I think that's why it was Gilmour's choice in amps specifically for that reason. Pickups will make a difference too, however, they aren't going to give you a whole lot more gain if that's what you're after. If you have the stock pups in your RG, they are pretty mediocre(IBZ INF) pickups though. That's the big weakness of the RG. A pup change and new tubes will probably go a long way in improving your tone. There is also the option of an attenuator. This goes between your amp and your speaker cabinet, and allows you to push the amp without all the power getting to your speakers. This way, you can get cranked powertube OD without peeling paint off the wall. Weber make some good units, and THD makes a nice one, although more expensive.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#25
Quote by Erock503
There is also the option of an attenuator. This goes between your amp and your speaker cabinet, and allows you to push the amp without all the power getting to your speakers. This way, you can get cranked powertube OD without peeling paint off the wall. Weber make some good units, and THD makes a nice one, although more expensive.


I was actually considering that, but I was unsure of it. I'm pretty new to this thing, but now that youve mentioned it I will definately look into it.

I have another nooby question. There are two inputs at the back of the head. The guy that I bought it off of labelled them (or one of them).. except its not very clear. The two inputs are right beside each other. He put a label (its unclear if it is two seperate labels or one label in two parts... and its not clear which input its above) that say "Harmonic Distortion Footswitch."I take it this is just distortion in the amp that you need a footswitch to activate. That leaves the question of what the other input is for. Any clue?
#26
no idea man, sounds like a mod that was done to the amp after production. Can you get a pic? I kind of doubt it has distortion, but I obviously don't know much about the amp. Everything I've read about it says it's basically a clean amp however, and the tone controls are the only way to introduce any preamp gain. I guess there is also a master volume mod that is popular for the amp, so you can get more gain from the preamp, but it looks like it's mostly meant for cleans with a ton of headroom. I did find this page however, and it looks pretty useful
http://home.earthlink.net/%7Eiktoblikto/sc_home.htm
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#27
Yeah, it looks like youre right. I noticed writing under one of the inputs but I thought nothing of it until you mentioned it. So they probably are mods. I still have no clue what they do though... Here's a picture.
Attachments:
back 9.jpg
#28
still no idea man, sorry. I know there were mods to add an FX loop and master volume, but I have no idea what a harmonic distortion footswitch does. Any way you can contact the previous owner?
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#30
Sorry to bump the thread, but I own a 1973 Mark 3 Sound City L120 (Dallas Arbiter-era), and it sounds a LOT better than an SS Marshall. It may well be the tubes, but you will find with the right EQing and stuff that you will get the best cleans ever out of this thing! I presume it has an active EQ (turn all three bands down, and you should get no sound). This allows for a really wide range of tones.

You said about an attentuator; this is exactly the reason I bought the L120 - it has attentuated inputs.

Those inputs I have no idea about, mine has had no mods as far as I'm aware, and I can't see anything that has been replaced. SC heads have never had any drive channels, so it could well be a drive channel, or it could be that it bridges the inputs when you use a footswitch.

The humming you are experiencing is the ownership of a Sound City head. They are notorious for being noisy, though it shouldn't really be THAT bad. You can do a mod to the amp to quiten it down a bit, but I've never tried one (mine is still stock)

Any questions regarding the amp in particular that you want to ask or that I have missed then do ask me. Post in here, PM me, or add me on MSN. Whatever.
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