#1
Lately I've been getting sick of tabs, they're often inaccurate (even the top rated ones) and sound bad. I talked with and read about many musicians who say that it's best to listen and play. The things is I have no ear. Am i doomed, or can a person learn how to "listen" and then play stuff. any tips or anything would be awesome.
#2
what i do is first learn the tab version, then play it along with a CD and u'll find what parts are wrong. then its just trial and error till ur figure it completely out
#5
kool cuz i do like know the pentatonics, modes, and all the scales and stuff. thanks all.
#6
everyone has an ear, you just have to develop it
A man said to the universe:
"Sir, I exist!"
"However," replied the universe,
"The fact has not created in me
a sense of obligation."
#7
Quote by str4trocker
Lately I've been getting sick of tabs, they're often inaccurate (even the top rated ones) and sound bad. I talked with and read about many musicians who say that it's best to listen and play. The things is I have no ear. Am i doomed, or can a person learn how to "listen" and then play stuff. any tips or anything would be awesome.
You say the top-rated tabs sound bad, and yet you're aware that you have no ear for pitch.

Well, you're certainly right on the second account

Maybe you should just tune your guitar. If seventy other people think a tab is near-perfect, and you're the only one who thinks otherwise, it might just be you or your guitar.
#8
An exercise I've wanted to try for training my ear is this:

Have someone play a few notes or something and then try to play it back (you can't be looking at each other though...) as if you were tabbing a song. Or record something you have improvised and try to work it out by ear maybe a week later.

Or just try to tab an easy song. I seem to have lost my ear and am trying to find it again
#9
i don't think I've ever found a tab that is 100% complete and accurate, but they're usually a good starting point though and do save you a bit of time, and like someone else said, a bit of theory will help you narrow things down more quickly.

Another trick I use is to listen to the song and try to sing a part I'm trying to learn and then hold the first note and work it what it is on the guitar, I think I've got reasonably good relative pitch (ability to judge intervals) which helps quite a bit too and is probably easier to learn than perfect pitch.
#12
Actually its amazing how often even so-called "professional" tab (songbooks, magazines) is wrong.

Oftentimes not in a major way, just minor stuff.... the thing is, the main reason to learn other people's stuff is to get your fingers and head to do something new they might not be used to doing, in which case its really helpful to have everything, even down to position on the neck, exactly right.