#6
"The New Complete Guitarist" if you care enough to actually buy a book. Books, FTW.
Hi, I'm Peter
#7
Quote by breakstuff
how about a free internet source.......smartass

you didnt specify free or internet in your first post.... jackass

i also suggest you get a book, probably be better than most stuff you can find online. some people on here highly suggest The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine. i myself havent picked up a copy yet, but its something i plan on doing. college textbooks should be good as well, even if they are more expensive than other books. heck even taking a college class on intro to theory would be good. im currently enrolled in one at the moment and while it started slow, it looks like its going to be very helpful.

if you are too cheap to buy anything, the best thing to do is read some lessons on places mentioned above or the lessons at www.ultimate-guitar.com and ask qestions in the forum here. also, the archived threads from MT often have great lessons and discussions that you can learn a lot from.
#8
About Mark Levine's Jazz Theory:

It explains everything very well, however, you should be able to read sheet music at least semi-good. All examples are in sheet form, so unless you want to spend 10 minutes deciphering each scale/bar, you'd better read sheet music well. If you can't do that yet: William Leavitt's Modern Method for Guitar!
The "Popped Collar" Award(Sexiest)
Elvenkindje

The "Rest In Real Life" Award(Best Past MT Mod)
Elvenkindje
#9
you didnt specify free or internet in your first post.... jackass

i also suggest you get a book, probably be better than most stuff you can find online. some people on here highly suggest The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine. i myself havent picked up a copy yet, but its something i plan on doing. college textbooks should be good as well, even if they are more expensive than other books. heck even taking a college class on intro to theory would be good. im currently enrolled in one at the moment and while it started slow, it looks like its going to be very helpful.

if you are too cheap to buy anything, the best thing to do is read some lessons on places mentioned above or the lessons at www.ultimate-guitar.com and ask qestions in the forum here. also, the archived threads from MT often have great lessons and discussions that you can learn a lot from.


Not mentioning free or not, doesnt mean im ****ing gonna go to college for it, cant u people think simple, always pretending to be smart, when in fact ur nothing but assholes.
#10
Quote by breakstuff
Not mentioning free or not, doesnt mean im ****ing gonna go to college for it, cant u people think simple, always pretending to be smart, when in fact ur nothing but assholes.

What the ** is your problem? We help you out by providing you with the helpful information! Because the mental ability of someone with Down's Syndrome exceeds yours, you put words in our mouths. No-one, except Atreides in the first post, on which you already gave a ****ty reply, said you should go to college for it. Jof merely stated that college textbooks are a good thing to use.

If you wanted internet sites, you should have stated your question better. Or, better yet, just search. If you search through the first couple of pages here in MT, you'd come across a couple of threads similar to this one. If you look in the lessons, you'll find something on it. If you look in the archives, you'll find lots of things. If you use an external search engine, you'll find tons of sites, more than you could ever possibly comprehend.

Just calm down and stop calling us names. We're trying to help you the best we can, even though your question is vaguely formed.
The "Popped Collar" Award(Sexiest)
Elvenkindje

The "Rest In Real Life" Award(Best Past MT Mod)
Elvenkindje
#11
Quote by breakstuff
Not mentioning free or not, doesnt mean im ****ing gonna go to college for it, cant u people think simple, always pretending to be smart, when in fact ur nothing but assholes.
You ASKED for the best comprehensive source for learning music theory. He gave you his opinion, assuming you were serious about learning everything you could learn. He wasn't pretending to be smart, he was giving an honest opinion.

YOU decided to take it out of context, it's not his f*cking fault.

Deal.

Now, as for music theory, if you want a lesson on this site, this lesson is good.

http://ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html
Master of Puppies
#14
I needed some music theory knowledge myself, as my old teacher left many gaps, I've tried cyberfret before but it didn't help much. I'm checking out zentao, looks pretty good, and will later check out musictheory.net. (when I'm done with the Zentao course)
#15
Quote by TooLateForRoses
I needed some music theory knowledge myself, as my old teacher left many gaps, I've tried cyberfret before but it didn't help much. I'm checking out zentao, looks pretty good, and will later check out musictheory.net. (when I'm done with the Zentao course)


For me Zentao was a big help and the knowledge I learnt there I can now apply in practice. I had lots of books but it just wouldn't click after reading their stuff it did.
-Mithaearon-
"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should."
#16
Quote by breakstuff
Not mentioning free or not, doesnt mean im ****ing gonna go to college for it, cant u people think simple, always pretending to be smart, when in fact ur nothing but assholes.

You've also proved your illiteracy. He was recommending a guitar system, not that you go take a class. You can go away now, n00b.
Hi, I'm Peter
#17
Quote by breakstuff
Not mentioning free or not, doesnt mean im ****ing gonna go to college for it, cant u people think simple, always pretending to be smart, when in fact ur nothing but assholes.
This type of reply is counter-productive, at least in this forum. While there is a great deal of free theory information on the Internet, at some point you're probably going to need to break down and buy some resources to go deeper.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#18
Quote by gpb0216
This type of reply is counter-productive, at least in this forum. While there is a great deal of free theory information on the Internet, at some point you're probably going to need to break down and buy some resources to go deeper.

Puhleeeeeze. We ALL know that something isn't worth learning if you can't find it for free on the net...
Hi, I'm Peter
#19
Quote by Dirk Gently
Puhleeeeeze. We ALL know that something isn't worth learning if you can't find it for free on the net...
I hope you're joking.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#20
Quote by gpb0216
I hope you're joking.

Yes, I was. You were supposed to laugh at that
Hi, I'm Peter
#21
Quote by gpb0216
This type of reply is counter-productive, at least in this forum. While there is a great deal of free theory information on the Internet, at some point you're probably going to need to break down and buy some resources to go deeper.


Well I am looking to get into music theory in a much deeper sense. I'm looking for a book that starts relatively simple and moves to more complex ideas. I realize there is free information on the internet, but I would like to have something where I don't have to sit in front of my computer screen studying for hours, a.k.a. take into the bathroom with me. Anyways, I am looking for good suggestions from people like Kirby, gpb, etc. that have already proven they know what they are talking about. Anyways, thanks in advance!
#22
I haven't proven that I know anything, but I used Eric Taylor's AB guide to music theory Part I to learn. That takes you up to a grade 5 theory exam level (enough for music A level). Part II takes you beyond that, but I haven't learnt that.
Quote by VR2005
Very good post Marmoseti, you're on the right track.



Because footstools are cool - UG's Classical Guitarists


PM Marmoseti or Confusius to join
#23
well the book my intro to theory class is using is The Elements of Music: Concepts and Applications (second edition) by Ralph Turek. i havent actually bought it yet so i dont know how good it is, but i do know it starts simple because the class did. it has exercises in it as well so you can practice what you learn. i would assume it gets at least somewhat complex because weve been moving at a good pace and still have a couple months left in the semester.

the mark levine book i mentioned earlier is also good, but is all in standard so if you cant read that you should learn. again, i dont have this one, but i have looked through it a bit. it is recomended by a bunch of people in MT tho, and from what i read it looked really good and is something you might want to pick up.

and you can always take a laptop into the bathroom for some reading, i know ive done it.
Last edited by jof1029 at Sep 21, 2006,
#24
Quote by Unbridled
Well I am looking to get into music theory in a much deeper sense. I'm looking for a book that starts relatively simple and moves to more complex ideas. I realize there is free information on the internet, but I would like to have something where I don't have to sit in front of my computer screen studying for hours, a.k.a. take into the bathroom with me. Anyways, I am looking for good suggestions from people like Kirby, gpb, etc. that have already proven they know what they are talking about. Anyways, thanks in advance!
I think a good place to start would be to ask you a question: Where are you on the theory path? Put another way, with what aspects of theory do you feel really, really comfortable? There's no right answer here, and nobody is going to call you a noob if you're just getting started (at least, I hope nobody would do that - after all, we're all just getting started, really.)

Once we can determine your position it'll be easier to choose the tools that will meet you where you are and carry you forward most effectively.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#25
Quote by Atreideslegend
The RGT/London college of music electric guitar level system is probably the best.


People, it was that first reply that ticked me off, when you ask a question like the one I asked, you usually expect an internet source or a book, which is illustrated by Mithaearon's response.

To all the other members who contributed:

Thanks to all who provided me with links and books which were all helpful, hope this thread can keep going to become a reasonable music theory source generator.
Last edited by breakstuff at Sep 21, 2006,
#26
Well, I would have to say, I understand the concept behind the construction of the major scale really, really well. Although I have not fully memorized the names and such of intervals (not just major 2nd, minor 3rd, etc. but rather, dominant, subtonic, etc.), but they make perfect sense when I read them. Again, I have not memorized all of the possible permutations of different types of chords, but the construction of chords I understand really well. I grasp concepts really quickly, and I'm wanting to move past this sort of beginner stage. But, I would like it if the book kind of brushed on these topics as well to help give me a compilation of reference sources and help me to brush up on these things as well. I hope I have helped explain vaguely where I stand and also that I am not being too specific. Again, thanks for the help!