#1
Ok I FINNALY got chords figured out, but now I am having a slight problem with doing chord inversions. I am unsure on what it means by played in a higher octave. For instance lets say we are going to use the seventh A# minor chord.

Which is A#, C#, F, G# now if we play it like that it would be the root verison of the chord. That much I understand now the tricky part is when it starts going into inversions. Such as if I played the second note first like so C#, F, G# than the root note A# would be played higher? How exactly would I play it higher? what does that mean.

In the book I am reading it has aa example which says when a chord is in its third invesion its played like so.

F, hiA#, hiC#, hiF. Now this really confuses the crap outa me because I am really unsure on what hi means other than the fact that the note needs to be played higher. It doesnt really state in what I am reading, all it states is that it needs to be a octave higher. So how would I make it higher on a bass?
#2
Octave pedal should do the trick

Or use a capo up at the 12th frets! I cant imagine that working out that well though....
#3
OK, first of all when you try and figure out stuff, start easy. Dont start with A# Minor ! Start with C Major, nice and easy to get your head around things..

OK, so inversions are quite simple. C major consists of C, E, G right? So, the first inversion is moving the C to the bottom, making it E, G, C. It's still a C Major chord. Now taking the second inversion, we move the G to the bass note, making it G, C, E. Still a C Major chord.

That's it, simple.

Now that take that and try and work out all the inversions for all 12 keys!.

Remember, you are basing this on triads, so Root, 3rd and 5th

Any Q's?
#4
Ok so with inversion it doesnt have to be played diffrently? just the notes are in diffrent order? because I guess the book made it out to be that the notes had to be played diffrently if you changed the order. (with all scales) Seemed like It wanted me to play the note sin a higher tone for some reason maybe I just am miss reading this book a bit.
#5
Well inversions are not usually arppegiated you see, they are played as chords, so it's far less relevant on bass. However, you should know inversions because it gives you the ability to play over a chord and not necessarily start on the root. So, if the guitarist is playing in C, you could quite easily start your bassline with the root note being E, ie the first inversion. it will sound just fine, because it is in the scale. If you have a piano/keyboard at home, it's easier to get your head around... it changes the tonal character because the bass note is different..
#6
A#m is A#, C#, E#, G#. E# and F are enharmonics but not the same note.
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=412512&highlight=diminished
look for my post on intervals.


Inversion just means the bass note isn't the root. "Root position" is the term for the chord when it's not in an inversion.
"1st inversion" means the 3rd of the chord is the root, "2nd inversion" is the 5th, etc.
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BA in Music theory
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#8
^ if you noted, I said multiple things in that post that were relevant to the topic. I also thought I explained it more simply and clearer, but you can be an ass if you like.
Quote by casualty01
the RIAA can't shut us down, interpol can't shut us down. the U.S. gov't can't shut us down and CERTAINLY not YOU can shut us down.


BA in Music theory
MusicMan Bongo, SUB -> Orange Terror 1000 stack

Quote by waterproofpie
it's a UtBDan sandwich. Awwww yeah!
#10
Well the reason I was asking is because I am learning the root method for playing bass atm and trying to get a grasp on arrpegio. Which I believe plays the 1st third and 5th of each chord. Which would mean that it plays the major chords right? unless I have this idea on arrpegio wrong? My teacher I believe only really teachs the root method, arrpegio and walking bass. Trying to get arrpegio down so I can do walking bass next.

Mostly intrested in arrpegio because than I can hopefully play to that drum line that applehead gave me.
#11
Arpeggio just means played seperately in succession, as opposed to playing it together to form a chord. So you can arpeggiate any chord, whether it be major, minor, diminished...whatever. Just take the chord and play the notes in succession (usually lowest to highest, but there are no rules)...

edit: p.s arpeggios usually contain the octave as well..
#12
Happen to know where I could find out a bit more info on it? or perhaps a place where I could find some examples. and so this could be used with any chord so major, minor, ect the scales you said ok thats good to know. But unless I am mistaken he says here on his notes that the 1st, 3rd and fth of each chord is played. Not all chords are made up of the 1st 3rd and 5th though?
#13
Honestly, bro, i think you are complicating it.. arpeggio means roughly "like a harp", as in you play one at a time. That's it. You are thinking of a Major chord arpeggiated, that would be root, 3rd, 5th, octave. but it can't be that for a Minor chord, as you said. So instead you lower the 3rd, but you still play them seperately in succession.

Who says what on who's notes?
#14
My bass teacher he wrote down basicly I guess what he teachs, which is as I stated above the root method, the arrepigo and the walking bass. He stated that the arrepgio is playing the 1st 3rd and 5th notes of the chord. In his notes he gave me anyway. I would also like information on the walking bass so i can learn it a bit.

I am getting music theroy though its sorta taking some monkeying around with It to get it. i just accualy managed to memorize the fret board today. Basicly what I am trying to accomplish is how to play with that drum track you had me download. Thats what I am trying to learn get to at this point. Thats my goal at least, is to figure out what I need to do so I can play along with that drum track.
#15
Quote by Sturek
My bass teacher he wrote down basicly I guess what he teachs, which is as I stated above the root method, the arrepigo and the walking bass. He stated that the arrepgio is playing the 1st 3rd and 5th notes of the chord. In his notes he gave me anyway. I would also like information on the walking bass so i can learn it a bit.
Go to my band's website http://www.harrycoffeyband.moonfruit.com/ click on enter and then at the bottom right and listen to these tracks Hideaway, Pride and Joy & Matchbox they are 12 bar blues walking bass lines
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#16
Sounds pretty bad ass, still trying to work my way up. Unfornatley there is not much info as far as how things work at least that I have really found. Because I am still trying to learn how to play improv with chords to a drum loop that I have. I will have to do a better search for arrpegio and the walking bass once I have time, maybe can find some more info. Cuz I really wanna play with this drum loop that I have.