#1
Hey guys ive jammed before with guitar and drums but might be jamming with just a drummer soon. Was curious how it differs and any tips in how to interact?

cheers
#2
pretty easy, from my experience

last time I jammed, me and the drums got something going and the guitar did some lead stuff..
#3
You wont have as much low end, but it's still fun. Lots of times, I'll jam with a drummer and we'll come up with something then show it to the bassist and he'll work around it. There's three of us that jam every once in a while an we switch instruments all the time anyway.
Quote by DieGarbageMan
can i get a tl;dr up in this bitch?

A mod makes a joke and hi-jacks a thread...

Quote by paintITblack39
usually, this is often discussed in the political threads ...

let's change the question: are you pro or antti niemi?
#5
this is mainly where slap bass comes into play for me. drum and bass music is all about rythm and groove.
Quote by Mr. T
"Mr. T defines love as the reluctance to murder. If you're still alive, it's because Mr. T loves you."
#6
Jamming with just a drummer can be fun, because it's a lot less demanding. You don't have to worry about meshing well with the guitarist, just keep the on beat and have fun.
#7
^Yes, but you do need to worry about filling up the space the guitarist normally takes up.


Dictator For Life of the fIREHOSE fANCLUB. PM Me, Tedrick, or Yertle to join.
#8
Quote by Metalology
You wont have as much low end, but it's still fun. Lots of times, I'll jam with a drummer and we'll come up with something then show it to the bassist and he'll work around it. There's three of us that jam every once in a while an we switch instruments all the time anyway.


I still find it amazing how guitarists stumble randomly into the bass forum and find somewhere to post it just amazes me

anywho, Jamming with a drummer is pretty well the same as having the guitar there just that when your jamming you stay away from songs with a really simple bassline to keep it interesting (or improvise) and maybe even raise it an octave so you get a bit of the high end and low end at the same time? I don't know about that last one I just made that up now but maybe.
#9
there was a post i saw a while ago for this group called electric toast or something. it was in the "what inspired you to be a bassist" thread. just drum and bass, very good stuff.
Quote by Mr. T
"Mr. T defines love as the reluctance to murder. If you're still alive, it's because Mr. T loves you."
#10
practicing with a drummer is great! as stated, get used to sycronizing with the kick drum. it will improve both of you. work on you're slap, and you're octaves. it can really improve you're fills.
bass and drums are the meat and potatos, guitar is just the gravy.
#11
If you have no experience in improvisation it's kinda boring after a while, it all about the scales and being really innovative if you dont have a guitar.
...And The Nominees Are
#12
Just lock in with the drummer. Start with simple beats and groove away, then see if you can fit something more technical/faster in, especially if its a metal drummer
Cort lover of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join.
On cheating in a relationship...

Quote by metaldud536
If he doesn't use a gameshark, it's not cheating.




I'm a non-regular regular old user.
#13
My brother plays drums, and I play strings, so we jam alot. From my experiences it isn't much different.
The person below me is probably a homosexual.
#14
relax and follow your inner-groove
Call Me Joe
Quote by wesleyisgay
IF MATT DAMON DIES TOMMAROW

FUK



Communist Mormon of 2.21.19.8

Caffeine Head of The Bass Militia
#15
Remember, that since there is no guitar you can basically play WHATEVER YOU WANT! As long as it goes with the drums. REMEMBER THAT! Don't think "Oh I shouldn't play this, it won't sound good". Experiment with a bunch of stuff.

Also, try out some other time signatures besides 4/4. That can be really fun.
#16
Actually, I'd say your better off playing without a guitar sometimes. In a band it is important for the drummer and bassist to be very close musically because they (together) create the rhythm section. Without the rhythm section the guitar sounds weak and their is no direction in the music. Think of the bass and drums as going together, while the guitar is sort of seperate.
Quote by Zero-Hartman

If I can't masturbate to childrens cartoons then this country isn't great.
#17
Heres some tips I've found over the course of many years.
Do a telephone interview. Find out what the drummer currently plays, what they were raised on, what their favorite group is, and what bass players they respect. Do you two mesh at this point? If not, it's going to be a long, painful session.

The day of the session. Park your ego at the door. Did the drummer do the same? Are they going to be a dick to work with? If you are going to lead, pick a riff you like, can inprovise on, and the drummer feels comfortable with. If the drummer is going to lead, let them play a few measures, mentally develop your licks, them jump on in. Play a few measures, develop your combined beat. Sneak in subtle changes to the rhythm. How did the drummer react? Did they pick it up, or get all messed up? Depending on how they reacted, either revert back to simple, or develop your lick.

These are my basics that have worked for me. I've had sessions where they are as painful as surgery without anesthesia, and some so great that you look at your watch and wonder where the time went. Nothing beats a tight bass player/drummer combination. Good luck and let us know how it went.
#18
Play Death From Above songs!

Seriously though, you don't need a guitarist to sound good. You're gonna need plenty of treble so you stand out if he goes mad on the bass drum and toms, and a bit of fuzz would help.