#1
Lately, I've been trying to up my speed...for like a few months I had been very slack with my scale/speed practice, just practicing songs and solos, so I decided to sit down from 45-90 minutes a day devoted solely to running scales w/ a metronome. I kept a log, which showed that it took me 6 days to get from sixteenths at 126 bpm being very difficult to sixteenths at 132 being BARELY doable.

I would start at around 90 bpm and work my way up so the last 10-15 minutes of practice are near the high end.

Well, now comes my question...does this sound reasonable? Do I need to practice differently maybe? I'd like to get up to 12 nps sometime, which is 180 bpm...is that gonna take 2 years?

ty
Originally Posted by Corwinoid
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#2
You can't start at 90bpm playing 16th notes and expect to have any control of your fingers when you speed up.

It's going to take more than two years if you have that measurment in your mind - you think ''I want to reach X speed''.. you're pushing for speed. The more you push, the longer it'll take to come to you.
#3
Yeah, I recently started playing everything at about 2/3 of the speed I KNOW I can play it at several times, and then increasing. In the beginning when I first learned pentatonic patterns, I didn't do that, and it really hindered me after awhile.
#4
Sorry, I was a little vague. My recent practice routine starts at 90.

I played 40-90 a while back, I can do that without thinking with 0 tension.

I'm not sure if I understand how pushing for something means it will take longer...practicing basketball to get a certain out of 10 score wont take longer if you try to reach the goal O.o I dont see how the opposite applies to guitar. I always thought trying to reach a goal...helped you reach the goal.
Originally Posted by Corwinoid
Metal doesn't hold hands, it gets head in the van before the show. Seriously.


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Last edited by Xinlitik at Sep 22, 2006,
#5
Quote by Xinlitik
Sorry, I was a little vague. My recent practice routine starts at 90.

I played 40-90 a while back, I can do that without thinking with 0 tension.

I'm not sure if I understand how pushing for something means it will take longer...practicing basketball to get a certain out of 10 score wont take longer if you try to reach the goal O.o I dont see how the opposite applies to guitar. I always thought trying to reach a goal...helped you reach the goal.

i agree...i thought everyone you ask about guitar they said "you need to have goals"

*shrugs*

i guess you should just keep trying and if it's not working out for you try doing it in different ways until you find what works best for you..everyones different...

great...now i sound like dr phil..
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#6
Sorry for the misunderstanding - I hope this will clear it up.

Of course you should have goals.. places you wanted to reach, music you want to play - those are the reasons you're playing the guitar.

What I meant by pushing was maybe you could phrase it as 'Don't let your ego get in the way' - applied to gaining speed, maybe I should have said don't force it.

Gaining speed and control of your fingers take time - and time is the one thing guitar players in general hate. They don't want to wait for speed, so they go in search of it - trying every new practice routine they can find... they keep pushing, and pushing and forcing and forcing.. then they're surprised when they can't find it.

Speed takes time. Speed takes patience - If you ever find yourself thinking ''Why can't I play fast?'' please stop pushing and wait for speed to come to you. (This by no means don't practice to gain speed, or don't have a goal of being able to play fast.. it simply means don't force it. It will come to you).

Hopefully that cleared up that misunderstanding...
#7
Quote by SchecterGates

great...now i sound like dr phil..

Psh. Dr. Phil is more metal than a factory that produces steel!
#8
If I may put in my two cents here, if you simply practice fast scales, you will get faster at.... playing scales. Nobody wants to hear just scale patterns. Vary your routine to include more practical and interesting licks, and work those up to speed.

Also, like john said, let it come to you. Speed will require practice, and it won't happen very quickly. You may find that the progress you made yesterday seems to have been erased today, and you're back at square one. Be patient. Do you think a runner's time for a mile goes down every single day they go for a run? No, it's a gradual thing that takes work and patience.
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#9
Ah, I understand now. I know it requires patience, I've had to develop a lot in the past week with the tiny progress heh. Guess I'll just keep at it. And no worries, I dont only play the scale up and down, I like to vary it a lot, making my fingers go random places so they're ready for anything. It doesnt always sound good, but it makes my fingers try something different.

Anyway, thanks guys.
Originally Posted by Corwinoid
Metal doesn't hold hands, it gets head in the van before the show. Seriously.


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