#1
Hey, I'm kind of new, but does anyone know anything about the typewriter technique used by entwistle? The closest thing I could get on wikipedia was this:

"Entwistle developed what he called a "typewriter" approach to playing the bass. It involved positioning the right hand over the strings so all four fingers could be used to tap percussively on the strings, causing them to strike the fretboard with a distinctive twangy sound. This gives the player the ability to play three or four strings at once. Or to use several fingers on a single string. It allowed him to create passages that were very percussive and melodic. He used this approach to mimic the fills used by his drummers in band situations, sometimes sending the fills back at the drummers faster than the drummers themselves could play them. This method is unique and should not be confused with the hammer-on tapping techniques of Eddie Van Halen and Stu Hamm or the slapping technique of Larry Graham, and in fact pre-dates these other techniques."

What I'm curious about is if he was tapping the strings in a sort of mini slap kind of way or if he was just tapping over a fret hard enough to constitute a note. Thanks in advance.
#3
Quote by 4string-tsurigi
sounds kinda like tapping...

I wasn't sure though, because it never specified whether it was over the fretboard or not, and if it was tapping I thought it would just go right our and say 'Entwistle pioneered the tapping technique'.
#4
4 finger tapping maybe?
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#5
...

Bass guitar magazine reader?

I think he just hit his fingers against the string or something, instead of actually plucking them.
#6
Ok, youve never seen him playing live? (not at a concert but like on a movie.) He kinda taps/finger picks the strings on the bottom of the fretboard. Its not really tapping, and its hard to explain, but thats as good as I could do.
#7
Quote by TomServo

" This method is unique and should not be confused with the hammer-on tapping techniques of Eddie Van Halen and Stu Hamm or the slapping technique of Larry Graham, and in fact pre-dates these other techniques."


...
#8
Quote by amorebelladonna
Ok, youve never seen him playing live? (not at a concert but like on a movie.) He kinda taps/finger picks the strings on the bottom of the fretboard. Its not really tapping, and its hard to explain, but thats as good as I could do.
kinda like slapping, nut he's poking the strings?
#9
Quote by grimreaper65
...

Bass guitar magazine reader?

I think he just hit his fingers against the string or something, instead of actually plucking them.

Not really, I spend some time trying to expand technique and I just came across a video of him and learned about the typewriter technique, and I figured if it can mimick drum fills faster than a drummer can sometimes play them, it's a technique worth learning.
#10
Quote by amorebelladonna
Ok, youve never seen him playing live? (not at a concert but like on a movie.) He kinda taps/finger picks the strings on the bottom of the fretboard. Its not really tapping, and its hard to explain, but thats as good as I could do.

Is it like, thrusting your fingers down and then pulling off fast enough to create a snap effect on the strings to produce a pre-fretted note with the other hand?
#11
i know what your talking about, but its hard to describe. he kinda positions his hand at the very bottom of the frettboard and kindof hooks his fingers when he strikes and pulls through. its deffinately not tappoing, he doesnt make contact with the frettboard. its more of a fieldy like technique, where he just hits the string hard, except he pulls the string sideways and his fingers slip off instead of smashing the string down against the pup.
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#12
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uwz8GeLcPs


check that out
watch his fingers
he kinna does it like geezer does
he plays close to the fretboard to generator more speed because his fingers hafta move less kinna

the strings are closer to something right? ( the strings are a shorter distance away from the fretoboard than anywhere else) so it takes less effort
and he uses al 4 fingers
its intense
and he also does a percusive tap type thing but i dont think that what wikipedia was quoting
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Last edited by Lowend at Sep 22, 2006,
#13
Basically what he's doing is playing with 4 fingers on his right hand to be able to play those fast passages that no one had done before. For the most part he was playing right over the end of the fretboard. If you've ever played your bass there you should notice that the strings will kinda slap the fretboard if you pluck the string hard enough. In no way is he slapping or tapping. He's just playing with 4 fingers over the end of the fretboard where he can get the strings to hit the fretboard and create a slight percussive sound.
#14
Quote by yEsTeRdAy`
Basically what he's doing is playing with 4 fingers on his right hand to be able to play those fast passages that no one had done before. For the most part he was playing right over the end of the fretboard. If you've ever played your bass there you should notice that the strings will kinda slap the fretboard if you pluck the string hard enough. In no way is he slapping or tapping. He's just playing with 4 fingers over the end of the fretboard where he can get the strings to hit the fretboard and create a slight percussive sound.

I think I understand now, thank you, but I think I might need a better bass (Or newer strings) because when I get to the higher string, it becomes highly difficult to get the percussive twangy noise because they're so thin.
#15
well the closest thing i can compare it to is how wooten slaps but it goes through the string giving it that clicky tone, same here.
#17
octave slap. Ryan Martinie does it to. Hit the note with your finger tips on your right hand, 12 frets higher than the bass note. should produce two notes at once.