#1
Ok i have two questions, 1st, if i was to run a Compression/Sustainer AFTER a Noise Suppressor (sp?) would that eliminate the sustain problem people talk about with NS'?

And also can someone explain an effects loop to me, i have heard explainations that delay pedals need to be in a loop if your going to distort them...i don't get it. Is it the same with a Flanger (just bought one, new to this whole effects thing.) hopefully you can help me, cos im lost.

Mitch
Quote by heartbreaker101
Yeah emo is more depressing because you know that you'll never get that wasted time back
#2
Your first question I cannot answer because I'm not too familiar with Compression or Noise-Gate pedals. Your second question I can answer though. An effects loop is pretty much what it sounds like, it's all your effect pedals (except wah, distortion, and equilizer) looped together and plugged into your amp directly, instead of passing through your guitar. The idea behind the effect loop is to save your tone if you're using more than one pedal, because the more pedals you have connected between your guitar and your amp, the worse your tone gets.
#3
is there an example of this i can see anywhere? i think i understand though, so for example, you have you guitar running into your wah, then dist. then into say a delay, flanger, NS, comp. what-not, then back out of your dist. pedal to your amp?
Quote by heartbreaker101
Yeah emo is more depressing because you know that you'll never get that wasted time back
#5
What i am trying to do is just run some pedals. Iv only got a couple now, but id like to know this before i go buy ing more, i have a Wah, then Flanger, and at the moment im using the amps distortion, but im after a pedal for that (it sucks), also looking at a delay, what do i need to do to make this sound "good" as in not muddy or drowned, i saw something before that said dont distort a flange signal, flange a distorted signal...Do you know what im trying to say?
Quote by heartbreaker101
Yeah emo is more depressing because you know that you'll never get that wasted time back
#6
Yeah, basically flanger after distortion. But because you're using your amp's distortion, you can't run the flanger after it, unless your amp has an effect loop. If it has, run your flanger in that. Keep your compressor and wah in front of the amp. I'm not sure about the NS-2.
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#7
ok sweet, i was gettin myself confused over not alot i think... So what do you suggest i do with my Flanger until i get my dist.?
Thanks man. (doesnt have an effects loop)
Quote by heartbreaker101
Yeah emo is more depressing because you know that you'll never get that wasted time back
#8
All you can do it just bare with it before distortion. Untill you get a distortion pedal that you can run into the clean channel on your amp.
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#9
Sweet, Thanks man.
Peace
Quote by heartbreaker101
Yeah emo is more depressing because you know that you'll never get that wasted time back
#10
Quote by JimPlaysGuitar
Where is this loop, on an amp? or on a pedal? Sick Boy is a n00b.


No, you're just an idiot. I clearly stated that the effect loop is on the back of most amps.
#11
And I clearly know that you shouldn't put all effects in the loop, and putting them in front will not make anything sound worse. Effects like wah, distortion and overdrive should be at the front. And nothing "passes through your guitar" exept clean signal.
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#12
Quote by Sick_Boy
Your first question I cannot answer because I'm not too familiar with Compression or Noise-Gate pedals. Your second question I can answer though. An effects loop is pretty much what it sounds like, it's all your effect pedals (except wah, distortion, and equilizer) looped together and plugged into your amp directly, instead of passing through your guitar. The idea behind the effect loop is to save your tone if you're using more than one pedal, because the more pedals you have connected between your guitar and your amp, the worse your tone gets.


Tone is subjective, and there are some that prefer having all of their effects plugged into the front end of the amp. The main reason for the effects loop on amplifiers is to give the player the option of utilizing the amplifier's gain stages to their preference. A flanger in front of the preamp will take the effect and "step it up" through the various gain stages (depending on the amplifier and channel), so instead of the amplified signal being flanged, the flanger is now being amplified. This allows a player to actually use the flanger effect for lead, since the flanger's level can now overdrive the preamp slightly. The same can be said for other effects as well. Now, a compressor in the effects loop will take your amplified signal from the preamp and tighten it up, which isn't entirely bad. The only drawback you might find is that any noise or buzz generated by an overdriven preamp will also be compressed, but if you're simply using the compressor to boost your tones that have a little less energy (lightly picked phrases for example) then placing the compressor in the loop isn't really such a bad idea. If you crank the compressor's threshold to boost a wider array of those "lighter" sounds, then you're more than likely going to boost the hum and noise from the amp. Placing the noise suppressor in front of the compressor in the effects loop should reduce this. Just adjust the noise suppressor so that is just starts to take out some of the hiss in the sound and leave it alone...if it's too tight, it will squash some of the natural dynamics of your sound (but that can also be a cool effect on it's own).

If you want examples of some players that plug everything into the front end of their amp, Mike Einzinger from Incubus is probably the best example I can come up with right now, but there are others.