#1
hey...i was always taught that the lowest note in a chord is its root note n therefore the note from which the chord gets its name. This brings me to slash chords...2x0232 is known as D/F# but by the way i was taught it would be a F#m+5. So, my question is...when is a chord a slash chord and when does it take the name of its root note? Is it just a slash chord when its a shorter, easier name or is there a more theoretical reason?
#2
a slash chord is just an inversion. The notes in that chord are exactly the notes in a D major chord, so it's a D, but the F# is in the bass. We write D/F# to mean exactly that. The lowest note in a chord is NOT the root, that's just what it is a majority of the time.
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#3
Who taught you that the lowest note in a chord is its root? They were very wrong.
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#4
Quote by sirpsycho85
a slash chord is just an inversion.

nope.
An inversion would suggest the notes of a chord arranged in a different order.
If you had C major, you have the notes C E G. If you wanted to put a random bass note, say G# (Ab) then that note (g#) doesnt appear in the C major chord, so it cant possibly be an inversion, unless you called that particular chord C(add #12) which looks horrible.


threadstarter:

the lowest note isnt always the root note, but most times it is.

for example, slash chords could have two names, one with the lowest note as the root, and one with the lowest note as a bass note.

Sometimes it depends how it fits into a chord progression as well. If you have a series of chords, and you knew your theory, you would want to give a chord a specific root note that may not even be the lowest note played.

In your example, If that was the only chord being played, id prefer to call it D/F# rather than F#m+5 simply because, "D slash F sharp" is easier to say than "F sharp minor augmented 5th"
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#5
but it really is an inversion of Cadd#12 (although it'd likely be a b13). Maybe i should reword...a C/something chord is not necessarily an inversion of a plain Cmajor chord, but the reason for the slash is that something that is in the chord you play that is not the root is in the bass, which is an inversion. It just might be the inversion of something more complicated than the plain C chord. yeah, the way i said it was misleading. it's technically true that it is an inversion, but not necessarily of exactly what comes before the slash.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
Last edited by sirpsycho85 at Sep 23, 2006,
#6
Quote by Logz
nope.
An inversion would suggest the notes of a chord arranged in a different order.
If you had C major, you have the notes C E G. If you wanted to put a random bass note, say G# (Ab) then that note (g#) doesnt appear in the C major chord, so it cant possibly be an inversion, unless you called that particular chord C(add #12) which looks horrible.


threadstarter:

the lowest note isnt always the root note, but most times it is.

for example, slash chords could have two names, one with the lowest note as the root, and one with the lowest note as a bass note.

Sometimes it depends how it fits into a chord progression as well. If you have a series of chords, and you knew your theory, you would want to give a chord a specific root note that may not even be the lowest note played.

In your example, If that was the only chord being played, id prefer to call it D/F# rather than F#m+5 simply because, "D slash F sharp" is easier to say than "F sharp minor augmented 5th"


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#7
^ well i wasnt disagreeing with the general ideas there, and they help people understand what is going on. but a slash puts something that isn't the root into the bass, making it an inverision. saying they can have multiple names depending on what you want to consider the root would be true not only of slash chords.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

Know any good teachers in NY, especially skilled in teaching ear training? Tell me
#8
"inversion" = a chord tone other then the root (usually the third or fifth) is the lowest note

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inversion_%28music%29

vs. slash chords: you can put anything under the slash, doesn't have to be one of the chord tones.

for example, E/A (below) A is not one of the chord tones normally found in E (E G# B)

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