#3
Erm... Theoretically (sp) "blues" bands would be bands that use the twelve bar blues in there songs, and base their solos around the minor pentatonic scale.
#5
12 bar blues is like you play 12 bars of chords in a pattern. The pattern is always:
1 (4 bars)
4 (2 bars)
1 (2 bars)
5 (1 bar)
4 (1 bar)
1 (1 bar)
5 (1 bar)

In the key of E, the 1 would represent E major, the 4 A major, and the 5 B major

Thats an awkward (note the euphemism) question man, I can;t help but say it.
#6
to paraphrase wikipedia's opening paragraph, some telling aspects are a repetitive, often 12 bar, pattern of chords focusing on the I IV and V. The blues scale means you are going to get the #4 blue note, as well as a clash between the minor and major third, and a flatted seventh. there is a lot of call and response in blues, and the lyrics are often but certainly not always melancholy or raw. shuffle rhythm is generally present. not my favorite genre, but really listn to like 5 blues songs and you will have answered your question. very easy to pick out.
"I see my light come shining from the west down to the east
Any day now, any day now I shall be released"

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Last edited by sirpsycho85 at Sep 23, 2006,
#8
^^Why do people always say AC/DC as opposed to, oh I don't know, maybe a Blues band, in response to this sort of question?

I don't think anyone said this, but the chords used are generally dominant chords, that is to say that they contain the root, major third and minor seventh. If the root of the chord was E, for example, this would mean that it contained E, G# and D.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

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A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#10
Quote by Jaffaps2
Music with a b5th?


The riff to Enter Sandman uses the flattened fifth. Blues?
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#11
b5's work with dominants pretty well because of the tritone that exists between its 3rd and 7th.
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#12
Man, people spurting all this **** about theory don't really know much at all about music. Blues is a genre of music which originated from African slaves/labourers in America. To get 'the blues' is to experience something in your life which causes you to be sad or down, which can be conveyed through the music of blues. You can also play about something good or a happy moment. Listen to Robert Johnson, T-Bone Walker and also 'modern' artists like B.B. King, Albert King, Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to understand the genre.

Musically the structure is nearly always 12 bars, hence the term '12 bar blues', which is usually 3 chords set over the 12 bars.

Most rock and roll is blues influenced, e.g. Led Zeppelin.

Get into this genre as its the most important genre you can play on a guitar, which everyone can relate to.
#13
Quote by Jaffaps2
Music with a b5th?


dude.

like every genre of music has a flatted fifth.

Quote by tryhardslash
dude like every song has disortion

and its called distorting
#15
Just look it up at Wikipedia. You won't get any useful answers here. You'll have one group of people saying Blues is something you have to have, you can't describe it in theory and another group who'll give you the 12-bar-blues scheme with a minor pentatonic and added b5th speech. Both are equally wrong (or right if you wish to say so).
- When I was your age Pluto was still a Planet. - anonymous
#16
the added b5th thing is total bulls hit.
Quote by tryhardslash
dude like every song has disortion

and its called distorting
#17
^^Not exactly, 'coz it's used a helluva lot in blues, hence is often described as the 'blue note'. But hey, it's also been described as the note of the devil (I'm really not making this up!)
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#18
step 1: learn the blues scale.

step 2: play


you dont NEED to have some huge anguish to play the blues... and neither do u need to know a bunch of theory.... just play it 0_0;
"A one that is not cold is barely a one at all!"
#19
You can't truly appreciate the blues just by reading a Wikipedia diction. Go to the Blues & Jazz forum and look through the Blues Artist Thread to find some artists and listen to them. A great deal of rock music is influenced by blues, and certaintly uses many of the same scales.
#20
AC/DC is a rock band. The thing is though that some people dont understand that blues music is very distinct in tone and notation. Bands like AC/DC are rock but use the minor pentatonic scales. You can clearly see this in Hell's bells and other songs like that.

Metallica's solos are not strictly blues but they use forms and figures of minor and sometimes even Major pentatonics. Pentatonic scales are used in many styles but it is a bluesy thing.

Blues in tone is based around most times a low distortion level, 12th bars, pentatonic scales, and 7th chords. Chords mainly popularized in blues are E7, A7, B7, and sometimes Bm7.
#21
Quote by madmk
Man, people spurting all this **** about theory don't really know much at all about music. Blues is a genre of music which originated from African slaves/labourers in America. To get 'the blues' is to experience something in your life which causes you to be sad or down, which can be conveyed through the music of blues. You can also play about something good or a happy moment. Listen to Robert Johnson, T-Bone Walker and also 'modern' artists like B.B. King, Albert King, Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan to understand the genre.

Musically the structure is nearly always 12 bars, hence the term '12 bar blues', which is usually 3 chords set over the 12 bars.

Most rock and roll is blues influenced, e.g. Led Zeppelin.

Get into this genre as its the most important genre you can play on a guitar, which everyone can relate to.


And why does having not mentioned the history of the music mean someone knows sh*t about it? If they can play it then they know it. Everyone who plays Blues, regardless of whether they know the words to describe it, knows the theory behind Blues, ergo it is vital for your ability to play. Hendrix and Vaughan wouldn't know what a dominant chord was, but that doesn't mean that knowing the correct phraseology somehow demeans your standing as a blues player. Furthermore, when describing a style over the internet, just how the f*ck else am I gonna explain it? If I had a guitar in my hands and he was sitting here then I'd just play the Blues until he got the idea, as it is I'm reduced to using written language, but what else would you recommend?

Incidentally, anyone else find it amusing that "UG's Board King" needed to ask what the Blues were?
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#22
Quote by Strat_Monkey
And why does having not mentioned the history of the music mean someone knows sh*t about it? If they can play it then they know it. Everyone who plays Blues, regardless of whether they know the words to describe it, knows the theory behind Blues, ergo it is vital for your ability to play. Hendrix and Vaughan wouldn't know what a dominant chord was, but that doesn't mean that knowing the correct phraseology somehow demeans your standing as a blues player. Furthermore, when describing a style over the internet, just how the f*ck else am I gonna explain it? If I had a guitar in my hands and he was sitting here then I'd just play the Blues until he got the idea, as it is I'm reduced to using written language, but what else would you recommend?

Incidentally, anyone else find it amusing that "UG's Board King" needed to ask what the Blues were?



You win teh Internets!
"A one that is not cold is barely a one at all!"
#23
Quote by S_C_L-1
You win teh Internets!


I'm going to assume that's good because if I assumed it was bad I'd have to go in to yet another long-arse rant and I'm too tired for that sh*t
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#24
You seemed to forget the point of me describing basically what blues is, and not how its played on a guitar. If someone asked what metal was, you'd outline some key bands and what defined the genre.

The guy didn't say wether or not he wanted to know how to implement the style on a guitar or the genre itself. Its his fault.
#25
rather than assume what he was asking, maybe ask him what he wants to know or give both... so now he knows the origins AND the basic structure... dont need to escalate it into a flamme war...

I'm going to assume that's good because if I assumed it was bad I'd have to go in to yet another long-arse rant and I'm too tired for that sh*t


it would only be a bad thing if i was sarcastic... (i wasnt)
"A one that is not cold is barely a one at all!"
#26
Quote by st.jimmy4091680
Acdc has some blues in it

Die.


I think these guys have described blues pretty well..so I wont bother.
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