#1
Ok so I've been playing guitar for 2-3 years now and this is what I've learned over those years in terms of music theory.

-Intervals
-Steps, Tones
-Major Scale
-Natural Minor Scale
-Harmonic Minor Scale
-Melodic Minor Scale
-Jazz Minor Scale
-All my Major Scale modes
-Basic Chord Formulas (Major, Minor, Major 7th, Minor 7th, Dominant 7th, Diminished 7th, Half Diminished 7th, sus2, sus4)
-I can sight read bass clef and I can read treble clef
-Minor, Major Pentatonic Scales

Just basic stuff like that is what I've been using for a while now. I then asked myself "What else can I learn about music theory?". So, I'm on UG asking my fellow guitar players what I should learn or what I could learn about music theory in the next couple months. Please be specific
#2
If you ask me, that's plenty! Did you know that some famous musicians don't know that much? Anyway, I suggest you get down to songs now rather than scales etc. They should come in great use.
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#3
Wow. I can't believe I could get nearly this far if I hadn't learned a bunch of theory.

Yes I've learned a ton of songs. But thanks for the suggestion! They really do teach you a lot don't they?

And thanks for the other suggestion. I've learned the two bottom strings (E, A) but not the rest. I'll start working on that!
#5
thats alot you'v learned if you ask me.
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#6
do you have a private teacher or something? im having trouble trying to find a teacher/academy
#7
just learn licks, build your lick library up, make some of your own, start a band even, you know enough theory to get by for problably forever
but first watch some hendrix on you tube, problably machene gun and vodoo chile, and see how he tears the notes from his soul, every fiber of his being screams that one note, learn how to do that, then you will be a musician.. remember anyone can learn theory, but to actually have tallent, thats a true musician.
#9
Well, that's nice. You memorized a number of scales. All well and good. But,
how well do you really know them? Can you play all of them up and down the
neck? Can you arpeggiate all of them? Do you know how to use them in various
contexts?

The initial memorization is really only a small first step. Probably just about anyone
could memorize all those scales in at least 1 finger position in a week or less. But,
actually using them and being able to see patterns and connections between
scales and chords can take many many years to learn.

Since you know all those scales, I'd highly recommend the book "Sheets of Sound".
An excellent book that will take you though all kinds of scale patterns up & down
the neck that will take what you know about scales to another level.
#10
Take the scales you already know and get to know how they relate to each other. The best soloists never, ever use the same scale throughout an entire solo, they switch it up to keep things fresh. The simplest example is relative and parallel majors and minors (for example: C major and A minor have the same exact notes. A minor is the relative minor of C major. A minor is also the parallel minor of A major, because they have the same root note). Expand that knowledge to other modes like Lydian and Mixolydian and then you'll really be cooking. It will also help your song writing skills tremendously, because who wants to hear a song where every new section is in the same key (actually a lot of people do, but we musicians should rise above that radio-friendly song formula).
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#11
Quote by yEsTeRdAy`
Ok so I've been playing guitar for 2-3 years now and this is what I've learned over those years in terms of music theory.

-Intervals
-Steps, Tones
-Major Scale
-Natural Minor Scale
-Harmonic Minor Scale
-Melodic Minor Scale
-Jazz Minor Scale
-All my Major Scale modes
-Basic Chord Formulas (Major, Minor, Major 7th, Minor 7th, Dominant 7th, Diminished 7th, Half Diminished 7th, sus2, sus4)
-I can sight read bass clef and I can read treble clef
-Minor, Major Pentatonic Scales

Just basic stuff like that is what I've been using for a while now. I then asked myself "What else can I learn about music theory?". So, I'm on UG asking my fellow guitar players what I should learn or what I could learn about music theory in the next couple months. Please be specific

Um i dunno if ug is the best place to ask this since i dont think theres that many theory based folk here but you could possibly learn the modes of the harmonic minor and melodic minor scales. And kudos you already know more than me (not hard) lol.
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#12
Thanks for all the reply's!

Mongoose87 : Writing is definitely a skill I need to work on. Thanks for the other suggestion. My band needs to play some originals now and I'm at a loss at how I'm going to teach my drummer what I want him to play...

brandooon : I actually don't and never have had a private teacher before. So I guess you could call me self taught? But I don't like using that term cause you're never completely "self taught".

For a teacher I suggest going to a local music store and seeing if there are any bulletins posted about guitar teachers. Or maybe call up a local university if they have some kind of music program and ask around there.

sempri_fi : I've been practicing licks and such for a while now. But yes I try my best to be soulful and all

OldRocker : Caged System? I should check that out. Thanks for the suggestion!

edg : Would you mind showing me an article or tab of a bunch of different positions for basic scales? Maybe some basic arpeggio's? And mind explaining the various contexts?

rockxwl : "The best soloists never, ever use the same scale throughout an entire solo"....Next time, state that as an opinion and not a fact.


Anyways, thanks again for all the reply's!
#13
Quote by yEsTeRdAy`


edg : Would you mind showing me an article or tab of a bunch of different positions for basic scales? Maybe some basic arpeggio's? And mind explaining the various contexts?


All I can say again is "Sheets of Sound". The most comprehensive book of
scale patterns I have seen. It will help you to see patterns up and down the
entire neck and make all kinds of connections. Additionaly, it's a great workout
for fingering and picking. It has everything in tab & standard notation.

A context is something like this: Your practice the harmonic minor and notice the
3rd mode looks a lot like a maj7 -- includes the 1,3,5,7 arpeggio. This gives
you a clue the 3rd mode harmonic minor might make a great substition scale
over a maj7. And it does.
#14
I envy your knowledge.

I suggest you get a backing band and maybe start a band. If your playing ability follows up your knowledge then you'll be good to go.

Good luck.
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#16
Congratulations on knowing the basics.

Hows your ear? You say you know modes, but can you use them to improvise over a given chord progression? Can you compose? Do you know all the key signatures and time signatures? Can you count well? Jazz minor is the same as melodic minor which is the same as the dorian mode. Are you sure you know what you're talking about? You list scales, but what relevance are they to you? Do you have them memorized flawlessly up the board and can you apply them? Applications are key.