#2
here ya go, i'm really hoping yer a noob if yer asking these questions (sorry i don't know how to make code work)


**D5**E5*B5*C#5*A5*G5
D--7---------4----6-----2------
A--5----2---2----4-----0----5----
E--------0---------------------3----
#3
thanx. not really. ive been playin for 6 months. i just dont know anythings names. i can do eruption, sweet child o mine, ride the lightning, deuce, god of thunder, and a bunch of really tight songs like that, i just dont know the names of the power chords. im fixin to go to my michelle, and it was just listed as letters, so i didnt really knwo....thanks dude.
#4
Here it is coded you you.

**D5****E5**B5*C#5****A5***G5
D--7--------4----6-----2------
A--5----2---2----4-----0----5----
E-------0-------------------3----


Now let me explain how power chords are formed so you can figure them out by yourself.

The letter at the beginning (or letter with a sharp or flat) is the root. The 5 tells you that it is a power chord. So D5 is a D power chord, Gb5 is a Gb power chord, and G#5 is a G# power chord. To form a power chord (this will only work with the root on the E, A D, or B string), play a note. That note is the root. On the next string higher (in pitch, A--->D) play the note two frets higher than the root. This note is the fifth. Power chords contain only the root and the fifth, hence them being called 5 chords. They aren't really chords, but rather intervals. Regarldess, we call them power chords. Power chords can become more complex as you add additional fifths and octaves, but that is the basics.

Just remember that there is usually more than one way to play a chord. It is up to you to decide which is best, either by which is easier to switch to or which is in the right octave.
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Here it is coded you you.

**D5****E5**B5*C#5****A5***G5
D--7--------4----6-----2------
A--5----2---2----4-----0----5----
E-------0-------------------3----


Now let me explain how power chords are formed so you can figure them out by yourself.

The letter at the beginning (or letter with a sharp or flat) is the root. The 5 tells you that it is a power chord. So D5 is a D power chord, Gb5 is a Gb power chord, and G#5 is a G# power chord. To form a power chord (this will only work with the root on the E, A D, or B string), play a note. That note is the root. On the next string higher (in pitch, A--->D) play the note two frets higher than the root. This note is the fifth. Power chords contain only the root and the fifth, hence them being called 5 chords. They aren't really chords, but rather intervals. Regarldess, we call them power chords. Power chords can become more complex as you add additional fifths and octaves, but that is the basics.

Just remember that there is usually more than one way to play a chord. It is up to you to decide which is best, either by which is easier to switch to or which is in the right octave.

0_o
wow. thank you. i saved this to my microsoft word!
#6
Oh!

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=32021

This might be more than you want to know and I may have already said it (I skimmed it), but this is an archived thread on power chords.
#7
wonderful, thanks for coding that for me BGC, i was just trying to get it thru quickly, btw how do you code something ?
#8
Quote by z4twenny
wonderful, thanks for coding that for me BGC, i was just trying to get it thru quickly, btw how do you code something ?
Quote me to find out.