#1
I already know about the hopscotch method and I'd like something better because the way it works is kinda confusing for me.
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#2
wtf is the hopscotch method?
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#3
i have no idea what the hopscotch method is but just keep playing it, eventually you'll memorize it
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#4
define this hopscotch method lol
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#5
Quote by thepagesaretorn
define this hopscotch method lol


I guess I was wrong in assuming that most of you guys knew the hopscotch method. Heres the link for the lesson>>> http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/hopscotch_method_part_1.html
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#6
Just learn the whole thing one position at a time. So learn the first position, then practice soloing with just that for a couple days, then learn the second, and work on that one, then combine them, then move onto the third etc.
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#7
The best answer is to learn the notes; how the scale is based off of the major scale. That way you won't rely on patterns. Just practice in different octaves, and lower or higher strings, and learn where the roots are. Then other scales will be a lot easier to learn.
#8
hopscoth method is cool..but its pretty much a 1 dimension method of learning scales right? i mean cos there are so many scales to learn, phrygian, mixolydian.... i guess soon after you gotta create ur own hopscotch method.. i know that Vai simply memorises everything!!!...literally.. he knows every note on that fretboard, he knows every note in every scale..but its all besauce of hard work and a lot of practise,about 9 hrs a day in his prime... Yngwie I know for sure would agree with learning things the hard way. but theres is one other way that might be come good for ya... u can try learning scales using the Linear method.. heard of it? maybe you should do some research on this... or lemme just give a brief explanation of it.. well..its pretty simple.. all you do is learn a scale one string at a time, each string, each scale..sounds challenging but worth it.. i know Satriani used this method to learn as well.. its tough but it really helps if youre the type of player who prefers to improvise, and i mean improvise with really strong melodies (just like Satch music), and not just whack on a few notes real quick together.. try it.. you'll see what i mean..

good luck, hope it helped...
#9
Quote by Dayn
The best answer is to learn the notes; how the scale is based off of the major scale. That way you won't rely on patterns. Just practice in different octaves, and lower or higher strings, and learn where the roots are. Then other scales will be a lot easier to learn.

I really strongly agree with that.

Learning scale patterns is a matter of technique excersize; that's really all they're good for. Understanding the relationships of notes musically... ie. knowing your intervals, knowing what's in what key, etc, and knowing them on the fretboard, is, IMO, far more important.

It really hurts your playing, especially your improv, to think in terms of scale patterns (motifs are the exception), instead of thinking in concrete notes. I'd much rather have a player who knows what note they're playing right this second, what note they'd like to get to next, and where to find it; rather than someone who knows patterns and can just play in key all day.

That probably makes a lot more sense when you realize that, honestly, scales for the sake of scales are pretty worthless, musically. (Which is why there are so many people wanting help with trying to get out of just playing scales when they solo, or "breaking out" of a certain pattern/position). When you start to think in terms of concrete notes, and how they relate to the chords being played, you really gain full access over the fretboard.
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#11
just a question, what if... WHAT IF, im the kind of player who doesnt know what note im playing but know what sound that the note makes instead? like for example, I know a certain note i wanna play, just say 15th fret, and i want to bend it to a 17th fret, cos i know it will suit my solo, what would you say about that? Basically i know that knowing all the notes on the fretboard is best, but what do you have to say about playing it by listening and playing what you feel is right for the solo???
#12
Quote by Corwinoid
I really strongly agree with that.

Learning scale patterns is a matter of technique excersize; that's really all they're good for. Understanding the relationships of notes musically... ie. knowing your intervals, knowing what's in what key, etc, and knowing them on the fretboard, is, IMO, far more important.

It really hurts your playing, especially your improv, to think in terms of scale patterns (motifs are the exception), instead of thinking in concrete notes. I'd much rather have a player who knows what note they're playing right this second, what note they'd like to get to next, and where to find it; rather than someone who knows patterns and can just play in key all day.

That probably makes a lot more sense when you realize that, honestly, scales for the sake of scales are pretty worthless, musically. (Which is why there are so many people wanting help with trying to get out of just playing scales when they solo, or "breaking out" of a certain pattern/position). When you start to think in terms of concrete notes, and how they relate to the chords being played, you really gain full access over the fretboard.


That is so true. By using scale patterns, it's easy to improvise over simple rythm guitars in rock, pop and blues. However, I belive we have 2 problems with this technique:

1. You often get some "usual" riffs in these scales that you tend to use too often, resulting in many of your solos will sound the same.

2. If you want to make some of the really interesting solos, you have to (in my opinion) improvise over the actual chord, instead of one single scale. By using those scale patterns, it's hard to readjust from one chord to another.