#2
diatonic just means all the notes are related to the key, with no outside notes.
#3
Diatonic means a seven-note scale. We generally use it to describe the major scale, the harmonic minor scale, the melodic minor scale, and all of their modes.
#5
and chromatic is all of the notes....A, A#/Bb, B, C, C#/Db, D, D#/Eb, E, F, F#/Gb, G, G#/Ab....
#9
diatonic, hmm

for example, Ab is diatonic to G

as G# is chromatic to G


*edit
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Last edited by Remebol at Sep 27, 2006,
#10
ummm... F# is diatonic to G. Fb only exists in B diminished

But yeah, you pretty much got it. Chromatic actually means that a run or group of notes ascend/descend in half steps.
#12
^The last one should be

Ab Bb C Db Eb F G Ab

That's the Ab Major diatonic scale. The key of Ab has 4 flats.

Diatonic just refers to "being in the key" as was stated previously. That's all there is to it.
#13
Quote by Johnljones7443
A diatonic scale refers to a seven note scale comprised of 5 whole tones and 2 semi tones.


Almost

The 2 semi tones must be maximally separated.

Basically it means what's commonly referred to as the major scale and it's modes.
So diatonic is NOT: harmonic minor, melodic minor, diminished, etc.... It's ONLY
the major scale.

The origins of the diatonic scale are actually pretty interesting.

Ancient scales were 4 note scales (tetrachords) comprised of 3 distinct notes with
the formula: W W H. At some point, a longer scale was desired. So 2 of those
scales were stuck together seperated by a whole tone: W W H W W W H. The
modern diatonic. You can find symmetries between the upper and lower halfs
of the scale if you look for them.
#14
Quote by edg
Almost

The 2 semi tones must be maximally separated.

Basically it means what's commonly referred to as the major scale and it's modes.
So diatonic is NOT: harmonic minor, melodic minor, diminished, etc.... It's ONLY
the major scale.

The origins of the diatonic scale are actually pretty interesting.

Ancient scales were 4 note scales (tetrachords) comprised of 3 distinct notes with
the formula: W W H. At some point, a longer scale was desired. So 2 of those
scales were stuck together seperated by a whole tone: W W H W W W H. The
modern diatonic. You can find symmetries between the upper and lower halfs
of the scale if you look for them.

That's partly wrong. From the top down... I would considert he melodic minor diatonic-literal, as well as the natural minor.

More importantly though, the last paragraph is flat wrong. Ancient scales were hexatonic, having 6 tones, not four. The concept of the tetrachord is a relatively late, 18th century, idea that makes explaining the major scale simpler; however it's artificial.

The literal for diatonic -- two tone -- refers literally to a scales two semi-tones, and the opposing tendencies they create. If I weren't in a time crunch I'd go into it more, but I've posted on this fairly recently, and most of you are smart enough to use the search feature.
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