#1
how do i change the key of a song and still have that chords progression in it or however id say it. like if i wanted to change say what i got. d to g all the song. how would i change that to the key of a. or something like free fallin key of a to the key of g. anyone know what im talking about
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#2
even though you asked so eloquently, no I don't understand.

Sorry. But seriously, changing keys is actually pretty easy and will only get easier the more you do it and the more you learn about theory. If you are doing a D to G progression, just going to an A from the G chord should sound just fine. For starters you'll probably want to learn by changing to keys that have most of the notes of the previous key. Example: shift from D major to B minor or G major.

This may not all make sense to you, but just mess around and decide on what you think sounds good and it will all fall into place eventually.
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#3
It's fairly simple.

Write out letters A-G twice in a row to represent your chords. Then map the current progression. For example, a I IV V progression in the key of A.

A B C D E F G A B C D E F G

Here, A = I (1st chord), D = IV (4th) and E = V (5th).

Say you want to change it to the key of D. Shift the entire progression forward so that the first chord is D:

A B C D E F G A B C D E F G

Now, D = I (1st chord), G = IV (4th) and A = V (5th). So, the original progression (I IV V) is preserved, but you are now in the key of D. Basically, you just need to remember the relationship between the chords in a progression and then shift it along the scale.

Of course, not all progressions are I IV V, but the concept is still the same.

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#4
Quote by Armored Artist
It's fairly simple.

Write out letters A-G twice in a row to represent your chords. Then map the current progression. For example, a I IV V progression in the key of A.

A B C D E F G A B C D E F G

Here, A = I (1st chord), D = IV (4th) and E = V (5th).

Say you want to change it to the key of D. Shift the entire progression forward so that the first chord is D:

A B C D E F G A B C D E F G

Now, D = I (1st chord), G = IV (4th) and A = V (5th). So, the original progression (I IV V) is preserved, but you are now in the key of D. Basically, you just need to remember the relationship between the chords in a progression and then shift it along the scale.

Of course, not all progressions are I IV V, but the concept is still the same.


Good example.

It's called transposing. I do that a lot just to make it interesting. Good exercises too.
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#5
A prime example of how to achieve the knowledge even quicker above ^^
I have learned to transpose without any theory, but it took longer than it should have. After you've played for a while, you'll get the feel of it either method you go with.