#1
What is the best order of learning music theory to a basic level? Not talking reading or notation just pure theory-there are a few different opinions on what comes first-

Eg:-
Chromatic Scale or Major Scale-chromatic easier to see but more difficult to understand than major scale-and major scale can go straight to///
Interval Steps or Specific Intervals..specific intervals are easy to understand eg minor 2nd jaws.

Any help much appreciated
#2
Quote by Mahavishnu80
What is the best order of learning music theory to a basic level? Not talking reading or notation just pure theory-there are a few different opinions on what comes first-

Eg:-
Chromatic Scale or Major Scale-chromatic easier to see but more difficult to understand than major scale-and major scale can go straight to///
Interval Steps or Specific Intervals..specific intervals are easy to understand eg minor 2nd jaws.

Any help much appreciated
By choosing to neglect reading and notation you're significantly limiting yourself. I can't imagine why you'd do this, as reading standard notation for the purposes of learning theory is actually quite straightforward. In any case, what you're describing is an ear-training approach. This will carry you only so far. Learning the theory associated with chromaticism, for example, is far beyond an ear-training approach.

Perhaps you're thinking learning theory and ear-training are the same things?
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#3
Quote by gpb0216
By choosing to neglect reading and notation you're significantly limiting yourself. I can't imagine why you'd do this, as reading standard notation for the purposes of learning theory is actually quite straightforward. In any case, what you're describing is an ear-training approach. This will carry you only so far. Learning the theory associated with chromaticism, for example, is far beyond an ear-training approach.

Perhaps you're thinking learning theory and ear-training are the same things?


i dont know why you replied thinking i want to negate reading-you are seeing words that are not on the page!

im not talking about myself personally-i can read notation-treble and bass clef and have done for years. Im talking generically-

would you study (or teach) the major scale and its related steps or the chromatic scale. Then after that would triads be next-just trying to find the chronological, most easy method. An example is Musictheory.net-they negate to explain the chromatic scale and introduce triads late on as well.


Anyone else?
#4
I would say, do something like this:

-Teach the notes and rhythmic notation (you're going to need whether or not the person wants to read or write notation)
- Use the chromatic scale to help learn the notes of the fretboard
- Use Major scale/ Major Chords
- Use natural Minor Scale / Minor Chords
- Use Harmonic Minor scale, then Melodic Minor
- If they can tackle that, then go onto 7th chords (Major, minor, Dominant, Half-dim., Fully dim.)

That should be enough from a very basic level to an advanced level.
Some of the most powerful moments are when there is nothing to be said
#5
Quote by Ocean's Rage
I would say, do something like this:

-Teach the notes and rhythmic notation (you're going to need whether or not the person wants to read or write notation)
- Use the chromatic scale to help learn the notes of the fretboard
- Use Major scale/ Major Chords
- Use natural Minor Scale / Minor Chords
- Use Harmonic Minor scale, then Melodic Minor
- If they can tackle that, then go onto 7th chords (Major, minor, Dominant, Half-dim., Fully dim.)

That should be enough from a very basic level to an advanced level.



thats really not what im on about either..nevermind!
#6
Quote by Mahavishnu80
i dont know why you replied thinking i want to negate reading-you are seeing words that are not on the page!
Didn't you specifically say, "Not talking reading or notation just pure theory"?
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.