#1
I'm building a custom guitar of my own design, and I want to have a chromed jackplate made.

Can anyone recommend someone that will custom machine and chrome a pickguard?

I've found places that do polished aluminum metal pickguards, but I don't like the look polished aluminum as much as chrome...

Continue to rock!
#2
do you want the jackplate or the pickguard chrome? you're using the words like they're interchangeable.
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#3
Well originally it was going to be a control plate with a jack in it, but I decided to put the jack on the side, and put a 3 way toggle where the jack would have been.

So I guess I'd be more of a control plate, I've you wanted to be technical.

Any suggestions...
#4
I would just find a nice, shiny piece of metal at a hardware store and cut it with metal sheers myself.

If I can find the site that did at least cutting out pickguards I'll throw that link in this post.

http://www.terrapinguitars.com/
Last edited by SuperAnalytical at Sep 28, 2006,
#5
sheers? are you nuts?

u'll have to go to two different places. rarely machinists will chrome plate their own parts. find someplace near you, there isnt much point in sending it away to get it done, unless you dont mind paying for shipping.
#7
true but the edge you get from sheers is twisted from the way the sheers cut the metal. you best bet at doign ti yourself is find someone with a bandsaw and a metal blade (or supply your own) and cut it that way and then clean up the edges with metal files and emory paper (metal sanding paper)
#8
Check with your local chopper (bike) shops about who they use for chrome. I've gotten all kinds of cool tips about fabricating and painting from them, and chroming one small part likely won't cost that much.

oh, yeah... You'll probably want a heavy enough piece of steel , aluminum, or whatever that shears won't work well. Use a jigsaw or bandsaw and a bench grinder. If you're doing some crazy detail like on "Traben" guitars, you'll need a good set of hand files too, unless you can afford to have someone program a CNC machine.

For quick, cheap parts, however, I've often used coffee cans. So I guess it boils down to how much you want to spend.
Last edited by ZootCst at Sep 29, 2006,
#9
Ever heard of people dying from getting shocked by guitars. Make sure if u do pput a metal pickguard on their, that ur guitar is properly grounded. Even then it is unsafe to play with something like that touching ur hands constantly.
Just want to heed a warning that's all.
#11
Quote by iHeart_LesPauls
Ever heard of people dying from getting shocked by guitars. Make sure if u do pput a metal pickguard on their, that ur guitar is properly grounded. Even then it is unsafe to play with something like that touching ur hands constantly.
Just want to heed a warning that's all.

You mean like strings? If you're gonna get fried, you're gonna get fried - the pickguard makes no difference.
Hi, I'm Peter
#12
Quote by iHeart_LesPauls
Ever heard of people dying from getting shocked by guitars. Make sure if u do pput a metal pickguard on their, that ur guitar is properly grounded. Even then it is unsafe to play with something like that touching ur hands constantly.
Just want to heed a warning that's all.


Erm, the p/g doesn't actually touch the electronics, so that's not gonna make a difference. Besides u get shocked all the time from ur guitar, the signal is grounded from the bridge which goes to the strings which touch ur hand, it's just the voltage is so small it doesn't affect u at all.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#13
Quote by eddiehimself
Erm, the p/g doesn't actually touch the electronics, so that's not gonna make a difference. Besides u get shocked all the time from ur guitar, the signal is grounded from the bridge which goes to the strings which touch ur hand, it's just the voltage is so small it doesn't affect u at all.

He's talking about a rare defect in tube amps - especially vintage ones - that can send a deadly jolt through your guitar. It's happened before, especially to people using microphones (the lips touching the mic completes the circuit). And whether your electronics touch the pickguard depends on whether your pickups are screwed into it or your pots are screwed into it.
Hi, I'm Peter
#14
Ok i suppose that's plausible, given the complexities of tube amp wiring but with a shock that big, it's not really gonna make much of a difference whether u have a metal or plastic p/g.
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#16
The shock problem isn't necessarily because of tube amps. It's mainly because of reversed polarity between the socket your amp is plugged into and the socket the PA is plugged into. You should always test wall sockets when you play a new venue to make sure it's wired correctly. Get yourself a cheap socket tester at any hardware store, or your friends might start calling you "Sparky".
#17
Quote by ZootCst
The shock problem isn't necessarily because of tube amps. It's mainly because of reversed polarity between the socket your amp is plugged into and the socket the PA is plugged into. You should always test wall sockets when you play a new venue to make sure it's wired correctly. Get yourself a cheap socket tester at any hardware store, or your friends might start calling you "Sparky".


So if they have the same polarity, then you wont get shocked?
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