#1
I'm trying to learn to shred but I just can't get there So what should I be doing? I've heard that playing to a metronome and increasing the tempo every so often is often successful, but if I did that, what do you guys advise to play with the metronome?
#3
Okay, thanks. I will give it a shot. A while ago I learnt a bit of the intro but then it got a bit too fast. Hopefully I will get it this time since I have improved a fair bit.

Anyone else got any tips?
#4
Yes, learn Master of Puppets, it will help condition your pick hand, and you'll get some valuble excercising onf the frest hand fingers too. Here's a trick Rusty Cooley (and now Troy Stetina, Mark Tremonti, and MAB himself) uses: Line up your first and second fingers on the first and second frets of the first string. Hit the first fret note, then hammer-on to the second fret note, and move that up a strong untill you reach the first string, in which case, you pull off back to the first fret and reverse the exercise (with pulloffs) back down to the 6th string. Then, move it up one fret at a time(2nd, 3rd, 4th..) untill you reach the 12th fret. Then repeat the exercise with finger sets 2-3, and 3-4.

Now, use your first and third fingers on the first and third frets up the strings. Same exercise, just one finger and fret apart, once again, all the way up to the 12th fret, then repeat with fingers 2-4 (you may wanna continue this one with fingers 1-4, for the sake of it). Now, repeat that exercise AGAIN, but this time, use fingers 1-2, on frets 1-3 to stretch them (I highly reccomend stretching your fingers before attempting this warmup, to make everything easier). Now, repeaat that with fingers 2-3, stretched between frets 1-3. I like to move up to the third fret for this exercise, because theyre slightly closer together. And yup, you guessed it, do it again with fingers 3-4, only start on at least the 5th fret this time. Then move up to 3-finger exercises. Fingers 1,2,4 on their respective frets, same for 1,3,4, and then do some stretching with 1, 2 and 4 across frets 1, 3 and 5. Continue in this manner untill eventually you get to 4 finger exercises and place a fret between each finger. USe a metronome (clicking in 16ths for the 2 and 4 finger exercises, in triplets/sextuplets for the two 3 finger ones). Start at around... 60-70bpm, only move up the speed when you can play these cleanly without screwing up. Oh, and I forgot to mention, use alternate picking to move across the strings! I've only gotten up to the first four-finger exercise, so I'm not that great yet, and I work at around 85bpm, but try to get as fast and clean as you can. A good picking exercise involves alternatley picking each note, but use legato moves at first, to build up finger strength. ( which is what this exercise is all about).
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#5
This workout requires alot of discipline to do, but it will strengthen your fingers and prepare them for shredding. Joe Satriani uses a similar routine, but he uses trills around the first fret, moving all the way up to sixth with him pinky finger in various finger-fret combos. Then he does that third 3-finger exercise I showed you, but instead of pulling-off, he just moves up a fret at the first string and does hammerons on the way down. There are a few jazz things he does as well, adn one I like to do combines the two finger exercises I showed you with "spider riffing", a technique used by Dave Mustaine of Megadeth (he's no shredder, but he;s a good guitarist nonetheless. Basically, you fret a power chord with fingers 1-3, then you fret an adjascent PC one fret up with fingers 2-4. Then move fingers 1-3 up to the next string set. This helps with finger independance and coordination, and is pretty tough in itself! Basically, spider riffing was created to help eleminate un-neccesary fret hand movement to save energy and to avoid string noise when moving laterally, but you can aply it to workouts just as easily. I hope my practice routine helps you Also, learn scales, nameley the Harmonic Minor scale, and research modes (check out the work of Joe Satriani and Randy Rhoads to hear what I'm talking about). Guitar World released a sorta instructional thing with Andy Aledort teaching it on metal guitar playing. Basically it's a bunch of riffs in the styles of some cool guitarists, but it will give you some info on modes and moving laterally across the neck. Nicolo Paganini's 25 caprices are pretty cool, too(classical violin, but you can find them arranged for guitar, I'm sure, GW published Yngwie Malmstein's transcription of the 5th caprice last year).
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#6
Would it be helpful if I went through the first pattern of a scale like e major and kept increasing the tempo on a metronome?
#7
Yes. Run throught he whole scale, too, and run it across the neck. The more scales the know, the more you'll be able to do later on. Also, Check out the lessons on this site by Kristofer Dahl. They will really help you, even if it's a little advanced for you. Work on scales all over the neck, and learn thier notes laterally across the neck so you can transpose better and stuff. The more you know, the better you'll get.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#8
Steve Vai's 10 hour workout is pretty nice for finger strength/stretching/dexterity/speed, also John Petrucci's Rock Discipline is great. First is just a text, the latter is a video dvd/pdf.
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

Boss Compressor & Chorus, Dunlop Crybaby, Behringer Delay, ISP Decimator, Ibanez Tubescreamer

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#9
Heh, yeah. In an interview with Matt Heafy of Trivium, he was asked what it takes to become a good guitarist, and he said "you have to own at least one John Petrucci instruction manual" xD I still need to get it, though... Along with Troy Stetina's lead guitar series, namley the Speed Mechanics For Lead Guitar book. I've tried his rythym method, and if the lead method is anything like it, then you will be shredding in no time Well, it will take a few months, but you'll be shredding. It's all about finding the right practice routine and sticking to it.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#10
Don't confuse Stetina's "Lead Guitar" and "Speed Mechanics" books, they're different things :p
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

Boss Compressor & Chorus, Dunlop Crybaby, Behringer Delay, ISP Decimator, Ibanez Tubescreamer

Laney TT50H, Marshall 1960A, Roland Cube 15

Looking to jam in Belfast, PM me!
#11
Quote by Shinozoku
Heh, yeah. In an interview with Matt Heafy of Trivium, he was asked what it takes to become a good guitarist, and he said "you have to own at least one John Petrucci instruction manual" xD I still need to get it, though... Along with Troy Stetina's lead guitar series, namley the Speed Mechanics For Lead Guitar book. I've tried his rythym method, and if the lead method is anything like it, then you will be shredding in no time Well, it will take a few months, but you'll be shredding. It's all about finding the right practice routine and sticking to it.



huhhhmmm....Matt Heafy is not a good guitarist.....huhhhmmmm....now he's a lot better than me, but what the heck was with that Guitarmageddon issue on total guitar? Not one of them was a "guitar god" and certainly none of them from Trivium...what about real guitarists like Joe Satch and Slash

Wooow, sorry, I went on a rant, but anyway

I found that after playing for a while you just get to a point where you can play fast, and to me that is different from shredding, but its actually more valuble than just being able to play drills at 100000000000 BPM...just my opinion
Gear:

Crafter FX550 EQL
Ibanez SA260FML

THD Univalve
Framus FR-212 Cab (Celestion Vintage 30's)

Dunlop Crybaby

Started playing May 28th 2005
#12
What really helped me is playing with a metronome and with really low gain. Hi gain covers up a lot of mistakes. I normally pick a lick that I really like and start it slow and increase the speed as my muscle memory gets it.
Don't follow the trends. Do what feels right.
#13
study theory - practice technique - practice correctly
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#14
I read recently about a 21 day method, practicing scales slowly for 21 days, at a constant speed.
I've decided to try this but playing a scale up and down for an hour is not that interesting. Would there be any disadvantage to learning by say watching TV or some other visual activity while practicing the scale? I'm really keen to try the method, but don't want to do things that will inhibit my improvment.
Is it also ok just to play the same scale up and down for an hour? Or will this technique build up speed in general, and not just for the one scale (in this case, minor pentatonic).

Thanks
#15
Don't just play the scale over and over. Play it in 3rd 4th 5th 6th and 7ths so your fingers learn to move around the fretboard not just up and down a particular scale.
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